Author Topic: Securing rope to horizontal bar  (Read 16986 times)

KC

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Re: Securing rope to horizontal bar
« Reply #30 on: May 14, 2006, 02:40:17 AM »
i think instability of single leg support connection per side exercises you strength and balanced control wise more.   A small sling might be about the same, but certainly a larger or in any other way spread sling would be stabler/ less exercise.

Other factors to stability notion are how far away from supports hand grips are and if tensioned lines were straight up and down, compressing in or  pulling out on handholds.
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Bill

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Re: Securing rope to horizontal bar
« Reply #31 on: May 15, 2006, 05:24:14 PM »
Quote

I don't follow what you're saying, here?  What is this "instability" that
you WANT, and why does it come from a single rope but not a  sling?
(It would be possible to tie a loopknot in the the end of the  sling.)


--dl*
====

A single line is less stable requiring more coordination/strength to pull oneself up from than 2 or more lines.

Bill

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Re: Securing rope to horizontal bar
« Reply #32 on: May 15, 2006, 05:26:12 PM »
With the Timber Hitch I've tied, the Standing End is used to hold the load (my bodyweight). Could I also use Working End in the same way? So when I'm not using the Standing End, would the Working End be as steadfast?

Otherwise, please recommend a hitch for this purpose.

Bill

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Re: Securing rope to horizontal bar
« Reply #33 on: May 15, 2006, 05:50:44 PM »
Also, I intend for one of the Ends to be a little longer than the other. So the Working End might be longer than the Standing End or vice-versa.

KC

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Re: Securing rope to horizontal bar
« Reply #34 on: May 15, 2006, 07:10:01 PM »
i'd at least consider buffering loading to the bitters of Timber with turn etc.; make sure it is dressed right to firmly clamp down on Bitters ~180 degrees from pull of bodyweight on convex location.

i still think there ae considerations of rope angle, bend in standing tension part, and tightenss of bight around host at each end; especially in weaker lines.

Pix etc. at Wiki
« Last Edit: May 15, 2006, 07:12:36 PM by KC »
Rope-n-Saw Life
"Nature, to be commanded, must be obeyed" -Sir Francis Bacon
We now return you to the safety of normal thinking peoples.
~ Please excuse the interruption; thanx -the mgmt.~