Author Topic: What does it mean?  (Read 3479 times)

vladimir3722

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 46
What does it mean?
« on: December 05, 2012, 09:47:51 PM »
Hello, everybody!

I live in Kazakhstan and interested in knot tying. I like book of knots by Ashley very much and read it often because there is no knot book in Russian like it. But my native language is russian and i don't know English well. So i don't understand some points in this great book.

For  example,  in knot #3119 i don't understand expression "that "will not jamb.""  Maybe it is mistake and "jam" must be. If jamb what does it mean? How can it be connected with "upper bar of a door frame" as i see in translation of this word in the dictionary?

Can anyone explain it?
Vladimir

roo

  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1796
    • The Notable Knot Index
Re: What does it mean?
« Reply #1 on: December 05, 2012, 10:57:31 PM »
Hello, everybody!

I live in Kazakhstan and interested in knot tying. I like book of knots by Ashley very much and read it often because there is no knot book in Russian like it. But my native language is russian and i don't know English well. So i don't understand some points in this great book.

For  example,  in knot #3119 i don't understand expression "that "will not jamb.""  Maybe it is mistake and "jam" must be. If jamb what does it mean? How can it be connected with "upper bar of a door frame" as i see in translation of this word in the dictionary?

Can anyone explain it?
He's quoting and older text.  At least in English, many older texts used non-standard spellings.   
If you wish to add a troll to your ignore list, click "Profile" then "Buddies/Ignore List".


Mrs Glenys Chew

  • Administrator
  • Exp. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 200
Re: What does it mean?
« Reply #2 on: December 05, 2012, 11:22:52 PM »
Hello Vladimir,


The word 'jamb' usually means the upright posts of a frame, such as a door.  However, as a verb, and with the spelling 'jam', the action means 'to be blocked or squeezed until or so that no movement is possible'.


No doubt you will have heard about the 200km 'traffic jam' on the M10 in Russia?  Or perhaps you have tried to force a padded parcel through a letterbox?  Those are both jams, or situations where a jam would occur.  Passing cordage around poles such as Ashley illustrates is another situation where a jam - an entanglement which prevents the smooth running or flow of the cord - may occur.


:) Glenys
Mrs Glenys Chew
1 Corinthians 15:10

vladimir3722

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 46
Re: What does it mean?
« Reply #3 on: December 06, 2012, 01:20:12 PM »
Thank you, Glenys. Good and simple explanation, especially illustrations.
Vladimir

Dan_Lehman

  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3773
Re: What does it mean?
« Reply #4 on: December 06, 2012, 05:37:47 PM »
The citation of the OP is, as Roo notes, itself a quoted term
by Ashley of some 1808 utterance --and that's the period
where one needs to seek its meaning.

Webster's 1922 ed. of 1909 Int. dictionary doesn't give
"jamb" as as verb.  But the 1888 edition has it with one
"nautical" meaning of "squeezing tightly".  The OED (older
ed.) also cites it, equating it to the 1st-given definition of
"jam".

Google has a function "NGram Viewer" which searches a database
of books for occurrences of phrases.  I got perhaps the most helpful
results with "can jamb, can jam", which showed some hits (I used
1800..1945 as my period).  Now, I wonder what the past tense
would be : 'jambed', 'jambbed' ?   ;)

FYI,
http://books.google.com/ngrams/


--dl*
====
« Last Edit: December 06, 2012, 06:06:46 PM by Dan_Lehman »

Mrs Glenys Chew

  • Administrator
  • Exp. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 200
Re: What does it mean?
« Reply #5 on: December 06, 2012, 06:40:05 PM »
Thank you, Dan, my Nuttalls 1908 doesn't have marine technical language in it.  I haven't tried using Google books for dictionary searches before.


:) Glenys
Mrs Glenys Chew
1 Corinthians 15:10

Dan_Lehman

  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3773
Re: What does it mean?
« Reply #6 on: December 06, 2012, 08:56:16 PM »
I haven't tried using Google books for dictionary searches before.

Nor I; I have those quoted big books (missing one of the
Webster's series, and still waiting now some decades past
historical frequency for the successor to the 3rd New Int.).
(The OED is a 2-phys.-vol. very-fine-print edition, though
on their decade-ago? update, one probably could nab some
library-discarded original multi-volume, normal-print set.)

 :)

Andy

  • Exp. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 134
  • Five Knots a Day keeps Alzheimer's Away
    • My Selection of Most Useful Knots
Re: What does it mean?
« Reply #7 on: December 06, 2012, 09:38:37 PM »
OED is always wonderful for examples of a word in use.
For those who are not familiar with it, to give you a taste, here's most of the entry for "jam" as a verb.


jam, v.1

(dʒ?m)

Also 8?9 jamb, dial. jaum.

