Author Topic: Securing rope to horizontal bar  (Read 16980 times)

roo

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Re: Securing rope to horizontal bar
« Reply #15 on: May 11, 2006, 07:38:53 PM »
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And, for cotton, that'd be much thicker, and so much kinder to the hands.

--dl*
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I was envisioning him using a separate handle or ring to hold onto.  Also, it's kinda hard finding large diameter cotton rope.
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Jimbo

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Re: Securing rope to horizontal bar
« Reply #16 on: May 11, 2006, 09:11:19 PM »
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kinda hard finding large diameter cotton rope.


Ummm...

Horse trainers, pet toy manufacturers, exercise & gymnastic equipment vendors, all should know where to find large cotton rope.  What did you mean by "large"?  1" (25.4mm) is not too hard to find online.  Y'all did notice, didn't you, that the load limits for cotton rope can be hard to find.  There's a good reason for that.  Get more pads.  Or a net.

(Jimbo's motto: Large cotton rope is comfortable.  A large halo brace is not.  Large HT chain is not unacceptable as an alternative to both.)

PS: Another source for big, comfortable scraps (tho probably not cotton) is local military (especially training) facilities.  They tend to use rope hard & replace it early.  Ask for PT supplies, as their climbing ropes tend to be quite substantial...  Also "fast-rope" helicopter assaults use some thick cordage...  Obviously you'd want to ask any riggers you see...  Just a thought...
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roo

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Re: Securing rope to horizontal bar
« Reply #17 on: May 11, 2006, 09:54:03 PM »
Quote


Ummm...

Horse trainers, pet toy manufacturers, exercise & gymnastic equipment vendors, all should know where to find large cotton rope.  What did you mean by "large"?  1" (25.4mm) is not too hard to find online.  Y'all did notice, didn't you, that the load limits for cotton rope can be hard to find.  There's a good reason for that.  Get more pads.  Or a net.



I'm guessing, per our quick calculations, that cotton rope larger than 1" would be required.  Can you readily find cotton rope with a minimum breaking load of 4000 lb?
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Bill

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Re: Securing rope to horizontal bar
« Reply #18 on: May 12, 2006, 04:35:52 AM »
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Bill,

No one in his right mind would venture a guess as to the material of which your rope is constructed, just by a picture on a WWWeb page!!  As SquareRigger implied, any "advice" given is subject to litigious retribution.  Nevermind the ruling classes, to paraphrase SquareRigger: it would hurt my heart if I found my advice caused you pain!!!

But, in the spirit of traditional Individual Responsibility, I hope you may find this useful:

Fibres Guide - How to Identify the Synthetic Fibres Used In Rope Making

As to the problem at hand, if you put in eyes at either end of a rope of the "right" length, why not just drape the rope (with half-knots if you're not "smooooth", to keep it from slip-sliding away) across the "handles" (what look like handles in the wee pic anyway)?

Also, as I sometimes throw cordage over the roof beams for a fun workout (and Rings are my favorite workout "toy" -- though I'm too poor for the "real thing", so I just use eyes & fixed loops), could you hold forth on the details of your "rig" some more??  I'd like to know if you're using the thimbles as depicted in your Eye-Splice pic, and do you consider the Eyes as your "rings" or do you fasten traditional rings to these eyes?  Also, if you're hanging off the workout toy in the picture, where do your feet (or head) go when you get vertical??  You've given me some interesting ideas, which I appreciate very much.  Thank you!


I hope this helps!  And happy sweating!!!


Jimbo

I'm brand new to knot tying and all these terms, concepts are less than a week old to me, so my ideas and questions might seem brash.

Thanks for the idea of using a thimble in the eye-splice. I'm stuggling with your idea of half-knots and "smooooth" and am in the middle of googling with it in mind.

I placed some rubber foam padding around the rope of each eye-splice to grip but it's still overly supple and still requires gloves to be worn. I couldn't find anything that resembles traditional Rings or what seems strong enough to use for handles. Now, I'd like to experiment with a thimble and am wondering what kind of material to use....

As you can imagine, my rig is very humble. I pull myself up from a squatting position so I start low to the ground and have the safety of my feet if I need to land in case the rope breaks. It works well, so far so good.

squarerigger

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Re: Securing rope to horizontal bar
« Reply #19 on: May 12, 2006, 06:00:55 AM »
Hi Bill,

Just to chip in one more time - are you sure your photo is the right way round?  Your line is left laid, according to the photo (look at the twist in your line, it twists from lower right to upper left) and that doesn't happen too often!  The photo is fuzzy but the fibers at the end appear to be stiff as opposed to soft and feathery, like what I've seen for cotton.  Where did you get the line?

