Author Topic: rope, fire and safety  (Read 14732 times)

KnotNow!

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Re: rope, fire and safety
« Reply #15 on: October 22, 2006, 06:04:22 AM »
Hi,
  In the Telephone Industry we fuse glass fibers.... but we do it for light tranmission, not strenght.  I use heat to fuse the braid of synthetic cord to make it solid, often to help in tucking and end or often to finish ends when the knot is done.  I just used heat to fuse the tapered yarns of a eye splice... so not long threads could stick out and no short threads could pull into the splice.. but...  As an end to end joining.. a true splice... I can see no way get much tensile strength.  It is an tempting idea.  I may make up a long splice in some of the 7mm "stinkum" cord we have here and at the junction of two strands I try to fuse them with heat.  Then I might try to destroy the splice, to see what I get.  My guess is that fused ends do not transmit load up the thread, yarn and strand far enough to take advantage of the friction within a thread, yarn and strand.  Have you watched rope fail?  Friction is a big factor as to why rope works in the first instance.  This is why there is a length where the long splice works no matter how sloppy you make your tucks.  I suspect we could join two lines, carefull sheared to 90 degrees and fuse them to melt into the line for several turns and perhaps have a homonogous splice.  However since the line relies on flex and transfer of forces through friction to be strong.. I think it will still break.  A good avenue to explore.  I am sure Carol was just fusing the end of the cord to prevent unraveling.  The ever present zippo back splice.  But it sent me to thinking....
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Willeke

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Re: rope, fire and safety
« Reply #16 on: October 22, 2006, 09:41:18 AM »
What I missed in the replies so far, (or did I overlook it?) is that in many cases it is posible to use sticky tape. When working it will keep the ends of most kinds of string sealed. When applied right it does not need to make the string thicker by much, sometimes it even reduces the size of the string. Apply one and a bit, or two layers, of tape, well streched and under tension, before cutting the string.
It is no solution at the end of a project, but it should halve the need to melt.

Willeke
"Never underestimate what a simple person can do with clever tools,
nor what a clever person can do with simple tools." - Ian Fieggen

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