Author Topic: tail length? hiding tail ?  (Read 1761 times)

Ruby

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tail length? hiding tail ?
« on: May 18, 2013, 05:19:20 AM »
how long should the knot's tail be ?

some said the tail should be 6 inches at least?

maybe sometimes long tails cause some problem?

how about just hiding the tail into the knot's nub?

« Last Edit: November 22, 2014, 02:56:56 AM by Ruby »

knot4u

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Re: tail length? hiding tail ?
« Reply #1 on: May 18, 2013, 04:18:46 PM »
how long should the knot's tail be ?

The tail length depends on the application. What is the application, rope specification, etc.?

6 inches is way too long for many things I do with paracord or shoe strings.  6 inches seems about right for things I do with larger cordage.  6 inches is too short for some climbing knots.  The working end on fishing knots are cut to have a tail that is about flush with the knot. So, the answer is, it depends!

roo

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Re: tail length? hiding tail ?
« Reply #2 on: May 18, 2013, 07:13:53 PM »
how long should the knot's tail be ?

I think some sort of rule of thumb by knot type and rope circumference or diameter would be useful.
If you test knots as you should, you can get a feel of how much excess rope is appropriate for the circumstance.

Something to keep in mind with excess rope length is that not only does it provide slither allowance as the knot is shaken, but it provides weight that helps retighten the knot should it become loose.
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knot4u

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Re: tail length? hiding tail ?
« Reply #3 on: May 18, 2013, 09:13:08 PM »
If you test knots as you should, you can get a feel of how much excess rope is appropriate for the circumstance.

That reminds me, is there a standardized testing method or consensus? I haven't come across one.
Also it would seem to be more than a little inefficient to have everyone test every knot, a bit like reinventing the wheel, again and again and again! ;)

I personally would not fully trust a "standardized" test, unless the test simulates my particular parameters.  Anyway, I test all knots I use according to the specific application. I trust my own tests the most.  I recommend people test their own knots for educational purposes.  If the application is something like rock climbing, then I'll be listening to somebody who has been climbing for decades and won't do much of my own experimentation.

There are many people posting tests on the Internet.  They give their testing parameters.  I consider the parameters as I consider using the knot in my own applications.

Example of a comprehensive test is Knot Wars' comprehensive testing of a whole bunch of fishing knots.  Search for it.  Reading about all their tests, and comparing knot geometries, has given me a sense of what features tend to make a strong fishing knot. They tell their parameters and even provide video.  It's up to you to determine if you're going to trust the test, but still there is no "standard."
« Last Edit: May 19, 2013, 04:30:54 PM by knot4u »