Author Topic: Balance Knot  (Read 1747 times)

Bjoern_Hee

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Balance Knot
« on: March 12, 2014, 09:01:25 PM »
Here is a knot I have invented, or possibly reinvented (I have come to kind of expect that). For now I call it the "Balance Knot". I know some of you will hate this knot, but my hope is that some of you will find it interesting.

The balance knot is self-untying. That is, when the standing part(s) are untensioned, the knot falls apart. Some rope have a sort of memory though, and will need some shaking for the untying to take place. It is also close to ultimate in simplicity.

It can be used both for an eyeknot and for a bend.

Balance Loop

This is the easiest one to tie. Arrange the rope as you can see in the attachments. Hold both the standing part and working part in one hand, and pull away from the eye. Let the two strands slide through your fingers, such that when the working part leaves your fingers it is well tensioned. The working part should then swing out to approximately 90 degrees. If it is less (leaning away from the eye), then it is good. If it is more (leaning towards the eye), you should retie the knot. Exercise and you will get the feel for it.

If the standing part is not tensioned, you can use your free hand to give it tension. Remember, of course, to keep that tension after you have tied the knot.

The crossing knot closest to the eye could take on any of four mirrored forms. It doesn't matter much. It is the other crossing knot that takes the load.

Balance Bend

Arrange the rope as you can see in the attachments. Use both hands to hold the standing part and working part on each side of the knot-to-be. Pull your hands away from each other, sliding the strands through your fingers, keeping everything tensioned. For best results, let the standing parts slide less than the working parts. When the working parts swing out, they should get an angle of approximately 90 degrees or less. Expect this to require some exercise to get right.

For both knots, they are easiest to tie if the standing part(s) are somewhat tensioned already.

Be careful not to tie the crossing knots too close together. Instead of self-untying, your knot may instead transform into reversed half hitches.

Bjoern_Hee

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Re: Balance Knot
« Reply #1 on: March 12, 2014, 09:04:11 PM »
The balance knot is very dependent on the rope used. In some rope it will never work (very stiff rope). In some rope it will be quite weak. But in some it will be easy to tie and have a fair strength.

If the knot is weak, try doubling the part(s) that go through the crossing knot(s). That will strengthen the knot.

By the way, the balance loop, strengthened or not, is the one I have used the most. I use it for temporarily hanging things from a horisontal bar. Like shoes in their laces to get them off the floor, or swimming trunks for drying. The balance loop is not necessarily the best knot for that, but it works nicely and I enjoy using the knot.

In twisted rope the crossing knots will have a best chirality. I haven't tried to decide what that is. I am sure some of you have input on that.

Hope you liked it. Let me hear your comments.

Enjoy.

xarax

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Re: Balance Knot
« Reply #2 on: March 12, 2014, 10:42:00 PM »
  All those solutions are direct or on direct descendants of the Gleipnir - the problem is that we are not sure they offer anything more than the Gleipnir itself... The most important thing, as you have realized, is the balance. The most balanced simple solution I have encountered is shown in the case of an adjustable loop ( the Pretzel, Eskimo-like adjustable loop ) - because I have not been able yet to implement it in a pure one-nub binder knot.
   http://igkt.net/sm/index.php?topic=4464.msg28357#msg28357
   http://igkt.net/sm/index.php?topic=3315.msg19917#msg19917
   
   See the B bend, the bowline B bend, and the B binder, at : 

1. http://igkt.net/sm/index.php?topic=2871.0
2. http://igkt.net/sm/index.php?topic=4122.0



« Last Edit: March 12, 2014, 10:55:29 PM by xarax »
This is not a knot.

DerekSmith

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Re: Balance Knot
« Reply #3 on: March 13, 2014, 08:48:14 PM »
What a lovely example of first principles of knotting function and a demonstration of the power of the simple half hitch.

Ashley depicted half of your slipped bend in #172, the Bell Ringers knot, where the weight of the rope acted as the necessary tension to sustain the knot, yet allowed the rope to be easily recovered without fuss.  He also shows a similar construction in #238, the Linemans loop.

I often wish we could get away from the massively over engineered knots we develop today in favour of some of these little gems.  In doing so, I think we would all be able to more clearly see the heart of the functionality of a knot.

The Gleipner takes this basic functionality and adds a very simple stabilisation process, but at its heart is the simple functionality of the half hitch.

Keep them coming.

Derek

GeneJohnson

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Re: Balance Knot
« Reply #4 on: March 15, 2014, 02:53:13 AM »
I would like to add a comment to those that feel that the relevance of a new knot is dependent upon how it rates against existing knots.  A new knot doesn't have to"best" other knots in the same category.  If a new knot inspires, or is a building block or a spring-board toward the development if a more functional knot, than it will take its place in history.  "Every" new knot deserves it's proper respect, as well as the developer!  Good work,  Bjoern_Hee!

Best regards!

Gene Johnson


xarax

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Re: Balance Knot
« Reply #5 on: March 15, 2014, 07:44:17 AM »
...then it will take its place in history.

   Unfortunately perhaps, history is ungrateful - it forgets the steps, and remembers only the landings.

   I would like to add a comment to those that feel that the relevance of a new knot is dependent upon how it rates against existing knots.  A new knot doesn't have to"best" other knots in the same category.  If a new knot inspires, or is a building block or a spring-board toward the development if a more functional knot, then ... [it] deserves it's proper respect, as well as the developer ! 

+1 .

This is not a knot.