Author Topic: Siberian Hitch  (Read 18869 times)

roo

  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1860
    • The Notable Knot Index
Siberian Hitch
« on: October 23, 2006, 06:40:26 PM »
I don't recall ever coming across a Siberian Hitch, so I'm asking y'all about it on behalf of a gentleman who asked me about it.  I get the impression he may have seen it on a video or TV show.

Apparently, it can apply or hold tension, as when tying a tarp over a load, can be tied one handed, and be released with a single pull of a free end.

Has anyone here seen it?
« Last Edit: February 19, 2009, 08:36:17 PM by roo »
If you wish to add a troll to your ignore list, click "Profile" then "Buddies/Ignore List".


Fairlead

  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 334
  • IGKT Member since 1984 - IGKT Librarian
Re: Siberian Hitch
« Reply #1 on: October 23, 2006, 09:39:54 PM »
Hi Roo,
As with all second hand messages - the facts can get a bit distorted - however, I think this may be the knot depicted in the Ray Mears series of 'bushcraft' programmes on TV (and great they were too!).  Ray uses the "Evenk overhand hitch" as he calls it,  and in one of his books the caption to this knot reads as follows:
"In Siberia, nomadic reindeer-hearders employ quickly-tied release knots to minimise the time their fingers are exposed to the cold.  These knots are very useful".
The result is nothing more than a slipped overhand noose around a vertical post (tree etc).
Ray also uses this knot to secure a ridge-line between trees to support a tarp.

Gordon

roo

  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1860
    • The Notable Knot Index
Re: Siberian Hitch
« Reply #2 on: October 23, 2006, 10:06:47 PM »
Hi Roo,
As with all second hand messages - the facts can get a bit distorted - however, I think this may be the knot depicted in the Ray Mears series of 'bushcraft' programmes on TV (and great they were too!).  Ray uses the "Evenk overhand hitch" as he calls it,  and in one of his books the caption to this knot reads as follows:
"In Siberia, nomadic reindeer-hearders employ quickly-tied release knots to minimise the time their fingers are exposed to the cold.  These knots are very useful".
The result is nothing more than a slipped overhand noose around a vertical post (tree etc).
Ray also uses this knot to secure a ridge-line between trees to support a tarp.

Gordon

Much obliged.  I'll relay your info.
If you wish to add a troll to your ignore list, click "Profile" then "Buddies/Ignore List".


Willeke

  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 433
  • knopen . ismijnhobby . nl
    • Willeke's knotted Ideas
Re: Siberian Hitch
« Reply #3 on: October 23, 2006, 10:07:45 PM »
I think Gordon might well be right on the tv programme it came from, if so I think it might be the same knot as we discused in this topic: http://igkt.net/sm/index.php?topic=424.0

Willeke
"Never underestimate what a simple person can do with clever tools,
nor what a clever person can do with simple tools." - Ian Fieggen

Writer of A booklet on lanyards, available from IGKT supplies.

Fairlead

  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 334
  • IGKT Member since 1984 - IGKT Librarian
Re: Siberian Hitch
« Reply #4 on: October 31, 2006, 10:46:48 PM »
Roo,
Show your friend this URL
http://www.outdooridiots.com/features/200606/pitchingatarp/pitchingatarp4.asp

detailed tying instructions for the Evank (Siberian) hitch

Gordon

Transminator

  • Exp. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 144
Re: Siberian Hitch
« Reply #5 on: June 08, 2010, 12:35:03 PM »
A clear video on youtube shows how to tie this Siberian Hitch/Evenk knot:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h4T0IUjsDs8

roo

  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1860
    • The Notable Knot Index
Re: Siberian Hitch
« Reply #6 on: June 08, 2010, 03:01:34 PM »
A clear video on youtube shows how to tie this Siberian Hitch/Evenk knot:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h4T0IUjsDs8
I don't usually do youtube, but I think the hitch referred to in this old thread can now be found on the web in images.  It appears to be a Halter Hitch with an extra twist of the receiver bight before the tuck of the slip bight into that receiver bight.  It makes me wonder if it's of Siberian origin at all.  It's fairly stable, but not quite as secure and stable as a Slipped Buntline.

« Last Edit: June 08, 2010, 03:02:46 PM by roo »
If you wish to add a troll to your ignore list, click "Profile" then "Buddies/Ignore List".


knot4u

  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1076
Re: Siberian Hitch
« Reply #7 on: June 08, 2010, 05:50:02 PM »
Both the Siberian and the slipped buntline are great.  I alternate between the two depending on my mood.

