Author Topic: Mike s bowline(s) and the Janus C bowline.  (Read 3266 times)

X1

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Mike s bowline(s) and the Janus C bowline.
« on: October 24, 2012, 02:04:21 PM »
  When we see a bend where the two links are topologically equivalent to the unknot ( i.e., they are not overhand knots, figure 8 knots or more convoluted knots ), the first thing that crosses our mind is to examine if this bend can serve as a basis for a bowline-like end-of-line loop - because the one link of the bend can be transformed into a more or less simple nipping loop of such a loop, and the other into a more or less simple collared structure, attached on the standing part with the help of this nipping loop.
   So it is only natural to examine in such a manner the nice Mike s bend, posted at (1). ( See the attached pictures). Due to the form of this bend, the two ends emerging from the same side are following a different path at their last part - so it makes a difference if we chose the one or the other as the standing end of a bowline-like loop derived from it. Hence we have two possible Mike s bowlines, the A and the B. Let us denote as Mike s bowline (A) the end-of-line loop derived from the Mike s bend shown at the attached pictures, where the two ends at the left side are connected, and form the eye of the loop - they are transformed into the eye leg of the standing part and the eye leg of the bight of this bowline-like loop.
    Although the two links of the parent Mike s bend are not overhand knots or figure 8 knots, their path is quite convoluted - so I thought that, to secure the tail of the derived bowline-like loop, we will need only a part of the one link to play the role of the collared structure, not the whole segment that was used at the parent bend. So I untucked the tail of the Mike s bowline (A) once, and I dressed the remaining knot as a bowline - as an end-of line loop where the form is greatly determined by the 100% loading of the standing end.
   Surprize !  :) What emerged was a Janus secure bowline - actually the Janus C bowline that I have examined some time ago ( see the attached pictures).
   Neither the Mike s bend nor any of the many knots of the Janus family of bowlines are "new", but I thought that their relationship is probably unnoticed/unknown, and I decided to present it here.

1. http://igkt.net/sm/index.php?topic=3585.msg20510#new
« Last Edit: October 24, 2012, 02:26:43 PM by X1 »

Mike in MD

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Re: Mike s bowline(s) and the Janus C bowline.
« Reply #1 on: October 25, 2012, 03:44:45 PM »
Hi X1,    (?)

To add some historical perspective, I learned this bend from a picture of what I thought was a bend.  I taught myself how to tie it as a bend.  Later, I found out that the picture was a close-up of a jug sling.  (without the jug)

So the process is:  jug sling -> bend -> janus bowline

I still use the bend as a decorative bend, but my choice for a working bend is shake-hands.

Mike

X1

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Re: Mike s bowline(s) and the Janus C bowline.
« Reply #2 on: October 25, 2012, 06:03:40 PM »
   Thank you Mike,

   As I have mentioned in the thread where you first presented this bend, it may be considered as a form of the Axis knot, However, it is quite different from it, and the fact that Roger E. Miles did not find it, tells much of how new and unexpected was this sling-turned-into-a-bend transformation !   :)
   It is a very peculiar bend, where the first curves of the standing parts are among the wider - if not the widest - of all the bends I know ( and I know a lot...). That means that it should be a very strong bend - iff in the tightened phase it can retain the form it has when it is set in the first place, However, it is somehow unstable in the initial phase of the loading, and this can distort its nice form - and reduce the radii of the first curves at the hardly tightened knot. I have not tested the complete end-of-line bowline-like loop(s) made by it yet. I hope I will do it soon. However, in an end-of-line loop knot the loadings are not symmetrical - the standing part of the loop bears 100% of the weight, while the other ex-standing part of the bend and now eye leg of the standing part or eye leg of the bight bears only 50% of the load. This can also distort the form of the ex-bend, and reduce the radii of the first curves. I am afraid that the Mike s bowline(s) will suffer from this quite a bid.
« Last Edit: October 25, 2012, 06:06:22 PM by X1 »