Author Topic: Siberian Hitch  (Read 11452 times)

TMCD

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Siberian Hitch
« on: July 01, 2012, 01:01:39 PM »
I've known about this knot for quite some time and finally took the time to learn it. What a simple, effective and cool knot, especially for camping. I'm sure it's been discussed on these boards before now but it's a campers delight. I'll start using this for the anchor end of my ridge line and clothesline when camping. I always tie off the other end using a trucker's hitch.

Speaking of camping, they normally recommend that you tie off the guy line using the taut line hitch. The TH would actually work here too and obviously create more tension. What do you other campers on this board use for your guy lines? Doesn't the TH make more sense? Love the Siberian Hitch...what other uses do you guys use it for?

roo

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Re: Siberian Hitch
« Reply #1 on: July 01, 2012, 05:06:56 PM »
Love the Siberian Hitch...what other uses do you guys use it for?
It can be used as a release-from-a-distance hitch when you don't have access to any rope ends or hitching object ends, as shown in the final diagram here (shown using the watered-down and related Halter Hitch):

http://notableknotindex.webs.com/haltersiberian.html

But on the isolated occasions where I use it, the application is typically non-critical, I'll tend to settle for the reduced-complexity Halter Hitch.

I tend to use the Tumbling Timber Hitch more for release-from-a-distance applications, overall.
« Last Edit: July 01, 2012, 05:15:54 PM by roo »
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knot4u

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Re: Siberian Hitch
« Reply #2 on: July 01, 2012, 08:41:03 PM »
Yes, the Siberian is a suitable anchor knot for many applications. Youtube has some videos of using it as an anchor in camping applications.

Where a Siberian can be used, however, I find myself using a Slipped Buntline, a Timber, Sailor, Girth, or some sort of fixed loop. I'm not totally comfortable with how the Siberian opens up on large diameter objects. It remains secure in that form, but I figure there's no reason for me to deal with my discomfort when there are other hitches that will remain true to form.

Regarding the Trucker Hitch, I agree it is a fantastic substitute for a Tautline, a Blake, an Adjustable Grip, etc. I strongly prefer a Trucker Hitch because it's easier to adjust the tension, easier to release, more secure, and easier to get more tension. Minor disadvantages of a Trucker are that it requires a bit more rope, more forethought, and more practice to tie it correctly and quickly.
« Last Edit: July 02, 2012, 05:10:47 AM by knot4u »

roo

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Re: Siberian Hitch
« Reply #3 on: July 02, 2012, 06:39:21 AM »
Speaking of camping, they normally recommend that you tie off the guy line using the taut line hitch. The TH would actually work here too and obviously create more tension. What do you other campers on this board use for your guy lines? Doesn't the TH make more sense?
While it is possible to use some variant of a trucker's-type hitch, they have a drawback.  Namely, they lack the ability to incrementally take up tension or slack as you adjust other parts of the of the tensioned object in question.

Of the mechanisms that do have incremental adjustment ability, the choice depends on the severity and variability of the loads, as well as how forgiving the rope is.

The most robust (& powerful) incremental tensioner:
http://notableknotindex.webs.com/Versatackle.html

Mid-range:
http://notableknotindex.webs.com/blakeshitch.html
http://notableknotindex.webs.com/guyline.html

Low-end:
http://notableknotindex.webs.com/tautline.html

If you use these with ground stakes, it is entirely possible to leave them permanently in the line so that you don't have to keep re-tying them.
« Last Edit: July 02, 2012, 06:43:20 AM by roo »
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knot4u

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Re: Siberian Hitch
« Reply #4 on: July 02, 2012, 09:08:10 PM »
Browsing the Internet, I randomly came across the Farrimond Friction Htich:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Farrimond_friction_hitch

Does anybody here use this?

Sweeney

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Re: Siberian Hitch
« Reply #5 on: July 02, 2012, 09:22:18 PM »
Never heard of it until now but the actor credited with its discovery is in a (daily) radio soap opera in the UK which has been running for donkey's years - 62 to be precise - "an everyday story of country folk" called "The Archers" (characters' surname not toxophily). I'll certainly give the hitch a try.

Barry

knot4u

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Re: Siberian Hitch
« Reply #6 on: July 02, 2012, 09:31:20 PM »
Here's a video for the Farrimond.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oH57nkG9DZk
« Last Edit: July 03, 2012, 09:15:51 PM by knot4u »

roo

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Re: Siberian Hitch
« Reply #7 on: July 02, 2012, 10:23:33 PM »
Browsing the Internet, I randomly came across the Farrimond Friction Htich:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Farrimond_friction_hitch

Does anybody here use this?
I remember seeing this before and passing on it, but don't recall why.