In my experience, a Siberian will not slip when there is tension in the standing end, and the Siberian doesn't even have to be dressed correctly while it prevents slippage.  On the other hand, the slipped buntline does hold tighter than the Siberian once there is no longer tension on the standing end.  This issue is irrelevant for everything I've done so far, and the advantage here may go to the Siberian depending on the application.  I currently have a few trucker's hitches, anchored with Siberian hitches, supporting trees in my backyard.  After many strong winds in all directions, the Siberian hitches are holding stronger than when I tied them.

For me, a Siberian has some advantages over a slipped buntline:

-I can tie a Siberian if the object (e.g., pole) is 20 feet up there and I'm way down here on the ground.  For example, I can tie the Siberian down here and pull the standing end so that the Siberian holds tight against the object.  The Siberian is basically a slip loop around the object.  Some Youtube videos display how this feature works.  On the other hand, in my experience, a slipped buntline needs to be worked with both hands all the way up to the object.  The slipped buntline is basically a slipped clove hitch around the standing end.

-The Siberian is easier to tie, and I can easily tie the Siberian with thick gloves on.
« Last Edit: June 08, 2010, 06:17:36 PM by knot4u »

roo

  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1860
    • The Notable Knot Index
Re: Siberian Hitch
« Reply #8 on: June 08, 2010, 06:07:40 PM »
In my experience, a Siberian will not slip when there is tension in the standing end, and the Siberian doesn't even have to be dressed correctly while it prevents slippage.  However, the slipped buntline does hold tighter than the Siberian once there is no longer tension on the standing end.  This issue is irrelevant for everything I've done so far, and the advantage here may go to the Siberian depending on the application.
Why would the advantage "here" go to the Siberian/Modified Halter if you admit that the Slipped Buntline form is more stable?


Quote
-You can tie a Siberian if the object (e.g., pole) is way up there and you're way down here.  For example, you can tie the Siberian down here and just pull the Siberian up to the object tight because the Siberian is a slip-type knot.  Some Youtube videos display how this feature can work.  In my experience, a slipped buntline needs to be worked with both hands all the way up to the object because it's a clove-type knot.
I don't find this to be an issue.  Perhaps you're making things too tight.

Quote
-The Siberian is easier to tie, and you can easily tie the Siberian with thick gloves on.
I can tie both with gloves on.  While it may be fun to tie the Siberian Hitch or Modified Halter Hitch via the gimmick shown, you'd better learn alternate methods if you're intent on using it often.  There are times when you won't have full and free use of both hands or you may be facing the rope in an unusual position.  Then, the gimmick will fail you.

I would suggest learning various ways of tying the Halter Hitch and then the Modified Halter Hitch to round out your abilities.  I also find that the gimmick method uses more rope than is necessary (not that this necessarily negates its use in all circumstances).
« Last Edit: June 08, 2010, 06:10:27 PM by roo »
If you wish to add a troll to your ignore list, click "Profile" then "Buddies/Ignore List".


knot4u

  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1076
Re: Siberian Hitch
« Reply #9 on: June 08, 2010, 06:15:36 PM »
Well, what I said above is my experience with these two hitches (Siberian and slipped buntline), and I use both extensively.  Take it or leave it.  My experience is not inconsistent with what others say about these hitches.  By the way, I edited my post above to be more clear.
« Last Edit: June 08, 2010, 06:16:31 PM by knot4u »

knot4u

  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1076
Re: Siberian Hitch
« Reply #10 on: June 08, 2010, 06:40:11 PM »
In my experience, a Siberian will not slip when there is tension in the standing end, and the Siberian doesn't even have to be dressed correctly while it prevents slippage.  However, the slipped buntline does hold tighter than the Siberian once there is no longer tension on the standing end.  This issue is irrelevant for everything I've done so far, and the advantage here may go to the Siberian depending on the application.
Why would the advantage "here" go to the Siberian/Modified Halter if you admit that the Slipped Buntline form is more stable?

The operative words are "depending on the application."  If you must need the hitch to hold tight once once tension is released from the standing end, then the slipped buntline is the way to go.  If not, then the Siberian may be advantageous.  An example is if you need to move the hitch along the object.  With the Siberian, you would release the tension from the standing end, slightly loosen the Siberian and then move the hitch as desired.  In this situation, the slipped buntline may need to be completely untied, depending on the object and the type of rope used.

