Author Topic: An Adaptation To The Prusik Loop  (Read 282 times)

TX Tool Crib

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An Adaptation To The Prusik Loop
« on: September 09, 2021, 09:22:28 AM »
Hello everyone,

  About 30 years ago, I was having trouble with a Taut Line Hitch holding well. I began to play around, and having known the Prussik, I made an adaptation to this knot to be used as an adjustable fixed loop knot, or a linear grip knot, whichever you prefer. I have included a link to my YouTube video that details how this knot is formed. I was encouraged to join IGKT to investigate whether this is a new knot, or one that has been previously discovered that I happened across. I look forward to hearing your input.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_5fNZ_NYm9Q&list=PL1Oah52FqxCeGmGwngnrGbUYDMq-_bjLd&index=13
« Last Edit: September 09, 2021, 09:23:30 AM by TX Tool Crib »

roo

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Re: An Adaptation To The Prusik Loop
« Reply #1 on: September 10, 2021, 03:09:26 AM »
Hello everyone,

  About 30 years ago, I was having trouble with a Taut Line Hitch holding well. I began to play around, and having known the Prussik, I made an adaptation to this knot to be used as an adjustable fixed loop knot, or a linear grip knot, whichever you prefer. I have included a link to my YouTube video that details how this knot is formed. I was encouraged to join IGKT to investigate whether this is a new knot, or one that has been previously discovered that I happened across. I look forward to hearing your input.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_5fNZ_NYm9Q&list=PL1Oah52FqxCeGmGwngnrGbUYDMq-_bjLd&index=13

Even for use on slippery line, the amount of coils and rope used is going to pose a barrier for adoption.  Typically, adjustable loops are more economical in rope consumption.  For an example, the HFP Slippery 8 Loop tends to perform quite well in slick line, including monofilament:

https://notableknotindex.webs.com/slippery8.html
« Last Edit: September 10, 2021, 03:12:12 AM by roo »
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Dan_Lehman

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Re: An Adaptation To The Prusik Loop
« Reply #2 on: September 10, 2021, 05:18:03 PM »
For an example, the HFP Slippery 8 Loop tends to perform quite well in slick line, including monofilament:
https://notableknotindex.webs.com/slippery8.html
... in which there's the statement
"This knot depends on having the end of the rope "turn the corner" for its security, "
to which I'll remark that, if the tail runs through the same path
but in the opposite direction, that is what I name "the Quick 8"
and will hold, in some materials.  I had it tested in 12-strand
Dyneema (w/some dark blue coating) but with the tail further tucked
back down between the eye legs --though it didn't seem to
stress this tucked part much!?

--dl*
====
« Last Edit: September 11, 2021, 06:21:36 PM by Dan_Lehman »

agent_smith

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Re: An Adaptation To The Prusik Loop
« Reply #3 on: September 12, 2021, 02:13:09 AM »
Hello 'TX Tool Crib' (nice name),

Thanks for your post and video presentation.
Your variation of the Prusik noose hitch does improve grip on the SPart (standing part).

EDIT NOTE:
Your presentation is a claim of originally.
The Prusik noose hitch is derived from #1763 - and isn't new.
Your presentation is simply a variation of the #1763 derived Prusik noose hitch.
As with all claims of originality, only in the fullness of time will you be able to determine if your claim is valid.
Many claims actually turn out to be re-discoveries (eg the Butterfly, the Riggers bend, etc).
You'll just need to be patient - and I'm sure that some readers will be checking and thinking whether your claim is original.

By the way - it is best described as an adjustable noose.
All of these types of noose hitches have an adjustable eye - and load is split 50/50 across both legs of the eye.
This means that only 50% of the load is available to perform useful 'work' within the core of the hitch structure.

Refer to my attached image of the #1763 derived Prusik noose hitch.
Its shown loosely tied for clarity.
In any load tests of your presentation, this base structure would serve as a 'control' to compare against.

Your variation clamps the 'bridge' of the Prusik and adds some more friction with the final hitch around the SPart.
In the regular Prusik noose hitch , the bridge and 'S' turns are non-active.
NOTE: My photo image show Z/S geometry where the functional part of the hitch is the 'Z' turns... also valid in reverse S/Z geometry.
Essentially, your presentation enhances compression around the SPart because the bridge is 'seized'.

...

It might be worthwhile to also look at roo's 'Gnat hitch'.
Link: https://notableknotindex.webs.com/gnathitch.html
This is also an adjustable noose hitch.
In my opinion, it is very efficient because it uses less cord, has a smaller footprint and grips remarkably well.
« Last Edit: September 12, 2021, 03:59:48 AM by agent_smith »

KC

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Re: An Adaptation To The Prusik Loop
« Reply #4 on: September 14, 2021, 09:07:16 AM »
Another ABoK 'open'/1 leg of pull Prusik reference is Lesson#481 in the Tree Surgeon section of ABoK, more 2/2 style tho.
.
The "HFP Slippery8 Loop" is more functionally a Bent8 Loop in actual practice to me.
>>but very good utility grade adjustable eye in any case.
>>Bitter End left unloaded.
.
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