Author Topic: How do you tie a deboned lamb leg?  (Read 1727 times)

Hrungnir

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How do you tie a deboned lamb leg?
« on: November 20, 2017, 06:53:37 PM »
This is what we are working with. The bone is cut out. We put som garlic, rosemary, thyme and parsley on it as filling. Then we role the whole thing, and tie it together.



The most common way to tie is together, is half hitching the whole thing like this:


Perhaps I don't have enough practice, but it might be difficult to get a string on every part sticking up. Maybe you mess up or miss something. Perhaps your twine got too much slack somewhere and it is difficult to pull it tight together. Perhaps you got slack, because the twine moved somewhere.

Tying a net is overkill for this job.

How I solved this was using several pieces of twine. I couldn't get it tight enough with the Reef Knot, but the Surgeons Knot was awesome for this job. I haven't tried the Butchers Knot, but I imagine that would work well too.

How would you tie up the lamb leg? Could the same method be used to tie up a bird for roasting (duck, chicken)?



Hrungnir

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Re: How do you tie a deboned lamb leg?
« Reply #1 on: December 04, 2017, 06:22:54 PM »
No one here took the job of tying up the turkey on Thanksgiving? :o

JohnC

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Re: How do you tie a deboned lamb leg?
« Reply #2 on: December 05, 2017, 05:41:24 AM »
Perhaps they are all vegetarians.

I always wonder how come the string doesn't catch fire in the oven and act like a wick for all the fat and burn your house down.
John

struktor

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Re: How do you tie a deboned lamb leg?
« Reply #3 on: December 05, 2017, 12:29:40 PM »
Tying a rolled pork loin
https://youtu.be/hz-AWLdvjMg

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Smoke point
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smoke_point

roo

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Re: How do you tie a deboned lamb leg?
« Reply #4 on: December 05, 2017, 07:13:31 PM »
Perhaps they are all vegetarians.

I always wonder how come the string doesn't catch fire in the oven and act like a wick for all the fat and burn your house down.
Not many have lamb for Thanksgiving.

The string doesn't catch fire because it likely has some juices on it that keep it below the boiling point until everything dries out.  Also, the oven is likely below the auto-ignition temperature for the string.

If there ever was a flare-up, the oven could easily contain a small flame without a problem.
« Last Edit: December 05, 2017, 08:42:26 PM by roo »
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Hrungnir

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Re: How do you tie a deboned lamb leg?
« Reply #5 on: December 06, 2017, 02:50:10 PM »
Tying a rolled pork loin
https://youtu.be/hz-AWLdvjMg


Nice video! Especially the ending of the video, where they tie the bitter end to every loop is something I have never seen before (perhaps this is for avoiding the string from moving around? I haven't seen the video with sound yet).

However the pork loin seems a lot more manageable in comparison to the lamb leg. Much smaller and lighter, so the pressure against the twine and the knot become less too. My issue with the half hitches and the over hand was that the knots didn't have enough resistant, and that's why surgeons knot was more suited for me. I wonder hower if there is a way to add more resistance to the half hitches. Like an extra turn or two.

I also didn't remove the sirloin, so the lamb leg became a lot thicker and heavier in one end than the other.




Hrungnir

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Re: How do you tie a deboned lamb leg?
« Reply #6 on: December 06, 2017, 02:51:06 PM »
Perhaps they are all vegetarians.

I always wonder how come the string doesn't catch fire in the oven and act like a wick for all the fat and burn your house down.
Not many have lamb for Thanksgiving.

Feel free to tell us how you tied your turkey then  ;D

struktor

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Re: How do you tie a deboned lamb leg?
« Reply #7 on: December 06, 2017, 10:15:18 PM »

Hrungnir

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Re: How do you tie a deboned lamb leg?
« Reply #8 on: December 07, 2017, 08:52:02 AM »
Tying a Leg of Lamb
https://youtu.be/1Ev6sSSVUX8?t=1m50s

Nice! I see that he starts with a Surgeons Knot!  ;D

I need to practice on the half hitches, and pull every one of them tight as he does, in the video it seems to hold a bit, but I need to try and see for myself. I haven't done the passing under either, so there are some great ideas to improve my last lamb leg tying  8)

Dan_Lehman

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Re: How do you tie a deboned lamb leg?
« Reply #9 on: December 09, 2017, 08:53:02 PM »
... half hitching the whole thing ...
///
I need to practice on the half hitches, ...
Rather, on marline hitches, NOT h-h --the ends leading
fore/aft pass under other parts (and are thus nipped).

--dl*
====

Hrungnir

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Re: How do you tie a deboned lamb leg?
« Reply #10 on: December 10, 2017, 12:42:02 PM »
... half hitching the whole thing ...
///
I need to practice on the half hitches, ...
Rather, on marline hitches, NOT h-h --the ends leading
fore/aft pass under other parts (and are thus nipped).

--dl*
====

The Marline Hitches is a good idea on those large pieces of meat. Thanks!


On those really heavy and difficult pieces of meat, I see there is double marline hitches. I wonder if these becomes too complicatated to tie on a big piece of meat with such a thin string.


An alternative could be using the marline hitch with double overhands instead of single overhands?
« Last Edit: December 10, 2017, 02:04:35 PM by Hrungnir »

Dan_Lehman

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Re: How do you tie a deboned lamb leg?
« Reply #11 on: December 10, 2017, 10:26:30 PM »
The Marline Hitches is a good idea on those large pieces of meat. Thanks!
Um, the ... is what is SHOWN there --that was my point.

Now, to be fancy, they could be --less easily, but ...--
Gleipnirs !


 ;)