Author Topic: Bulls-eye hitch  (Read 1249 times)

enhaut

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Bulls-eye hitch
« on: April 04, 2015, 07:37:49 PM »
The Bull's-eye hitch

This hitch evolved from this thread;

http://igkt.net/sm/index.php?topic=5250.msg34366#msg34366

where an attempt was made regarding an hitch who can withstand load on either of its working ends. The first try was a miss my second trial scored!
Quoting Xarax; "Believe it or not, I do not remember if I had seen it somewhere, or if I had actually tied this most simple and tight hitch, ever.."

The name Bull's eye hitch seems adequate considering the formation of the knot itself and its next of kin; the Bull Overhand hitch.

enhaut

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Re: Bulls-eye hitch
« Reply #1 on: April 04, 2015, 11:22:52 PM »
I suggested that we named the hitch based on a fig-8 (pretzel) the Bull's-eye hitch  and as you suggested the one base on the overhand knot the Bull overhand hitch.

So we have the Bull overhand bitch and the Bull's-eye hitch a perfect matchup.

Quote
And I can not even see how one would be able to perform such an experiment

I use a pull-buoy made of compresible material to observe to a certain degre the amount of force an hitch can give. I once placed a cat's paws binder on this contraption for a whole week to verify its gripping power.
On the pictures shown the binder is in direct contact with the pull-buoy which I dont permit in a real experimentation it is always a good idea to protect the material, there is plenty ways to preserve the surface but it's not the place to discuss that.
edit 1= with a ruler one can observe (in the case of comparing binders) the lenght of the rope being grabbed; a shorter  lenght will show a stronger binder

Picture 1 = the Pull-buoy with the Bull overhand hitch in place

Picture 2 = The Bull overhand hitch at work
« Last Edit: April 05, 2015, 12:05:40 AM by enhaut »

enhaut

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Re: Bulls-eye hitch
« Reply #2 on: April 05, 2015, 12:59:44 AM »
Quote
I understand that you observe how deep into the body of those buoys the wraps of the hitch can penetrate, before the locking mechanism releases some amount of rope length.
I did the first time I tried this method but not anymore, now I protect the material using pieces of woods in between the ropes and the pull-buoy (not shown in my pictures).
The process you describe is easily attainable with  modern machinery ( think of an scissor jack)

Regarding the test shown in my pictures with the pull buoy;
It has to be said that I did not exert much torque on the binder; the pull-buoy would have been ruined!
« Last Edit: April 05, 2015, 01:03:42 AM by enhaut »