Author Topic: Hello, this is my first post  (Read 1195 times)

DDK

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Re: Hello, this is my first post
« Reply #15 on: November 16, 2020, 10:22:49 PM »
I do have the impression, quite possibly mistaken, that the OP is talking primarily about a midline loop.

In the video at 1:06, if I heard them correctly, "Its just a bight, putting a bight in a line", see attached freeze frame at 1:09.  In the OP, "It's a simple knot, just a knot that puts a loop in a line.".  I also associate midline loops more with lashing down loose gear than I do termination loops.





tsik_lestat

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Re: Hello, this is my first post
« Reply #16 on: November 17, 2020, 12:30:57 AM »
Thanks for the clarifications,

I have  no objection with the midline characterization, i am just wondering if OP's real purpose was to present just a bowline tied in the middle of the line (the eye legs are crossed in both depictions ,video and images hence it smells bowline to me. If parallel then 1050).

As a matter of fact, these tugboat style knots, are midline geometrical representations of the TIB 1010, regardless of the fact that we leave a short tail end and load them as end of line eyeknots.

« Last Edit: November 17, 2020, 05:23:33 PM by tsik_lestat »
Going knots

DDK

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Re: Hello, this is my first post
« Reply #17 on: November 17, 2020, 04:13:51 AM »
Regarding the crossing of the midline loop legs,

The crossing of midline loop legs is not unlike the crossing of the two working ends in the final tuck of a bend.  Cutting the fixed loop produces a bend while fusing the working ends of a bend produces the fixed loop.  One archetype for the different tucks of the working ends in a bend is the "Whatnot" (ABoK 1406/1407).  The two types of working end crossing produced, left-twist and right-twist, behave quite differently but are both known as "Whatnot" bends (or possibly, "Whatnot" loop knots after fusing).  ABoK 1408/1409 is an example of another bend with two types of crossing as is the Ashley Bend, ABoK 1452/?.  The Ashley Bend tucked akin to ABoK 1406 and 1408 appears to be more jam-proof than the the one tucked akin to ABoK 1407 and 1409.

The Harness Loop has three variations for the tucking of the loop legs: left-twist, right-twist and side-by-side.  The ABoK figure of 1050 that I attached earlier is suggestive of two of those variations.  The loop knot in question corresponds to the third variation.  It would stand to reason that they would all be called Harness Loops (or possibly, Harness bends after cutting). 

Also of interest, it is easy to imagine that a heavy loading of the Harness Loop could untwist the tuck in the loop legs resulting in the side-by-side tucked configuration of the Harness Loop.

tsik_lestat

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Re: Hello, this is my first post
« Reply #18 on: November 17, 2020, 11:34:17 AM »
Well spotted the correlation between asymmetrical bends and their corresponding fusioned inline fixed TIB profiles (see butterfly too).

With respect to the harness and its legs crossing, i am really having no trouble with the moniker used, all i care is about its very function, while if i was to use it inevitably, i'd certainly choose the " crossing legs variation", in particular the one associated with the bowline, as the crossing area multiplies the friction, providing an improvement to the overall stability and security of the knot.

Afterall, there are many cases we have seen that a twisted bight tucked "somewhere," (as in the OP) might produce  different and more stable results, than a non-twisted bight.

One other example, is the girth hitch and its crossed legs variation, the more stable pretzel mat! :o
« Last Edit: November 17, 2020, 05:28:08 PM by tsik_lestat »
Going knots