Author Topic: A Mid-line (directional) Eyeknot like Ashley's #1408  (Read 9937 times)

Dan_Lehman

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Re: A Mid-line (directional) Eyeknot like Ashley's #1408
« Reply #15 on: August 11, 2015, 07:02:23 PM »
The knot I tied is simply made by starting with the second image here:
http://notableknotindex.webs.com/spanloop.html

but instead of flipping the bottom loop back and up and tucking it forward,
exactly as shown by the arrow, instead flip it forward and up and tuck it back.

The geometry the tangle takes as a loop is very different though ... .

//
This imposter makes a nice [end-2-end knot] for different sized ropes.

I'm puzzled.  Doing what you describe (w/handy reference to an image)
yields an eye knot in which the S.Part makes a helical bend without
U-turn --a sort of knot that X. & I have considered here (as I and
perhaps also X. were seeking gradual-deflection-of-S.Part as it
enters the knot).  I don't see how this can stand up to being
an end-2-end knot, where this helical segment is loaded only
from the S.Part end!?

As to using the span loop, I might ask why not just go
ahead with that 2nd (middle)-image stage and make a
bowline with a bight --to either just give an quickly
tied & untied directional eye knot, or one with twin eyes
(for resisting material wear/abrasion)?!  --which is not to
fault the span in any way, but to question not going
to an also if not more quickly formed common know,
with possible gain (re wear)?!


--dl*
====

Tex

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Re: A Mid-line (directional) Eyeknot like Ashley's #1408
« Reply #16 on: August 12, 2015, 12:19:46 AM »
I wasn't exactly advocating for it in a general sense.  Someone mentioned the knot, and it was in my mind when I needed a knot, so I tied it, or as it turned out, by accident this other thing.  It happened that I tied it with very different size and stiffness ropes too. 

Anyway, yes, that's right, the one simple side merely makes a 270 helix.  IN a stiff thick rope this helix gets laid into a 3/4 turn like a blackwall hitch (which is more complex than the simple side of a sheet bend*)with crossing point which is grabbed by something like a transom hitch(even if slightly incomplete/propped-up) formed of the thin soft rope (this can fold into something a bit different looking under load, and for that matter ends up gaining a u-turn).  In identical ropes, (other than very stiff ones maybe? or possibly if dressed carefully -- How well does a sheet bend work if you dress the u-shaped rope as a straight line?), it works pretty poorly I'd think.  So no, it doesn't stand up as an in-line loop.  Since for bends you usually get access to at least one end, there are probably better bends one could tie too, but this seems to beat a simple sheet bend, certainly for slack security. (Recently I needed to tie a "midline bend" between a thick and thin rope, with access only to the end of the thick rope and while maintaining some light directional tension on the thin rope. Turns one's tying methods on end a little.)

 I only thought it should also be a good loop when I thought it was a span loop.  I didn't tie this during some knotting meditation, I tied it during real(non-critical obviously) use and just noticed what I had a chance to notice at the time, which still seems true other than the noted correction.

If you really care much, you have to try it. The horizontal overhand loop in the second picture is made with the thin rope, with its tail hanging down as the outgoing leg of the downward hangning loop.  The upward going bight is made with the thick rope, and the two tails then get tucked up.  Giver or take 180 degree twist of the tails, there are three dressings.  I don't promise you'll be amazed, but it worked for me.
« Last Edit: August 12, 2015, 02:04:58 AM by Tex »

Knutern

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Give this a try (video): A Mid-line (directional) Eyeknot like Ashley's #1408
« Reply #17 on: December 02, 2015, 01:01:55 AM »
Hi.

I've tried to tie this loop the way I think it's supposed to be tied (TIB).
Is it wrong?
https://youtu.be/rwZYLuNMDMo
I'm aiming for knots that is secure, AND that is easy to untie.

Sweeney

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Hi.

I've tried to tie this loop the way I think it's supposed to be tied (TIB).
Is it wrong?
https://youtu.be/rwZYLuNMDMo

The knot tyer in the video seems unsure of what they are doing - the result is a clumsy tangle to me.

Sweeney

Knutern

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Re: A Mid-line (directional) Eyeknot like Ashley's #1408
« Reply #19 on: December 03, 2015, 01:10:26 AM »
Didn't you forgot to mention "in your face" too? Yea, stiff rope combined with I have to hold both hands around the pole that holds the webcam may have that effect on the tying process.
I did only take one shot (and the beginning should have being cutted), so the tying became ugly - I admit that honestly.

Since the tying process and dressing seems to be the only factors that is being reffered to, I assume that the topology of the badly dressed loop is similar to those nice pictures earlier posted.
I'm aiming for knots that is secure, AND that is easy to untie.

Sweeney

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The knot tyer in the video seems unsure of what they are doing - the result is a clumsy tangle to me.
Sweeney

Sorry Knutern that was a bit harsh - I looked at the video on my phone and to be honest I am not sure if this is the same. The resulting loop seems unstable - it starts to slip in the video until tightened so I am afraid I lost interest in the knot because it doesn't seem to offer any advantage over others such as the span loop.

Sweeney

Birchhatchet

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Re: A Mid-line (directional) Eyeknot like Ashley's #1408
« Reply #21 on: December 04, 2015, 02:19:52 PM »
For me it was a kind of puzzle to tie this knot according to the written instructions. So I tied it following Dan's freehand sketch. For those of you that also failed to tie this nice knot up to now, I made a few pics to show clearly one possibility to tie the knot. It is probably not the smartest way but it is well reproducible.

Stage 1: Arrange a simple noose as shown. If your result looks somewhat different, try to make the wrap of the simple noose in the opposite direction.

Stage 2: Bring the left lower part to the right as on the photo. Note that the result has a lower bight and an upper opening.

Stage 3: Tuck the lower bight through the upper opening and you're done.

I don't know actually where I could use this TIB loop but at least it is a neat supplement to my knotting repertoire.

By the way, I really like the look of your sketch Dan. Seems as if you're working on your own DBoK  8)

Birchhatchet