Author Topic: Sheepshank alternative that remains tied while slack  (Read 5180 times)

KC

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Re: Sheepshank alternative that remains tied while slack
« Reply #15 on: July 03, 2021, 09:30:26 AM »
k, few days.
Have tried that Bowline-esque finish on ends too, just not what came to mind and this i did this previously and slid it in here.
Main topic when made was pointing out the 'flop' due to lack of stiffness allows lock of hitch to come out to 2 competing, barely misaligned crunchers, now with more force than at 90 degree angle and frictions, to even more so work it's way out.  This style ending pictured was to illustrate that fail..
« Last Edit: July 03, 2021, 09:34:46 AM by KC »
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fidian

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Re: Sheepshank alternative that remains tied while slack
« Reply #16 on: July 04, 2021, 06:30:29 AM »
I wish you'd turn those BWLs around to show
the front side of the knot --not the same ol' wrong/back side
which has plagued BWL images forEVER (about all Google
Images delivers, but for Mark's "Detail View" ones, thankfully).

I am new here and would love to understand more about the bowline showing the back. To me, the knot doesn't have a front nor a back. It is also without a top and a bottom. It's merely my perspective that gives the knot these attributes. The concept of a knot being backwards is novel and I could use some education on the history and reasoning behind this topic.

Thanks for any guidance that could be provided!

KC

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Re: Sheepshank alternative that remains tied while slack
« Reply #17 on: July 04, 2021, 09:42:37 AM »
    Reason for detail view is in thee PACI Bowline paper.
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By design, the Sheepshank does not keep a firm lock that is usually carefully placed/but then lost;
perhaps better in stiffer, more friction bearing ropes that can help mediate, but not completely overcome this fail;
as seems noted in history, during usages of such materials, as not an optimum /lacking.
.

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ABoK reflects on Sheepshank more ornamental than functional for the sailor
>> many have questioned it's continual including in collections
>> some have faulted BSA for teaching still as a hold out
Digging thru the way back machine tracked into lost Henry Bushby presentation for Mariner's Museum and his works quoting John Smith's of Jamestown book "A Sea Grammar" in 1627 then another author expounding on this "1644, Henry Manwayring published his Sea-Mans Dictionary, which provided more detailed descriptions of the knots first mentioned by Smith".  This page quotes that they depended on 3 knots at sea mostly: Sheepshank, Wall and Bowline.  But then in picturing 3 versions of Sheepshank 2 are locked against above fault:

Sheepshank dispenses/isolates more rope neatly than Alpine Butterfly (which is otherwise superior) and more trustworthy in the locked forms shown.
« Last Edit: July 11, 2021, 05:35:28 PM by KC »
"Nature, to be commanded, must be obeyed" -Sir Francis Bacon
We now return you to the safety of normal thinking peoples.
~ Please excuse the interruption; thanx -the mgmt.~