Author Topic: What is cutter?  (Read 1656 times)

vladimir3722

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 47
What is cutter?
« on: March 11, 2013, 06:11:37 PM »
Hello all!

I read ABOK#3293 & #3315 and didn't understand what cutter means: this relates to object made by cutter in a lathe or it means type of a boat.

Maybe cutter stay method of fastening stay in #3293 relates to type of a boat (cutter) and cutter-turned deadeye in #3315 relates to a lathe (deadeye had 2 grooves made in lathe)? ???

Please, help to understand it.

Regards.
Vladimir

Dan_Lehman

  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3942
Re: What is cutter?
« Reply #1 on: March 11, 2013, 07:44:59 PM »
1) I see that the Index for "cutter..." has one mistake
in citing (page) "436" vice "536".  (And the sorry state
of citing pages vs. entries!)

2) The helpful term seems to be "turn in" which is applied
to deadeyes, and thus I will guess that the "cutter..."
expression relates to that somehow --possibly for having
a circumferential groove for the stay or shroud to fit?


--dl*
====

James Petersen

  • Exp. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 183
Re: What is cutter?
« Reply #2 on: March 12, 2013, 04:46:16 PM »
Hello all!

I read ABOK#3293 & #3315 and didn't understand what cutter means: this relates to object made by cutter in a lathe or it means type of a boat.

Maybe cutter stay method of fastening stay in #3293 relates to type of a boat (cutter) and cutter-turned deadeye in #3315 relates to a lathe (deadeye had 2 grooves made in lathe)? ???

Please, help to understand it.

Regards.

I am no expert, but tying the straps or slings around a deadeye seems to have been referred to as "turning in the deadeye". I believe "cutter" is referring to a type of single-masted sailboat.

books.google.com/books?id=wQxqa5K_zcgC&pg=PA63&dq=turning+in+deadeyes&hl=en&sa=X&ei=hmY_UcjlHcWHrQfni4D4CQ&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q=turning in deadeyes&f=false

http://books.google.com/books?id=cjJFAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA100&vq=turning+in+deadeyes

http://www.hnsa.org/doc/luce/part11.htm (search for "cutter stay fashion" within the document)

I believe that the "cutter stay method"  and "cutter turned deadeyes" both refer to the fashion in which the deadeyes on the stays of cutters were turned in. It seems that "turning in" entailed tightening the lay of the rope encircling the deadeye to help keep water out, thereby extending the life of the rope.
« Last Edit: March 12, 2013, 07:18:43 PM by James Petersen »

vladimir3722

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 47
Re: What is cutter?
« Reply #3 on: March 20, 2013, 06:35:04 PM »
http://www.hnsa.org/doc/luce/part11.htm (search for "cutter stay fashion" within the document)

I believe that the "cutter stay method"  and "cutter turned deadeyes" both refer to the fashion in which the deadeyes on the stays of cutters were turned in.

Thank you, James, for explanation.

Very good picture is in Luce's book on p.607, it's better than in ABOK#3315 (Cow hitch is seen better how it's rove).
Vladimir