Author Topic: Favourite Decorative Knot or braid.  (Read 13868 times)

drjbrennan

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Favourite Decorative Knot or braid.
« on: November 21, 2007, 09:25:12 PM »
What's your favourite?

I am in love with the Turkshead at the moment, and have a thing for the 'Snake knot sennit'. It's so satisfying to do!
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Frayed Knot Arts

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Re: Favourite Decorative Knot or braid.
« Reply #1 on: November 22, 2007, 03:24:24 AM »
17 strand "French Braid" sennit.  http://www.frayedknotarts.com/tutorials/french.html

Makes wonderful lanyards in small line and a great looking lady's belt or strap in larger.

KnotMe

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Re: Favourite Decorative Knot or braid.
« Reply #2 on: November 22, 2007, 05:47:39 AM »
my favourite has to be the Chinese button knot (decorative and functional!  http://www.chineseknotting.org/button/) which if you do one after the other makes a decent braid until someone pulls on it.  80 8) 8)
although my obsession of the moment has to be the stellar knot (http://www.chineseknotting.org/stellar/)

turks head 54

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Re: Favourite Decorative Knot or braid.
« Reply #3 on: November 22, 2007, 07:48:20 AM »
My favorite has to be the 5 lead 4 Bight Turks head(hence my Id Turks Head 54) ;D

TH54

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Re: Favourite Decorative Knot or braid.
« Reply #4 on: November 22, 2007, 04:39:18 PM »
Turks head... Because its universal and is a core knot for many other nice knots

Mrs Glenys Chew

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Re: Favourite Decorative Knot or braid.
« Reply #5 on: November 23, 2007, 11:09:31 PM »
Hi all,

I'm currently experimenting with the Viking Fingerweaving I learnt this summer at Yorvik.  If it has a better name than that, I'd be grateful for being told it.  It's a two-strand slipknot braid, and is nice and chunky.  I'm making wrist-loops and lanyards with it (all thanks to Willeke for the safe-breaking-point for lanyards) in 2mm cord, and much heavier-weight versions of the same in 5mm cord, of which the wrist-loops make good keyfobs as well, either short lengths, or enough to go round the wrist.  They're secured at each separate end with an overhand knot, just to ensure they don't unravel.

Then, if I've remembered to finish them off with enough lead, I put a diamond knot at the bottom to join both ends..  I've just mastered single diamonds, (thanks again to Bill Holt and Willeke, at the 1/2 yearly) although I seem to have some problem on doubling the diamond.  I think I must run inside instead of outside, or viceversa, or something.  I shall have to take time out to jot down exactly what I'm doing with them, and then go through the various combinations to find out where I'm going wrong.

Another combination I like is Granny Solomon Bars, topped and bottomed with a diamond, for a very chunky zip pull.  Topping and bottoming them like that means they don't slide about and distort as much, which is what happens when I don't do it, or also happens to the Reef Solomons.

I've tried a simple Turk's Head, but I don't get enough time to put one together, often enough to get fast enough to be able to do it when I don't have enough time - if that makes sense  ::)
Mrs Glenys Chew
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PatDucey

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Re: Favourite Decorative Knot or braid.
« Reply #6 on: November 26, 2007, 09:09:06 PM »
The Turks Head Cross.  Check out the tutorial at: http://www.khww.net/readarticle.php?article_id=49

Pat

drjbrennan

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Re: Favourite Decorative Knot or braid.
« Reply #7 on: November 27, 2007, 08:35:50 PM »
Hi all,

I'm currently experimenting with the Viking Fingerweaving I learnt this summer at Yorvik.  If it has a better name than that, I'd be grateful for being told it.  It's a two-strand slipknot braid, and is nice and chunky.  I'm making wrist-loops and lanyards with it (all thanks to Willeke for the safe-breaking-point for lanyards) in 2mm cord, and much heavier-weight versions of the same in 5mm cord, of which the wrist-loops make good keyfobs as well, either short lengths, or enough to go round the wrist.  They're secured at each separate end with an overhand knot, just to ensure they don't unravel.


I am a fan of all things Viking (as in my Avatar Knot) and I would love a link or some photos to try out your Fingerweaving!
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Mrs Glenys Chew

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Re: Favourite Decorative Knot or braid.
« Reply #8 on: November 30, 2007, 02:05:40 AM »
Hi there John!

I will try and get some photos organised some time (I'm guessing from Phil's videos that he has a camera mounted on a high tripod looking over his shoulder, maybe I could use that technique and the timer button).  In the meantime, I'll follow Willeke's example ( http://igkt.net/sm/index.php?topic=323.0 - as quoted in her post on the Diamond Knot) and tell you what I do.

