Author Topic: Displacements of Rope Rigidity  (Read 213 times)

KC

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Displacements of Rope Rigidity
« on: July 20, 2020, 11:17:36 AM »
Bends and Hitches take a focused linear force input thru SPart;
And de-focus/disperse it radially around arcs to reduce tensions to the further ropeParts.
>>This also makes these further/later ropeParts less rigid
>>because same container size(rope) is now less full of tensions.
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So that in crossings of WE(Working End) of lesser tensions,
>>can cross under existing, more rigid ropeParts to pinch/nip lesser under greater OR
>>WE can cross over and 'paste' the greater rigidity to firmer frictions against host
The intensity, of how the present tensions (that cause rigidity) are used to pinch/paste
>>is at most premium of each arcApex whom's axis lies in same direction as input force axis
(not necessarily same axis, but same axises directions)
180 arc ends also feed into same directional axis, as input, but not necessarily same axis/just directions
>>while nonArcs, who's ends pull in opposing directions give the least crossing forces (pinch or paste).
For the arcs can use both sine and cosine for friction force of control;
>>BUT nonArcs use cosine for the load and sine for frictions
>>BUT in arcs the cosine is the greater determinant force, that nonArcs don't use for frictions...
(so nonArcs not only forsake 1 of the 2 forces(cosine)as friction usage, to only keep lesser sine for crossings)
This is what makes common HH worst Nip position, is load side under nonArc.
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Top side/opposite side of host than load pull line is Natural gravity line; shows the effect most intensely.
>>Lesser pressure crossing just firms/increases frictions for greater tension reduction.
While greater pressure crossing can totally 'squash' tensions, to not pass further/ 'nip forces in bud'

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Scheduling other ropeParts at crossings instead of hand can give same effects of 'Paste or Pinch'
As the greater tensioned ropePart is more rigidly force dense is crossed over by WE
>>the lesser firms, but cant displace firmer rigidities so can allow greater to tunnel under/thru the lesser.
Where as if WE(lesser than the previous tensioned rigidities that are closer to source/input)
>>the greater tensioned rigidity can stomp/squash closed the passage of tensioned force
>>fully nipping to secure if no force makes it thru the crossing.
Pasting firms frictions for some force displacements/reductions, slowing down force travel intensity thru rope
>>while full nipping of greater rigidity sandwiching lesser to host fully displacing tension forces
To stop force flow, the sandwiched rope part MUST be equal to or lesser RIGIDITY than crossing part.

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Note how, the 'rope circuit' is the same exact pattern in above pic
>>only the tension force is  (as if electric force thru same circuit) is ported backwards thru the 'rope circuit' for different effects.
>>just as routing electric force backwards thru same circuit of transformers, diodes, transistors etc. would give different effect
(or even sometimes, just reversing polarity to same electric circuit)
« Last Edit: July 20, 2020, 11:24:29 AM by KC »
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KC

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Re: Displacements of Rope Rigidity
« Reply #1 on: August 02, 2020, 11:27:55 AM »
Looking at a Clove as opposing HHs has helped guide many to forming the Clove properly.
BUT, in force trace of utility of functions,
>>watching if the lesser/softer WE serves over or under the greater/more rigid ropeParts
We can diagnose 1 paste, and even (pressure wise) 1 pinch/nip/hitch
>>but the pinch/nip/hitch is softened a bit towards the paste side
>>as is NOT sandwiching the WE against the host with full force
The radial position does give the 2nd crossing pinch close to full sine of arc + some cosine

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The only way to get a top Nip from the Clove formation is to ballast the other leg
>>else the crossing rotates from top to the side of the imposed pull.
In this position, neither crossing gives nip/pinch/hitch type function
>>SParts (linear input)as the most tensioned/rigid parts, can't be pinched/nip to HH fn(computerese for function)
>>for it can only be crossed by lesser, later rope tensions to 'paste' SParts firmer to host NOT pinch as to nip/hitch
Even tho is at greatest radial position to exert the ropeTensions to 'express' those forces
>>onto the leads from SParts.
(Nip not really needed, as each 'Bitter End' is but an EXTERNALLY ballast to secure,
>>NOT dependent on internal knot structure to give Nip as securing ballast against input force imposed.

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Making a Clove on load side (or rotating normal Clove to this position)
>>places the crossings off of the host, giving greatest deformity to SPart as Cow, Muenter, Prussik etc. do
>>also gives least nipping, in fact can use on carabiner(sometimes 2 carabiners w/opposing gates for softer rope arc/bend)
to lower a light load.

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Rope-n-Saw Life
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KC

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Re: Displacements of Rope Rigidity
« Reply #2 on: August 06, 2020, 12:08:28 PM »
In the geometries of space taken or force invoked, it is about DISPLACEMENT.
To control, with force, takes displacing into that space, with enough force to match or beat the existing force
>>for positively commanding displacement to rule/Nip situation ('in the bud')
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The ruling rigidity is gained by matching linked target forces or being greater/not lesser.
>>The base/unloaded rigidity of the materials matters for this advantage
>>The amount of tension force
>>and how densely that force is packed into each part as yet another rigidity adjustment
Different force loads in diameters for the crossing over to be great enough to Nip the sandwiched ropePart

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Sometimes see questioned if Square Knot should be still taught
>>i always think YES, for is a minimal structure study, with fewest parts
>>on edge of make or break(fail) and things that change that
(errant bend usage, unequal diameters, formations or disturbances that 'pull out of square' form etc.)

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i first note many things in the minimalist study of Square family(Square/Thief/Granny/Grief)
>>and would usually forsake American upbringing and call as original name Reef in respects to how many knots born at sea
BUT, the name Square is so excellent to force chase, and constant reminder that all rope mechnix best if 'square' to purpose
>>the minimalist Square Knot, just more sensitive to that, as Thief/Granny/Grief fail by pulling out of square, as does tugging end.
The SheetBend invokes a locking hitch that can free stand off of host mount (unlike Square that is dependent on host to nip against)
>>so has another layer of simplest/base lessons, and how a more rigid locks on softer rigidity etc.

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Friction Hitches show the matching or greater principle too
>>advise a single leg of pull (A) can match rigidity to single line and control (Taut-Line, ProLaska/Blake's etc.)
But dividing load to 2 legs pull on host /receiver and are trying to grab greater rigidity with lesser(B) can fail
>>using a smaller cord to pack lesser divided force into a denser/more rigid container can resolve(C)

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The smaller 'cord' can also be a more rigid /unyielding braid, too stiff to seat properly like this on own diameter
>>but flexible enough to seat well on larger diameter host
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i think the term (Friction) Hitch is accurate, as the function is to slide the hitch up/down to repeatedly grip
passive 'rail' whether rope or not , the rigidity examination tho is for rope on rope
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Friction hitch grabs on smooth pole can slip some as rope can't 'dent' impose into the host

Rope-n-Saw Life
"Nature, to be commanded, must be obeyed" -Sir Francis Bacon
We now return you to the safety of normal thinking peoples.
~ Please excuse the interruption; thanx -the mgmt.~