Author Topic: Racking Bowline  (Read 3814 times)

75RR

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Racking Bowline
« on: July 31, 2013, 04:06:48 PM »
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« Last Edit: August 18, 2013, 12:03:43 AM by 75RR »

roo

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Re: Racking Bowline
« Reply #1 on: July 31, 2013, 04:45:11 PM »
(Per 75RR's request for comment move...)

Hi 75RR,

I'm having some difficulty managing all the extra line involved here.  Did you have a specific application or situation in mind when you sketched up these loops?
« Last Edit: July 31, 2013, 07:39:34 PM by roo »
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X1

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Re: Racking Bowline
« Reply #2 on: July 31, 2013, 05:48:48 PM »
   This bowline seems pretty practical to me - but I know that "practicality" means different things to different people !
   It is very easy conceptually... I would say that it is the straightforward implementation of the over/under/over of the primordial warps and wefts locking idea - the parallel eye legs are the warps, and the Tail is the weft. However, I think that it will face problems with ring loading, or in cases where the angle between the eye does not remain constant all the time.
 

X1

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Re: Racking Bowline
« Reply #3 on: July 31, 2013, 07:09:27 PM »
   Right. You use the mechanism of a pick, well known to housewives tenths of thousands of years now, to dissipate the tensile forces acting on the Tail before you re-tuck it through the nipping turn for the last time. A practical way, no question about that, but quite bulky, and sensitive to ring loading.

roo

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Re: Racking Bowline
« Reply #4 on: July 31, 2013, 08:47:01 PM »
Did you have specific application or situation in mind when you sketched up these loops?
You mean apart from holding the weather leech?  ;)
No, that's fine.  Weather leech sounds almost as bad as a sharknado.   ;D
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X1

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Re: Racking Bowline
« Reply #5 on: August 03, 2013, 10:46:00 PM »
   An advice, coming from a self-appointed gatekeeper of the common sense...
   Use ropes of one colour only, without any multi-colour patterns on their surface. Your knot looks much more bulky and complex than it is already ! ( There are orange ropes for canyoning, which show nice, especially on a black background. If you wish to use a white background, so the pictures can be printed without consuming lots of ink, you can make the picture B&W, and then "tint" it with any colour you wish).

Dan_Lehman

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Re: Racking Bowline
« Reply #6 on: August 04, 2013, 03:51:53 AM »
A simple and proven method of bending ropes applied successfully to the Bowline.
Really?  Do you have any proof of "proven"?!
Frankly, I don't follow Ashley's assertion about the
knot drawing up all so well : it would do that job
much better were there not the between-bight-leg
parts of the bight-hitching line (which is how most
seizings work)!  Especially the finish Ashley shows
is pretty lame; a clove hitch with the tail then
tucked between bight legs would be better --of
course, he sh/could use the constrictor.

I think that you have here come up with a knot so
ugly that the Scott-lock'd bowline looks good & neat!
 ;D

But you are a hair away from a winning idea, IMO:
just wrap the tail around both eye legs --no in-betweens--
and then tuck it out through the turNip.  This,
at least, is the latest thing I've played around with,
and I think it looks good.  (Good if X. can put the
test with his slicker/newer kernmantle as a check.)

I find it easier to tie by first *reaching* and then
*wrapping back* to the nub for a simple, single
tuck --in contrast to *wrapping away* and then
feeding the line back beneath those wraps 'a la
blood knot / whipping.  And I've fiddled with going
left or right in the wraps; one direction might make
the final tuck come all so naturally.

For a shorter wrapping and maybe securer finish,
albeit less quickly done --requires further tucking--,
take the tail from its tuck through the turNip
back out through the wrap(s) --one might use fewer
if this additional securing it to be done.  This finish,
in briefest form, is just tying an overhand knot
through the nub; add a wrap and it becomes *doubled*
in the form of the fisherman's/anchor bend.
(Of course, a possible danger of finishing with the tail
on the eye side is that Agent_Smith will make a darn
Yoyo wrap & finish with that --as is his wont!   :D ]

I like that one can wrap and then haul on the tail
to tighten --not needing careful, in-the-making tightening
or much "working"; just the simple, final setting.

Anyway, the binding of the eye legs together will put
some bit of *closure* on the turNip to preclude
the usual loosening, and that's good.  The SPart can
feed through the collar, but it won't get sympathetic,
collaborating /assisting loosening from the eye.


--dl*
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SS369

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Re: Racking Bowline
« Reply #7 on: August 04, 2013, 01:53:04 PM »
Quote
I think that you have here come up with a knot so
ugly that the Scott-lock'd bowline looks good & neat!
 ;D

"Oh, the jealousy, the greed is the unraveling. It's the unraveling and it undoes all the joy that could be."
Joni - All I Want - 1971

 ;)

SS
« Last Edit: August 04, 2013, 01:53:56 PM by SS369 »

Dan_Lehman

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Re: Racking Bowline
« Reply #8 on: August 04, 2013, 06:13:32 PM »
Quote
I think that you have here come up with a knot so
ugly that the Scott-lock'd bowline looks good & neat!
 ;D

"Oh, the jealousy, the greed is the unraveling. It's the unraveling and it undoes all the joy that could be."
Joni - All I Want - 1971

 ;)

SS

+0.738152

But I think, in some concurrence w/X's point re diameters
(not knowing --at this writing-- about whether ... "TIB"!),
I'll take a version w/the extension nipping a pair of parts
(dang, the particular one I was just liking has escaped
my mind ...).  (The rope I was fiddling this with is an
older --retired-- gym rope : thick, resistant to bending
given its solidness, smooth but not slippery; 11mm-ish.
(Egadz, climbers speak in terms of 0.1 mm --hah!))


 ;)