(Ahem, knuckles flexed and at the ready?)

Taking a full both-arms stretched of cord (that's five feet on me) I decide what I'm going to make and put the appropriate split ring, clasp or whatever in the centre, dropping equal cord on each side.  Then I choose a location for an overhand knot - close to the split ring, or further away, between 6-8 inches if I'm going to finish with a diamond knot.

Grip the split ring and overhand knot comfortably with the lower fingers of the hand you work with, and use the other hand to control your two working ends.  Tension these one over your thumb and the other over the index finger, secured with the lower fingers and spread apart to form a V running (in my righthanded case) from the point on the right hand (held in the lower fingers - at this stage keep your thumb and index held up out of the way, so your hand is (to quote Willeke) in the classic child's gunslinger position) to the spread on the left hand.

The following movements mimic the action of a sewing machine, if that helps, and are all performed by the right hand, except for the initial loop over the index finger and the tensioning that's needed:

Loop one cord (I invariably do the left index finger first) over both thumb and indexfinger of the right hand, working from the outside of one digit to the outside of the other (no cord should drop between the thumb and forefinger).

You now have a cord running from the lower fingers, up the inside of the hand between the middle and index fingers, across the back of the index and thumb, and back down over the thumb, to cross over the standing cord (looks a bit like a bow tie or infinity symbol).

Close your right thumb and index finger around the standing cord (left thumb - or the one that is underneath on the crossing point) above (furthest past) the crossover point.  Bring the fingers back through the loop to relax the hand, but don't let go just yet!

TRICKY BIT: You have to turn the cord as it slides into form as the new loop.  Whichever left finger it came from, that is the side that has to be dominant, so that the cord running back to the standing side always lays on the outside.  So, if you have followed my lead, as the new loop emerges from the first loop, your right thumb will rise up to take the strain, and your right index finger will move position to slide up the thumb, and into the underneath of the loop, and spread apart to widen it enough to work with in the next movement.

If you are working the other way round, and have taken the cord from the left index instead of the left thumb, then it is your right index finger that takes the strain, and the thumb will shift position to enlarge the loop.

Why? 
It took me 20metres of raffia-style washing line, in the dark, coming home from Blackpool to figure it out: Turning the cord so that the line lays to the outside gives a smoother, more precise chain, which is visually much more pleasing.  Keeping it to the inside just somehow looked tatty, and seemed to use up much more cord.  Why this should be, I don't know.  Perhaps I was just doing it wrong.  I've done it in daylight plenty of times since, and although there is a place for the inside line, I just feel that the outside looks more presentable.

Once you have your new loop, use your left hand to take up the slack from the previous slipknot, drawing it down firmly and snugly to the base of the rope that is forming.  The snugger the better for the first loop.  You will find it necessary, every once in a while, to shift the position of the hand on the left, as it has a tendency to creep down the rope as you take up the slack.

Now reach the right thumb and index finger through their loop, and pickup and pull through the standing cord from the other left finger (in this example, that should now be the left index finger).  You will find it easy to keep track of whether you are left or right, with two observations:
   1 - You can't pick up the cord you just worked with, because it will jam - the retiring loop won't slide down to close, and
   2 - The cord you have just worked with lays on the same side as the finger you just took it from.  So you want the other side/other finger.

As you create each new loop on the right, manipulate the growing rope/cable down to be held safely by the lower right fingers.  I find that the best formed cable/rope in this method is made by working horizontally (that is, keeping as much of the formed rope as possible in line with the standing and working cords.  I notice that when I let the formed cable drop, say below 45 degrees, I get a kink, which is usually one of the loops pulling snug too much, even though I think I used the same tension on it.

Like any chain braid, even tension and pulling down snug are the keys to a smooth product.  I would say that snug is definitely the right word - tight would spoil the tension.  However, it probably depends on the cord you're using.

And I always find I have more left on one side than on the other.  I haven't figured that out yet.

I suggest learning it on a large cord (5mm or so - one reason why I like Wilkinson's ?1.50 for 30m washing lines so much), before trying smaller cord.

I've been working on some lanyards for teacher friends with playground duties - they need something to put their whistles on  ;)  - I find that 20 feet in 5mm comes down to a nice chunky lanyard, dropping about 9 inches from the base of the neck (I haven't got one in front of me to measure - I'll put measurements on my to-do list; and rewriting my very elderly and long-untouched website a bit further down on the to-do list).  I'm doing some more in 2mm cord, which are probably more suitable.