Upon revisiting it, it seems a little difficult to actually execute, and half of the coils (those near the object) seem to be wasted or underutilized.  Most slip and grip hitches aren't difficult to untie, so the draw loop seems a bit unnecessary beyond giving a larger object for the prusik-like feature to hold (which it probably does need to better prevent capsizing).  Most similar-class options are far more efficient with line usage.

Upon loading up this hitch just now, the wasted coil issue comes up, as beyond light-to-moderate strain, the hitch slides toward the object.  I'd expect more for all those coils.
« Last Edit: July 02, 2012, 10:42:36 PM by roo »
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TMCD

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Re: Siberian Hitch
« Reply #8 on: July 03, 2012, 01:44:05 AM »
I've been experimenting with the Highwayman's Hitch, Siberian Hitch and the Tumble Hitch, quick release knots. The Tumble Hitch seems difficult to learn...it doesn't tighten very easily IMO, maybe I'm doing something wrong. The Highwayman's Hitch clearly has that capsizing flaw if to much strain is put on it and I guess the Tumble Hitch remedies this.

I really like the Siberian Hitch though and can take it into the wild and use it in my camping endeavors.

roo

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Re: Siberian Hitch
« Reply #9 on: July 03, 2012, 03:48:07 AM »
I've been experimenting with the Highwayman's Hitch, Siberian Hitch and the Tumble Hitch, quick release knots.
Does the Slipped Buntline Hitch or a Tumbling Timber Hitch fit into the mix?
« Last Edit: July 03, 2012, 03:50:45 AM by roo »
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knot4u

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Re: Siberian Hitch
« Reply #10 on: July 03, 2012, 06:23:25 PM »
I've been experimenting with the Highwayman's Hitch, Siberian Hitch and the Tumble Hitch, quick release knots.

I put the Highwayman and the Tumble in a special category of "exploding" hitches. They are beyond merely quick release. As you know, an exploding hitch is a hitch that causes the rope to be completely removed from the object when the slip is pulled out.

In contrast, the Siberian is not an exploding hitch, but it is quick release. I put the Siberian in the same category as the Slipped Buntline, the Halter, the Highpoint, etc. I prefer this type of hitch where the exploding feature is unnecessary.

If I don't need the exploding feature, then there is no need to tie an exploding hitch. They are more complex, are more difficult to set right, and make me nervous. I personally have never truly needed the exploding feature, but it's in my arsenal just in case.
« Last Edit: July 03, 2012, 08:15:50 PM by knot4u »

TMCD

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Re: Siberian Hitch
« Reply #11 on: July 03, 2012, 08:35:07 PM »
I agree Knot4u, the exploding hitch really isn't paramount to anything I do. I guess it's important for horse people and farmers, I'm a house painter so don't need it. The slipped buntline is probably the best slipped knot going, at least IMO. That darn tumble hitch is a pain to tie and tighten IMO. I think it's REALLY cool the way they explode into nothing though.

knot4u

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Re: Siberian Hitch
« Reply #12 on: July 03, 2012, 09:32:07 PM »
Here is a slightly more stable version of the Highwayman. I call it the Getaway Hitch. Look closely. It's not the same as the more popular Highwayman. I don't have step-by-step pics for tying this, but have some fun and play with it. You'll figure it out.



I would never use an exploding hitch for a critical application. So, I'm not obsessed with finding an exploding hitch that's highly stable. Unfortunately, the more stable exploding hitches (e.g., Tumble and Tumble Timber) are also more complex. I figure an exploding hitch is something to tie super quickly and untie super quickly. The Tumble and Tumble Timber may be too fiddly or complex to tie super quickly. Of course, you may be able to get there with practice and motivation.
« Last Edit: July 03, 2012, 09:51:41 PM by knot4u »

roo

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Re: Siberian Hitch
« Reply #13 on: July 03, 2012, 10:30:24 PM »
Here is a slightly more stable version of the Highwayman. I call it the Getaway Hitch. Look closely. It's not the same as the more popular Highwayman. I don't have step-by-step pics for tying this, but have some fun and play with it. You'll figure it out.

I would never use an exploding hitch for a critical application. So, I'm not obsessed with finding an exploding hitch that's highly stable.
A Halter Hitch can be made with similar function and with similar complexity, and is fairly stable.  See last diagram here.  It and the Tumbling Timber Hitch are about the same ease of execution for me.
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TMCD

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Re: Siberian Hitch
« Reply #14 on: July 04, 2012, 12:12:22 AM »
Knot4U,
You've got a dandy little explosion hitch right there. It's a little fidgety but it tightens better than the tumble hitch IMO and holds very well. Great invention Knot4U and I'll try to find uses for that gentleman.