Author Topic: Slipping Bowline On A Bight  (Read 1713 times)

Matty

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Slipping Bowline On A Bight
« on: December 02, 2017, 08:04:39 AM »
On tying a Bowline On A Bight, I noticed that if the wrong bight is pulled through that a knot is created that resembles a Bowline On A Bight but which slips. It looks like it might be a useful knot in some settings. I am curious to know whether this is a documented knot and whether it has a name.

agent_smith

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Re: Slipping Bowline On A Bight
« Reply #1 on: December 02, 2017, 11:49:44 PM »
Quote
On tying a Bowline On A Bight, I noticed that if the wrong bight is pulled through that a knot is created that resembles a Bowline On A Bight but which slips.

Hi Matty, Thanks for posting your question.
I am trying to understand what you mean by "wrong bight is pulled".

In the #1080 Bowline-on-a-bight, there is only one (1) 'bight'. There aren't 2 'bights'.

Are you sure that your question pertains to #1080 and not some other Bowline?
Maybe you were referring to #1074 (Bowline with a bight) or #1079 (Sister loops) or #1083 (Double bowline on-the-bight)?

Although, if you look at #1081 and #1082, Ashley shows these alternative tying methods of arriving at #1080..and maybe you were referring to one of these alternative tying methods and pulled a different rope segment to arrive at what you are describing?

I also attached an image showing one of Xarax's explorations of 'transforming' #1080. So it could be some variation of this technique?
Clarification is required please :)
« Last Edit: December 02, 2017, 11:53:06 PM by agent_smith »

knotsaver

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Re: Slipping Bowline On A Bight
« Reply #2 on: December 03, 2017, 01:02:06 AM »
Quote
On tying a Bowline On A Bight, I noticed that if the wrong bight is pulled through that a knot is created that resembles a Bowline On A Bight but which slips.

Hi Matty, Thanks for posting your question.
I am trying to understand what you mean by "wrong bight is pulled".
...
Clarification is required please :)

Hello Mark (and welcome to Matty),
I think Matty is referring to a mis-tied BoaB, I mean, when the nipping loop "moves" (vanishes, reverses) from the ongoing eye leg to the returning eye leg  you obtain a noose/hitch (see ABoK #1082 diagram bottom-right (do not take into account the arrows)), in particular you have a Pile Hitch (ABoK #1815) made fast to its (double) Standing Part...it is something like ABoK #1863 with the double Standing Part taking the place of the ring...
I don't know if it has a name or if it is documented.
Ciao,
s.
« Last Edit: December 03, 2017, 01:29:28 AM by knotsaver »

Dan_Lehman

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Re: Slipping Bowline On A Bight
« Reply #3 on: December 04, 2017, 06:48:59 PM »
Quote
On tying a Bowline On A Bight, I noticed that if the wrong bight is pulled through that a knot is created that resembles a Bowline On A Bight but which slips.
I am trying to understand what you mean by "wrong bight is pulled".
...
Knotsaver got it.  You need to look not at the finished
but the inchoate knot : by some tying methods, one
forms an overhand knot and then pulls the appropriate
bight into the to-become-eye, et cetera --and pull the
wrong one ("It is either exactly right or hopelessly wrong" (!!))
and you end up with a pile hitch noose (which one can
also get if the bowline capsizes).

--dl*
====

knotsaver

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Re: Slipping Bowline On A Bight
« Reply #4 on: April 24, 2018, 02:00:56 PM »
On tying a Bowline On A Bight, I noticed that if the wrong bight is pulled through that a knot is created that resembles a Bowline On A Bight but which slips. It looks like it might be a useful knot in some settings. I am curious to know whether this is a documented knot and whether it has a name.

...if used for attaching hooks, rings...that is a (version of the) Palomar Knot!
Ciao,
s.
« Last Edit: April 24, 2018, 02:02:15 PM by knotsaver »