When I have finished my chain, I pass the last standing cord through the last loop and pull it right through, so I have two loose ends again, and then finish with another overhand knot for security.  If I'm making it into a diamond knot to finish, I omit the last overhand knot, and undo the first to give me a bit extra length.  It doesn't work brilliantly, though, because then I get too much left over on the loop coming out of the diamond.  More thinking needed there.  I'm also experimenting with different ways of knotting onto a split ring, without putting it on at the beginning.  The various stopper knots look interesting, and even the perfection loop (although it looks a bit bulky in double cord).  I shall carry on ....  tomorrow ... er, I mean, today....

Good night  - oh, I have looked up fingerweaving on the net several times, but I've not come across this method illustrated, yet.  All the stuff I've found related to tablet weaving, or much more complex methods.  NativeTech http://www.nativetech.org/finger/beltinstr.html  looks more like a simple version of true weaving, and http://www.ehow.com/how_2075048_finger-weave.html sounds more like what I know as French knitting (4 pins banged into a cotton reel, and a crochet hook to form the loops).  If this is of any interest to anyone, I did come up with a link for chainmail weaving: http://www.beadingtimes.com/project0306.htm  -  I'll let the interested take it up from there.

Willeke told me that these sorts of braids were the forerunners of elastic bands.  I haven't tried that yet, but I well believe it.

Regards
Glenys

Mrs Glenys Chew
1 Corinthians 15:10

Tom

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Re: Favourite Decorative Knot or braid.
« Reply #9 on: December 03, 2007, 07:13:47 PM »
Might we take a moment to celebrate the simple beauty of the Reef Knot?
x

DerekSmith

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Re: Favourite Decorative Knot or braid.
« Reply #10 on: December 03, 2007, 09:01:45 PM »
Might we take a moment to celebrate the simple beauty of the Reef Knot?
x

Tom,

The 'x' is a giveaway that you must be sitting on your morphine pump, but I have to agree that there is beauty in the line, form and functionality of our simplest knots, both at rest and at work.

Still, to those who proudly wear the anorak, there is a pleasure to the feel and promise of a simple piece of Fillis Garden Twine - the humblest of hairy string with an aroma redolent of warm summer days in the garden, virgin yet to takes its first knot.

So here is a glass to the beauty of our 'simple' knots.

Derek

Mrs Glenys Chew

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Re: Favourite Decorative Knot or braid.
« Reply #11 on: December 04, 2007, 12:25:03 AM »
Hi Tom,

Like you said in your post on the Diamond, it's great to see how one knot can be transformed into another.  Salutes are deserved not only by the Reef, but also by the Half-Hitch family, with all the numerous grandchildren and great-grandchildren there  :)

Regards
Glenys
Mrs Glenys Chew
1 Corinthians 15:10

Tom

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Re: Favourite Decorative Knot or braid.
« Reply #12 on: December 06, 2007, 02:08:06 PM »
Salutes - and fond embraces - to the whole Hitchin' lot of them, Mrs Chew! Even the simplest of whippings brings me such delight (but let's not take that out if its knotting context, eh?)
And, Derek, I know exactly what you mean about the string: Oh, the possibilities! But why stop there? The single point, before it is reeled out into a second dimension, might be occasion for another toast (or two)! And is Dunny work a promotion from 'Tea Boy', or are you being punished?

DerekSmith

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Re: Favourite Decorative Knot or braid.
« Reply #13 on: December 06, 2007, 06:37:19 PM »
Hi Tom,

Your 'point' is well made.  By itself in one dimension, a singularity, release it to dance in three dimensions and with a history and a future and you have  -- 42, Life the Universe and Everything --

"The Moving Finger writes; and, having writ,
Moves on: nor all your Piety nor Wit
Shall lure it back to cancel half a Line,
Nor all your Tears wash out a Word of it"

   -- Omar Khayyam

Dunny Man?  Well, my day job official title is 'The Tea Boy' (AKA the MD), but while I was in the garden a few days ago clearing up the doggy doos, I realised that I spend a lot of my life clearing up the sh1t behind everyone -- customers, family, friends, dogs, the horse etc. etc. -- so what prouder appellation could I give myself.

But enough of me.  Had any thoughts what your tag line might be?  How about  -- 'The Running Man - Oy vey'

Keep your powder dry.

Derek
« Last Edit: December 06, 2007, 06:52:53 PM by DerekSmith »