Author Topic: The Figure-Eight Loom for Paracord storage  (Read 3288 times)

asemery

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The Figure-Eight Loom for Paracord storage
« on: October 29, 2015, 07:55:14 PM »
There are many ways to store paracord to prevent tangles and allow easy access to the cord

For shorter lengths the daisy chain is easy to set up and deploy
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EhzdCzFp9aY

For longer bits the doughnut makes a very attractive compact bundle but it takes a long time to set up.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IG8x3Lku63I

I prefer the figure-eight lay out. It is easy to set up and easy to pull out exactly the amount that you need.   This is usually tied around the thump and forefinger but I made a loom by drilling peg size holes in a piece of scrap lumber and placing a tie off (eye screw) a few inches away from the first hole.   Board extends another few inches to right with another hole.


One peg goes in the first hole. By changing  the position of the other peg I can adjust the size of the Figure -Eight.  I will not  show here how to make the figure-eight.  Google to find many links


You can keep the loops on the loom when tying off the Working End.  To deploy just pull on the end that was tied onto the eye screw.

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Using the loom to make flaking coils. 
If you google "flaking a rope" you will find that the procedure is used by both sailors and rock climbers to keep coils of rope untangled and ready for instant access.  Here is a way to do the same with paracord so that the whole length is readily available. 

Leaving a 6" or so long tail wrap cord a couple of times around tie off point and bring cord to right up side A.


Bring cord to left crossing over to side A.


Bring cord to right up side B (do NOT cross over).


Now bring cord to left over to side B.


Continue in  this manner - straight going from left to right and crossing over going from right to left.






When loom is full remove loops from right hand peg.


Grab the cords one hand at 1 and the other at 2 and gently pull apart - this will separate the cords at left hand peg. 


Fold the bundle in half and wrap the tag end around and secure with half hitch. 

To access cord undo the wrapping, hold the tag end and drop or toss the bundle into a empty (cat free) area

Mobius

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Re: The Figure-Eight Loom for Paracord storage
« Reply #1 on: November 01, 2015, 12:59:28 AM »
Hi asemery,

Is the flaking pattern important? Some sites do figure 8's while another advocated a random approach. I like your pattern,  just wondered  how Important you  felt it is.

Cheers,

mobius

asemery

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Re: The Figure-Eight Loom for Paracord storage
« Reply #2 on: November 01, 2015, 01:10:09 AM »
Hi asemery,

Is the flaking pattern important? Some sites do figure 8's while another advocated a random approach. I like your pattern,  just wondered  how Important you  felt it is.

Cheers,

mobius
The flaking pattern shown is known as the "butterfly".  When you take the loops off the loom and spread them apart you get overlapping "Figure-eights".
It is similar to the approach to the butterfly coiling that climbers use to stow their ropes. 

Z

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Re: The Figure-Eight Loom for Paracord storage
« Reply #3 on: November 01, 2015, 01:21:53 PM »
Hi asemery,

Is the flaking pattern important? Some sites do figure 8's while another advocated a random approach. I like your pattern,  just wondered  how Important you  felt it is.

Cheers,

mobius

The importance depends on the length of the cordage. If the paracord is like 8 feet long. I would do this for practice to keep my skill, but it would be not that important as a practical matter. If the paracord is 100 feet, then the importance increases proportionally.
If you're reading this, it's too late.

Mobius

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Re: The Figure-Eight Loom for Paracord storage
« Reply #4 on: November 01, 2015, 02:07:50 PM »
Thanks for the feedback

Groundline

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Re: The Figure-Eight Loom for Paracord storage
« Reply #5 on: November 01, 2015, 09:18:07 PM »
I carry two of these with me at all times, one is left handed the other right.

Dan_Lehman

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Re: The Figure-Eight Loom for Paracord storage
« Reply #6 on: November 05, 2015, 07:18:58 AM »
Hi asemery,

Is the flaking pattern important? Some sites do figure 8's while another advocated a random approach. I like your pattern,  just wondered  how Important you  felt it is.

Cheers,

mobius

The importance depends on the length of the cordage. If the paracord is like 8 feet long. I would do this for practice to keep my skill, but it would be not that important as a practical matter. If the paracord is 100 feet, then the importance increases proportionally.
Quote
rock climbers to keep coils of rope untangled and ready for instant access
What rockclimbers often do is much simpler :: they use
a "stuff bag" and just stuff the rope into it, and --surprise?--
it will feed out w/o tangles.  Oh, rope-rescue folks do this,
too, IIRC, and might be tossing the bag to a victim.  And
this of course will be with fairly long lengths.


--dl*
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« Last Edit: November 06, 2015, 07:43:56 PM by Dan_Lehman »

asemery

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Re: The Figure-Eight Loom for Paracord storage
« Reply #7 on: November 05, 2015, 11:44:57 PM »
The light-weight nature of the paracord I have dealt with causes it to tangle soon after removing it from its original packaging.  I buy the cord at local hobby/craft chains and it is NOT military grade.  Some degree of neatness is needed to store it.  Tony

Z

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Re: The Figure-Eight Loom for Paracord storage
« Reply #8 on: November 06, 2015, 05:15:16 PM »
The flaking (butterfly) is more useful for climbing rope. It makes it easier to release the bundle from your neck after coiling. For smaller cordage, like paracord, I don't see the point. The straight Figure 8 in your upper photos is more useful.
If you're reading this, it's too late.