Author Topic: Splicing manual for logging  (Read 332 times)

tomh

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Splicing manual for logging
« on: January 11, 2019, 07:19:47 AM »
From the mighty forests of British Columbia, here's a splicing manual that's specific to the logging industry.

https://www.worksafebc.com/en/resources/health-safety/books-guides/a-manual-on-splicing?lang=en

And if you're interested in the cable yarding systems that the splicing manual refers to, here's the book on that:

https://www.worksafebc.com/en/resources/health-safety/books-guides/cable-yarding-systems-handbook?lang=en

Dan_Lehman

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Re: Splicing manual for logging
« Reply #1 on: January 12, 2019, 07:59:59 PM »
Interesting to see another case of parochial knots
naming :: the logging book calls the sheet bends
(sng./dbl) "cat's paw" (single/double) !?

I wonder how this misnomer got traction?  One might
think that the normally understood version of the
cat's paw --i.e., opposed lobes of a halved bight
turned in mirror rotation to each others, making
a multi-twisted, two-eyed structure-- was more like
what workers with wire rope actually used?!

I'm reminded that utility-pole support lines have
eyes that are distinct pieces from the galvanized
steel line, and are attached to that line --being
properly/specially sized-- simply by wrapping them
around it (the eye being of *open* wire halves that
fit perfectly around the guy-line wire); it surprises
me that this structure has such friction to hold,
but obviously it does.


Thanks,
--dl*
====

DerekSmith

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Re: Splicing manual for logging
« Reply #2 on: January 23, 2019, 02:03:27 PM »
Lovely reference Tom, thank you.

I wonder, could the pdf files be downloaded and saved into the IGKT archives?

Derek

tomh

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Re: Splicing manual for logging
« Reply #3 on: January 24, 2019, 09:37:10 PM »
...I'm reminded that utility-pole support lines have
eyes that are distinct pieces from the galvanized
steel line, and are attached to that line --being
properly/specially sized-- simply by wrapping them
around it (the eye being of *open* wire halves that
fit perfectly around the guy-line wire); it surprises
me that this structure has such friction to hold,
but obviously it does.

I had a chat about this with a lineman recently. The cable they use for guys is called "guy strand", and it is of 1x7 construction. The short bits used for making terminations are called "dead-ends" (in local parlance, at least), and as you said they are sized to fit just so and are preformed into a helix. The dead-ends have dabs of paint to indicated where the wrap needs to start in order to obtain the requisite length.

Curiously, the technicians with a touring show that came to my theatre a couple of weeks ago used the term "buck line" for what I call a "guy line". Hadn't heard that one before, but sure enough the local crew and I switched to using their term for the week. Vive le difference!

tomh

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Re: Splicing manual for logging
« Reply #4 on: January 29, 2019, 06:14:06 AM »
I wonder, could the pdf files be downloaded and saved into the IGKT archives?

It can be downloaded for personal use easily enough, but I don't see where it could be kept here... Does anyone know more?

In any case, I'll endeavour to find out if hard copies are still available from WorkSafeBC, so that at least the IGKT library could get one.