Author Topic: Events Around the UK  (Read 2331 times)

JD

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Events Around the UK
« on: January 18, 2011, 04:15:11 PM »
I am now sick of the cold and looking forward to the warmer weather!! As a result of this I am now looking around to see where there will be interesting events (especially Knot orientated) around the UK.

So if you know of any events that may be of interest, please let me, and the rest of us know via this forum.


KenY

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Re: Events Around the UK
« Reply #1 on: January 20, 2011, 10:21:11 AM »
Johnny,

It will still be dark and cold,but the Solent Branch will be meeting on Feb 8th in Fareham, I shall copy you the details.

We can even have a muster of ditty bags just for you, not to mention the battery of sunshine smiles to greet you.

So re- jig your appointments for that day, it will be a good start for the year.

Yours Aye

Ken.

JD

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Re: Events Around the UK
« Reply #2 on: February 09, 2011, 04:05:34 PM »
And and excellent meeting it was too, a very good start to the year of knotting experiences!!

I learnt a new knot, won the raffle and had some fun..............many thanks!!

Oh yes I also learnt about blind holes bulls eyes and round thimbles.

So I take it that round thing in the photo is a round eye and not a bulls eye?






squarerigger

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Re: Events Around the UK
« Reply #3 on: February 09, 2011, 11:19:57 PM »
Johnny,

Congrats on your achievement!  I feel sure you meant to say round thimble so, yes, it is a round thimble.

SR

KenY

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Re: Events Around the UK
« Reply #4 on: February 10, 2011, 01:43:15 PM »
Hi Johnny,
Thank you for turning up. I do hope your falcon is still secure to your table leg.

As to the image you have posted, it is a double Common Block, not that it is common just that it has no iron inside it, but as we agreed,the best part of knot tying is the' hands on' bit. I would love to get my hands on the block, not so I can pinch it but so I can look for a tally plate, that would give me the makers name and the date, I would need a closer look at the sheaves and the gromet as well.
I can confirm, Squareriggers two penneth, (Lindsey you had to be there, we had been discussing the merits of Dead eyes and Bull's eyes, and Johnny said" I have got this at home what is it?" So I would say, a round open thimble (with rust).
The hook- the funny end looks like it is the remnants of wire mousing, a good seamanship practice long in use before the 'Health and Safty Act " removed common sense and introduced a mound of paper work.

Ken. 

squarerigger

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Re: Events Around the UK
« Reply #5 on: February 10, 2011, 04:13:11 PM »
Ken and Johnny,

SO much more there to see - thanks Ken, yes it is an open round thimble, which brings up the age of the thimble - I believe (could be mistaken) it is from around 1970/80 or so at which time thimbles were made in China and India like this instead of being welded or forged closed into a perfect circle.  Also, the presence of the short splice across the base of the block reminds us that our practice (here in California) for stropping stropped blocks is to use a perfectly-sized grommet - something this maker was not practiced in perhaps?  The length of the seizing (too short in coverage and not close enough to either block or thimble - that bad boy could pop right out!) and the fact that the line used for the strop is not overly stretched reminds me that some folks would opt for a 'quick-and-dirty' rather than do the job correctly - this one may not have seen much service?  Last, but by no means least a close examination could reveal some maker's mark as you say Ken, but also would reveal more about the actual construction of the shell (carved from one piece or assembled from separate pieces - is that a chafe mark on the right cheek?) and the material of the sheaves themselves and their pattern of wear - so many stories in each block and an interesting find - nice stuff!  Heigh-ho - back to work I go!

Cheers!

SR

JD

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Re: Events Around the UK
« Reply #6 on: February 10, 2011, 04:56:17 PM »
I have now had a closer look at the block and can report back the following:

There are lots of holes where the woodworm or some other exotic marine creature has had a go at it.

Close inspection reveals that there is a number 7 stamped in the block. There also appears to be the "Pussers Arrow" stamped into it.

It would appear that it has had very little use, as there is no significant signs of chaffing. The damage is probably from being thrown out!
« Last Edit: February 10, 2011, 05:02:04 PM by JohnnyDebt »