[app. onomatop?ic, and akin to cham, champ.]

1.1 trans. To press or squeeze (an object) tightly between two converging bodies or surfaces; to wedge or fix immovably in an opening, either by forcing the object in, or by the narrowing or closing in of the sides.

   1719 De Foe Crusoe i. xiii, The Ship‥stuck fast, jaum'd in between two Rocks.    1753 Washington Jrnl. Writ. 1889 I. 38 We were jammed in the Ice, in such a Manner that we expected every Moment our Raft to sink, and ourselves to perish.    1769 Falconer Dict. Marine (1789) X iv b, A cask, box, &c. is‥said to be jammed, when it is‥wedged in between weighty bodies, so as not to be dislodged without‥difficulty.    1794 Rigging & Seamanship I. 153 The blocks are‥jambed up‥with wedges in a clave.    1818 Scott Hrt. Midl. ii, Wilson‥jammed himself so fast, that he was unable to draw his body back again.    c 1860 H. Stuart Seaman's Catech. 14 The rammer is jammed in the gun.

fig.    1865 Carlyle Fredk. Gt. xx. i, No end to his contrivances‥especially when you have him jammed into a corner.

b.1.b To make fast by tightening.

   1726 G. Roberts 4 Years Voy. 111 When the Shark had‥got his Head through the Noose, to hale, and thereby jam the running knot taut about him.    Ibid., I jamm'd the Snare by a sudden Jirk of the Rope, and haled him up.    1755 N. D. Falck Day's Diving Vessel 49 Run a jewel down, and jam all the sweeps amidships.

c.1.c To block or fill up (a passage or avenue) by crowding or crushing into it.

   1866 Mrs. Gaskell Wives & Dau. xv. (1867) 153 Heavy box after heavy box jammed up the passage.    1868 Tennyson Lucretius 169 As crowds that in an hour Of civic tumult jam the doors, and bear The keepers down.

d.1.d To bruise or crush by pressure.

   1832 Marryat N. Forster xiii, His hand was severely jammed by the heel of a topmast.    1840 Spurdens Suppl. Forby's Voc. E. Anglia (E.D.S.), Jam, to bruise by compression. ?He jamm'd his finger in the door.?    1880 Times 17 Dec. 5/6 The mate got his hand jammed, and received some other slight injuries.    1882 J. B. Baker Scarborough 502 Two men had each a leg jammed off.

e.1.e dial. (Eng. and U.S.) To press hard or make firm by treading, as land is trodden hard by cattle.

   1787 W. Marshall Norfolk (1795) II. Gloss. (E.D.S.), Jam, to render firm by treading; as cattle do land they are foddered on.    1890 in Cent. Dict. as U.S. dial.

2.2 intr. To become fixed, wedged, or held immovably; to stick fast.

   1706 S. Sewall Diary 6 Mar. (1879) II. 156 The Ice jam'd and made a great Damm.    1834 M. Scott Cruise Midge xix. (1859) 382 The sumpter-mule‥came down rattling past us like a whirlwind, until she jammed between the stems of two of the cocoa-nut trees.    1848 Thoreau Maine W. (1894) 33 Just above McCauslin's, there is a rocky rapid, where logs jam in the spring.    1860 Merc. Marine Mag. VII. 180 The cable jammed on the windlass.

3.3 trans. To cause the fixing or wedging of (some movable part of a machine) so that it cannot work; to render (a machine, gun, etc.) unworkable, by such wedging, sticking, or displacement.

   1851 Illustr. Catal. Gt. Exhib. 362 Immediately after the first shock‥the screw was jammed or locked.    1885 Pall Mall G. 24 Jan. 1/2 The term ?jammed?‥when used in connection with a machine gun means that the gun ceased to operate from some disarrangement of the parts.    1890 Times 6 Dec. 12/4 When the extractor grips a refractory cartridge the gun is jammed.    1891 Ld. Herschell in Law Times Rep. LXV. 593/1 Her propeller got foul of a rope, so that the shaft was jammed, and the engines could not be worked.

b.3.b intr. Of a machine, gun, etc.: To become unworkable through the wedging, sticking, or displacement of some movable part.

   1885 Manch. Exam. 25 Mar. 6/1 From five to twenty-five per cent of the rifles would jam after firing one or two rounds.    1889 Spectator 21 Sept., If the guns jam, the swords break, and the bayonets curl up, we cannot say that there is necessarily safety in the multitude of stores.    1892 Law Times Rep. LXVII. 251/2 [There can be no] doubt that this machinery did jam, and that it was the jamming which caused the collision.

c.3.c trans. To cause interference with (radio or radar signals) so as to render them unintelligible or useless, esp. deliberately; to prevent reception of (a transmitter or station) by such means. Also transf.

