Author Topic: Compact loop on a bight!?  (Read 14072 times)

knudeNoggin

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Re: Compact loop on a bight!?
« Reply #15 on: September 28, 2006, 05:40:21 PM »
In the version of the Blood knot I  tie, the wraps are only around the opposite SPart i.e. a single diameter.

This is one way to tie the knot, but if made in the usual materials for it (i.e., in
some fishline), the successive turns of the SParts will move out into the wraps
of the end and result in the form with wraps around the opposed SParts.  (In Barnes's
terms, "outcoil" & "incoil" tying methods.)

Quote
Other knots such as the carrick have a greater symmetry

Let's not get tricked by the name:  with the Carrick, there is usually the open,
lattice-like form shown as a way to tie it (sometimes it is tied by forming a kind of
crossing knot (aka Munter hitch) in one side into which the other rope is tied),
but the usual capsized/collapsed form which is only singly symmetric.

*knudeNoggin*

DerekSmith

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Re: Compact loop on a bight!?
« Reply #16 on: September 28, 2006, 08:15:54 PM »
Other knots such as the carrick have a greater symmetry

Let's not get tricked by the name:  with the Carrick, there is usually the open,
lattice-like form shown as a way to tie it (sometimes it is tied by forming a kind of
crossing knot (aka Munter hitch) in one side into which the other rope is tied),
but the usual capsized/collapsed form which is only singly symmetric.

*knudeNoggin*

Jeez - OK, I agree, lets not get tricked by the name: nor sidetracked by it, nor sidetracked by capsizing it into a different form.



This knot - whatever you call it - in the form in which it is displayed has double symmetry.

It can be flipped on the vertical axis or flipped on the horizontal axis and remain identical - it has symmetry in two dimensions.

Derek