Quote
-You can tie a Siberian if the object (e.g., pole) is way up there and you're way down here.  For example, you can tie the Siberian down here and just pull the Siberian up to the object tight because the Siberian is a slip-type knot.  Some Youtube videos display how this feature can work.  In my experience, a slipped buntline needs to be worked with both hands all the way up to the object because it's a clove-type knot.
I don't find this to be an issue.  Perhaps you're making things too tight.

No, I'm not making things too tight.  To clarify, if my object is 30 feet up there, and I'm way down here, then I'll be using a Siberian and not a slipped buntline.

Quote
-The Siberian is easier to tie, and you can easily tie the Siberian with thick gloves on.
I can tie both with gloves on.  While it may be fun to tie the Siberian Hitch or Modified Halter Hitch via the gimmick shown, you'd better learn alternate methods if you're intent on using it often.  There are times when you won't have full and free use of both hands or you may be facing the rope in an unusual position.  Then, the gimmick will fail you.

I would suggest learning various ways of tying the Halter Hitch and then the Modified Halter Hitch to round out your abilities.  I also find that the gimmick method uses more rope than is necessary (not that this necessarily negates its use in all circumstances).

I'm not sure what gimmick you're talking about.  Anyway, for me, a Siberian is easier to tie with gloves on.
« Last Edit: June 08, 2010, 06:45:15 PM by knot4u »

Dan_Lehman

  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3959
Re: Siberian Hitch
« Reply #11 on: June 08, 2010, 06:44:23 PM »
-The Siberian is easier to tie, and I can easily tie the Siberian with thick gloves on.

But why not just tie a Bowline around the line, which is more stable
when slack?  (These are, btw, "running" eye knots, not hitches, strictly put.)
As for a Buntline hitch, that doesn't work so well on relatively wide objects,
nor will is slide into position as easily as a running eye (which won't work
so well on relatively narrow objects ("rings").)

--dl*
====

roo

  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1860
    • The Notable Knot Index
Re: Siberian Hitch
« Reply #12 on: June 08, 2010, 06:47:40 PM »
  To clarify, if my object is 30 feet up there, and I'm way down here, then I'll be using a Siberian and not a slipped buntline.
I am able to make a Slipped Buntline travel up to the object easily, as long as I don't try to cinch it tight first.

Quote
I'm not sure what gimmick you're talking about.
 
The method shown in the video where you have to make a coil around two fingers first.
If you wish to add a troll to your ignore list, click "Profile" then "Buddies/Ignore List".


knot4u

  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1076
Re: Siberian Hitch
« Reply #13 on: June 08, 2010, 06:53:10 PM »
-The Siberian is easier to tie, and I can easily tie the Siberian with thick gloves on.

But why not just tie a Bowline around the line, which is more stable
when slack?  (These are, btw, "running" eye knots, not hitches, strictly put.)
As for a Buntline hitch, that doesn't work so well on relatively wide objects,
nor will is slide into position as easily as a running eye (which won't work
so well on relatively narrow objects ("rings").)

--dl*
====

The Siberian is nothing like a bowline.  A Siberian is a hitch that only gets tighter against the object as tension in the standing end increases.  However, once tension is completely released, the grip around the object is not so tight.  For that reason, the Siberian is also different than the slipped buntline.

As I said above, I use both the slipped buntline and the Siberian.  The Siberian sometimes serves my purposes better.  Further, if I had to choose one, then I'll choose the Siberian because the Siberian will do everything the slipped buntline will do for my purposes, except there are some advantages (discussed above) of the Siberian that are more valuable to me.
« Last Edit: June 08, 2010, 06:54:40 PM by knot4u »

roo

  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1860
    • The Notable Knot Index
Re: Siberian Hitch
« Reply #14 on: June 08, 2010, 06:54:02 PM »
-The Siberian is easier to tie, and I can easily tie the Siberian with thick gloves on.

But why not just tie a Bowline around the line, which is more stable
when slack?  
I can imagine that he'll reply that he can't untie the (running) bowline from a distance.  However, it brings to mind a solution using running loops.  Specifically, a loop on the bight is tied on the ground.  Next, one end of the rope is thrown over the branch.  Then, that same end is sent through the loop to make a running loop which will shrink to the branch.  The other end of the rope can then be used to "unshrink" the same running loop.
« Last Edit: June 08, 2010, 06:54:45 PM by roo »
If you wish to add a troll to your ignore list, click "Profile" then "Buddies/Ignore List".