[examples removed]

4.4 trans. To press, squeeze, or crowd (a number of objects) together in a compact mass; to pack with force or vigour; to force together.

   1768 Wales in Phil. Trans. LX. 112 [The ice] consisted of large pieces close jambed together.    1871 L. Stephen Playgr. Europe v. (1894) 121 The masses‥were crumbled and jammed together so as to form a road.    1885 Manch. Exam. 14 Feb. 5/4 To jam them together in one or two rooms like sheep in a fold.    1886 R. C. Leslie Sea-painter's Log x. 195 In these pockets nearly all the soles of a catch are found jambed together.

5.5 To thrust, ram, or force violently into a confined space.

   1793 Smeaton Edystone L. ?53 A part of a chain‥was jammed in so fast‥that it remained so.    1841 L. Hunt Seer (1864) 84 He has a small foot‥and he would squeeze, jam, and damn it into a thimble.    1848 Dickens Dombey iv, Everything was jammed into the tightest cases.    1855 F. Chamier My Travels I. i. 12 All these‥useless articles were jammed into a bag.    1863 Geo. Eliot Romola vi, Ruined porticoes and columns‥jammed in confusedly among the dwellings of Christians.    1887 Sir R. H. Roberts In the Shires ii. 22 Hats are jammed tightly on the head.

fig.    1829 Scott Jrnl. 19 May, I have no turn for these committees, and yet I get always jamm'd into them.    1876 G. Meredith Beauch. Career III. xii. 214 He wants to jam the business of two or three centuries into a life-time.

b.5.b To thrust, push, dash, or drive (anything) violently or firmly against something, or in some direction, as down, in.

   1836 Boston Herald 12 Apr. 1/6 He jammed her against the bannisters.    1861 Hughes Tom Brown at Oxford ii. (1889) 12 [He] passed close under the bows‥the steersman having jammed his helm hard down.    1877 N.W. Linc. Gloss., Jaum, to strike another's head against any hard object, such as a wall.    1887 T. N. Page Ole Virginia (1893) 158 Polly jambed the door back, and returned to his side.

c.5.c To apply or put (a brake) on violently.

   1925 Morris Owner's Manual 11 Jambing on the brakes at the last moment.

6.6 intr. To play in a ?jam? or ?jam session? (see jam n.1 3); to extemporize. Also trans., to improvise (a tune, etc.). colloq. (orig. U.S.).

[examples removed]

Hence jammed (dʒ?md) ppl. a., squeezed, blocked up; ˈjammedness, jammed condition; ˈjamming vbl. n. and ppl. a.
   (In first quot. the form and meaning are uncertain.)

   [1617 J. Taylor (Water P.) London to Hamburgh C iv, The chaine was shorter then the halter, by reason whereof hee was not strangled, but by the gamming of the chaine which could not slip close to his necke he hanged in great torments.]    1769 Falconer Dict. Marine (1789), Jamming, the act of inclosing any object between two bodies, so as to render it immoveable.    1887 W. Crane in Pall Mall G. 16 Nov. 2/2 The mounted men charging into this jammed crowd every now and then.    1887 A. A. Wright in Boston Acad. June 5 Browning's conciseness is more than conciseness; it is jammedness.

my selection of most useful knots

Mrs Glenys Chew

  • Administrator
  • Exp. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 200
Re: What does it mean?
« Reply #8 on: December 06, 2012, 09:53:10 PM »
Thank you, Andy, those are great examples.


Dan: I once saw a Complete OED (Vladimir: did we explain that that means Oxford English Dictionary?) in a secondhand bookshop.  It was about A3 size, in 2 volumes, each very thick, and with print so small the box it was supplied in had a secret compartment with a magnifying glass in it.


:) Glenys
Mrs Glenys Chew
1 Corinthians 15:10

vladimir3722

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 46
Re: What does it mean?
« Reply #9 on: December 06, 2012, 10:20:32 PM »
Very good investigation, Andy. I want such a dictionary too. Where can i take this wonderful dictionary?

Vladimir

vladimir3722

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 46
Re: What does it mean?
« Reply #10 on: December 06, 2012, 10:20:54 PM »
Yes, Glenys, i searched in Google and it gave me official site of Oxford English Dictionary.
Vladimir

Andy

  • Exp. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 134
  • Five Knots a Day keeps Alzheimer's Away
    • My Selection of Most Useful Knots
Re: What does it mean?
« Reply #11 on: December 06, 2012, 10:28:25 PM »
Hi Vladimir

Quote
I want such a dictionary too. Where can i take this wonderful dictionary?

I have electronic access through my public library. You might have a library near you that subscribes to OED and can give you that kind of access.
I believe there is also a stand-alone software version, but it won't be cheap.

EDIT: here's subscription information.
« Last Edit: December 06, 2012, 10:30:57 PM by Andy »
my selection of most useful knots