Author Topic: Girth-hitched "Eskimo" bowlines  (Read 13627 times)

X1

  • Inactive
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1200
Re: Girth-hitched "Eskimo" bowlines
« Reply #15 on: May 07, 2013, 05:18:23 PM »
I hope this is the same knot:
a girth hitch, plus a tucking, form a big hole, then push a bight into that hole, done.

  You describe it as it it was easier than it really is... :) Tucking through which of the many possible "holes" of the Girth hitch ? After this tucking, the working end goes "over" the two eye legs - it could well go "under" them. And the last bight, that penetrates the main coil "tube", penetrates the (red, highlighted) bight formed by the returning eye leg, too - it could well go "over" or "under" it.
  It is almost the same knot - the minor difference would probably make almost no difference, and would probably be noticed by almost nobody  :).  I had a concrete reason I tied the knot as shown in the original presentation, and not in your variation ( which I had also considered ). Just follow the standing part : You will see that its first curve, which is the most important squeezing/securing segment of any eyeknot (because it carries the 100% of the load ), in your variation comes in direct contact mainly with the last segment of the tail, which is free-floating ( In fact, the only reasons this loosely connected last part of the tail ( the tail of the tail... :) ) goes through the coil "tube", is to enhance the stiffness of this pseudo-Zeppelin s loop "pivot", and to widen the diameter of the standing part s first curve ). In my variation, the first curve comes in contact mainly with the functional ( regarding slippage ) part of the tail, the segment before this last tail-of-the-tail one. It makes no sense to "waste" some of the nipping power of the standing part s first curve just to secure even more a segment that is not tightly connected to the rest of the line... So, in my variation, I twisted the "pivot" bight as I had, in order to concentrate the nipping power of the first curve on the functional ( regarding slippage ) part of the tail, not on the tail of the tail.
« Last Edit: May 07, 2013, 05:26:41 PM by X1 »

Ruby

  • Exp. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 173
Re: Girth-hitched "Eskimo" bowlines
« Reply #16 on: May 08, 2013, 01:03:40 AM »
Well, it's just a brief description, not detailed instruction. Better than none.  :D

When tying it there's always a finger in the hole, so I don't think the direction if a big problem.

Tucking through which of the many possible "holes" of the Girth hitch ?
to get your knot's beauty , there's only one way. It's obvious ,No need thinking .
It'd become ugly if going wrong way, easy to check.

On the other hand , this shape 8 overhand Does go into the unusual direction , so hard to remember , I can't tie the so called shape 8 overhand without looking at your picture from time to time.





You mean the last bight should be paralleled, no crossing? Actually I tied it the same way, just that picture is copied and edited by your picture and I didn't edit that tail part.
« Last Edit: May 08, 2013, 01:43:12 AM by Ruby »

X1

  • Inactive
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1200
Re: Girth-hitched "Eskimo" bowlines
« Reply #17 on: May 08, 2013, 09:57:47 AM »
When tying it there's always a finger in the hole, so I don't think the direction if a big problem.

  See ? We can not even imagine how different people tie the same knots !  :) I NEVER put a finger into the two "holes" of ANY Girth / Cow hitch !  :) I keep the two bights in between the thumb and index finger, from outside.

to get your knot's beauty , there's only one way. It's obvious. No need for thinking.
It'd become ugly if going wrong way, easy to check.

   Thank you ! However, unfortunately, we can not say that the pursuit of beauty by itself can serve as part of the tying instruction set...
   Regarding beauty, most people, knot tyers included, turn a blind eye !

You mean the last bight should be paralleled, no crossing?

   No, I mean that it makes a difference if, from the two parallel eye legs of this bight ( see the blue lines at the attached picture), the "up"/"near-the-standing-end-of-the-eyeknot" is the "tail-of-the-tail" and the "down"/"near-the-bight-of-the-eyeknot" is the segment of the tail before that (as it happens in my variation), or vice versa ( as it happens in yours ).

 
« Last Edit: May 08, 2013, 12:14:25 PM by X1 »

Ruby

  • Exp. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 173
Re: Girth-hitched "Eskimo" bowlines
« Reply #18 on: May 08, 2013, 11:44:55 AM »
Got it.

 As said, I tied it as the blue line,

just didn't edit that part  in the picture


And, you're right that  I didn't realize the difference