Author Topic: two tight TIB hitches  (Read 286 times)

Andreas

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two tight TIB hitches
« on: September 07, 2019, 01:32:03 PM »
Please have a look here..

Andreas

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Re: two tight TIB hitches
« Reply #1 on: September 10, 2019, 09:22:41 PM »
... and their sister

Dan_Lehman

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Re: two tight TIB hitches
« Reply #2 on: September 11, 2019, 08:28:55 PM »
But I believe that one does better in making
the rope bind rope, devoid of any dependence
upon the hitched object.  (So, I've fiddled with
overhand structures in the tail around the
crossing parts of the clove/cow.)


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agent_smith

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Re: two tight TIB hitches
« Reply #3 on: September 12, 2019, 01:23:09 AM »
Since this was posted under 'New knot investigations' - I assume that Andreas is claiming this as an original creation by him?
Otherwise, it would have been posted elsewhere?
There are no accompanying words - and so no insight is tendered from the creator.
Since it is not clear who the originator / creator is, it could have been developed by a third party and then posted here to solicit discussion on the creators behalf? It isn't clear...

The first (top) photo does not make it clear as to which is the SPart and which is the tail...one could guess... and presumably the intent of the photo is to leave it open to interpretation?
If the purpose was to remove the choice of which is the intended SPart - I assume the tail would have been clearly indicated.
I ask this because it is possible to experiment and choose the rope segment existing from the bottom of the photo as being the SPart - which would make use of a 'capstan effect'.
Whereas choosing the the rope segment exiting from the top of the photo would employ an entirely different mechanism.

Does the creator intend this hitch to be used only on timber host material with a round profile?
Or can the host material be in the form of a square profile?
What is the intended practical application? Camping outdoors, yachting, ?
Is the hitch intended as a binder - to progressively cinch and crush the host with increasing force?
Or is the hitch intended to grip the host - so it can be hoisted or moved?
Is the hitch intended to be releasable (easily untied) after application of load?

Andreas

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Re: two tight TIB hitches
« Reply #4 on: September 12, 2019, 06:42:56 PM »
thanks for feedback.

after reading agent smith feedback, I believe i got the wrong category, this is not to claim anything.
I believe those are original knots, so I thought it would be nice to present and maybe discuss them in this context.

I post them to make them available for the one interested. Discussing them is extra and will be more fruitful in a category less specialised. why not move this ?!


roo

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Re: two tight TIB hitches
« Reply #5 on: September 12, 2019, 09:07:26 PM »
It might be helpful to show the hitches loosened such that there is no ambiguity or showing sequential tying steps. 

Also, do the hitches have any particular application or special properties?
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Andreas

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Re: two tight TIB hitches
« Reply #6 on: September 16, 2019, 03:51:21 PM »
Re Roo,
all three hitches start like a clove hitch, crossing from right to left in this picture.

these Hitches are meant to grip the pole firmly and keep their tension. Maybe the ease of untieing will differ... after handstrong pull all three release easy but in distinctly different ways of pulling the tail.

Hitch 1 and hitch 2 are making use of the locking mechanism shown by Constant Xarax.. see pic
Hitch 1 stays more tight than hitch two, as the final tuck is helping the initial lock (as in the pic below) to function well. (in hitch 1, the final bight of the tail stays slack)
« Last Edit: September 19, 2019, 02:02:41 PM by Andreas »