Author Topic: Water Bowline  (Read 3483 times)

Guy

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Water Bowline
« on: January 15, 2014, 07:13:21 PM »
Hi. This is my first post, so I hope I am not being obtuse.  I have difficulty conceptualizing knots when they are presented in diagram form so I try to remember them by pattern.  The water bowline as shown by Grog is formed with a clove hitch in hand and the line coming up through the hitch around the standing end and back through.  Before I saw that method I had tried to devise my own pneumonic under similar lines but must have become confused because I brought the line through the hitch the other way from "above" and it forms an interesting knot, but clearly not a water bowline.  Does anybody know what that knot is?

xarax

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Re: Water Bowline
« Reply #1 on: January 15, 2014, 08:42:55 PM »
   See pictures 11a - 11b, page 23, at :
   www.paci.com.au/downloads_public/knots/Bowlines_Analysis.pdf
 
   The Clove hitch-based nipping structure oriented this way, and the non-reversed-Constrictor-based one as well, have the tendency to jam.

   http://igkt.net/sm/index.php?topic=4332
   http://igkt.net/sm/index.php?topic=4347
   http://igkt.net/sm/index.php?topic=4507
« Last Edit: January 15, 2014, 08:44:14 PM by xarax »
This is not a knot.

Guy

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Re: Water Bowline
« Reply #2 on: January 15, 2014, 09:12:25 PM »
Wow that is some treatise!  Thank you very much, although I'm still not sure of the knot's name.  I'll have to peruse it carefully.

roo

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Re: Water Bowline
« Reply #3 on: January 16, 2014, 06:36:58 AM »
Hi. This is my first post, so I hope I am not being obtuse.  I have difficulty conceptualizing knots when they are presented in diagram form so I try to remember them by pattern.  The water bowline as shown by Grog is formed with a clove hitch in hand and the line coming up through the hitch around the standing end and back through.  Before I saw that method I had tried to devise my own pneumonic under similar lines but must have become confused because I brought the line through the hitch the other way from "above" and it forms an interesting knot, but clearly not a water bowline.  Does anybody know what that knot is?
Without a picture of your knot, I cannot identify it.  Once you see the Water Bowline as an extension of the one-handed twist method of a standard bowline, it becomes easy.  Try this:

http://notableknotindex.webs.com/waterbowline.html
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Dan_Lehman

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Re: Water Bowline
« Reply #4 on: January 17, 2014, 06:04:32 PM »
The water bowline as shown by Grog is formed with a clove hitch in hand and the line coming up through the hitch around the standing end and back through.  Before I saw that method I had tried to devise my own pneumonic under similar lines but must have become confused because I brought the line through the hitch the other way from "above" and it forms an interesting knot, but ...
A pneumonic might get you pneumonia; better
stick with mnemonics, which also has that tricky
pairing of unseemly consonants!   ;D

One can go in two directions from your words (and need
not run for the hills, but just ask ...!), with you either
taking the working end from going through the hitch
in the opposite direction to "collar" the eye leg instead
of the S.Part --which would make the knot a sort of
"water"'d-down version of the Eskimo bowline,
or one could continue to collar the S.Part, and thereby
reverse the orientation of the hitch,
which knot(s) Xarax has provided reference to (I'll guess).


--dl*
====

xarax

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Re: Water Bowline
« Reply #5 on: January 22, 2014, 04:07:58 PM »
..either taking the working end from going through the hitch in the opposite direction to "collar" the eye leg instead of the S.Part --which would make the knot a sort of "water"'d-down version of the Eskimo bowline...

...or to "collar" no limb whatsoever, be it the Standing end or the returning eye leg, but the rim itself of the one of the two nipping loops forming the Clove hitch - which would make the knot a sort of a loop based on the "reversed Buntline hitch" :
   http://igkt.net/sm/index.php?topic=4332

   Unfortunately, as I said, the Clove hitch nipping structure, tied with this orientation, run the danger to jam. It would be safer ( regarding the danger of jamming, but not safer regarding the safety of the knot due to slippage ) to replace the Clove hitch with the Girth hitch... See such Girth-hitch-based "Eskimo"-like bowlines, at :
   http://igkt.net/sm/index.php?topic=4009
« Last Edit: January 22, 2014, 04:16:54 PM by xarax »
This is not a knot.