SquareRigger

Bill

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Re: Securing rope to horizontal bar
« Reply #20 on: May 12, 2006, 09:01:43 AM »
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Hi Bill,

Just to chip in one more time - are you sure your photo is the right way round?  Your line is left laid, according to the photo (look at the twist in your line, it twists from lower right to upper left) and that doesn't happen too often!  The photo is fuzzy but the fibers at the end appear to be stiff as opposed to soft and feathery, like what I've seen for cotton.  Where did you get the line?

SquareRigger

You're right SquareRigger! The thread of my rope runs in the opposite direction to that of all the pictures of ropes I've seen on the internet! Funny that.

I'm not sure if I'd call it totally stiff but it does have a quality that's in between what you're suggesting.

A friend gave me the rope and lots of it. I'm referring to the photo I took of my rope here:
http://putfile.com/pic.php?pic=5/12920143370.jpg&s=f5

What are the implications of left laid rope?

squarerigger

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Re: Securing rope to horizontal bar
« Reply #21 on: May 12, 2006, 09:12:35 AM »
Hi Bill,

No biggie as far as strength or useability goes - it is just different, and I would suspect that might even make it hemp instead of cotton.  Hemp is more frequently laid left-hand twist (more frequent than manila or cotton, IMHO) and feels softer than manila and sisal but harder than cotton - it is very hard to tell (and I ain't no dunny Jimbo!) from this photo, because it is so out of focus.  The twist may change what you do as far as the way you tie some knots....

SquareRigger

Bill

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Re: Securing rope to horizontal bar
« Reply #22 on: May 12, 2006, 09:31:04 AM »
I've been trying to take more photos of it, but it always appears out of focus :(

Bill

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Re: Securing rope to horizontal bar
« Reply #23 on: May 12, 2006, 09:36:45 AM »

Bill

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Re: Securing rope to horizontal bar
« Reply #24 on: May 12, 2006, 09:38:03 AM »
The dirty bit of the rope at the top left corner actually appears the most in focus.

KC

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Re: Securing rope to horizontal bar
« Reply #25 on: May 12, 2006, 09:30:42 PM »
Cotton is softer.  Naturals don't melt, but rather char with lighter/ butane backsplice.  Some high end Kevlar/ Technora chars, but lots hotter.  Naturals can double in weight with water.

i'd think soft, white natural; would be cotton.
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Dan_Lehman

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Re: Securing rope to horizontal bar
« Reply #26 on: May 13, 2006, 08:21:16 AM »
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What are the implications of left laid rope?

Can only be used safely in the southern hemisphere.
--will quickly ravel in the northern one, if ends aren't strongly whipped!

Well, maybe not, but that advice seems fitting with this thread, which has grown
pretty strange:  the OP is looking for rope to tie to a bar to support his body weight,
and which "bar" turns out to be some kind of rather small-looking device seemingly
already built to facilitate the chin-ups & dips intended for the rope, but then comes
mention of more gymnastic type maneuvres (!)--on THAT device?, and some
"for example" calculation become specification for two ton rope strength!!
Holy smokes, how heavy is this dippy guy supposed to be??  --maybe there's   some
need for exercise, but not THAT much need.

I find 1/2" cotton rope given a 156# working load, and for some of the activity
suggested, that seems adequate; 3/4" is 3,100#, from same vendor.
(Jimbo, the vendor you linked to has some dubious information:
  PP rope  "excellent" vs. UV degradation(?!!),
  nylon "poor" re rot (?),  and good resistance to acids(!?),
  AND a rope selection guide that omits several of the marketed ropes!)

Rather than the splicing of eyes, one could just tie off two ends of a bight of
rope (call it one BIG eye) to the bar; or bend them together (Twin Bowlines,
leaving about, oh, a foot of doubled lines between the knots, for hands!?) and
tie off the two slings with a girth or Prusik hitch to the bar.  You did say you have
LOTS of rope, so doubling it in this way helps put more of it to use.

--dl*
====

Bill

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Re: Securing rope to horizontal bar
« Reply #27 on: May 13, 2006, 09:14:41 AM »
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Holy smokes, how heavy is this dippy guy supposed to be??  --maybe there's   some
need for exercise, but not THAT much need.

Oh so you're a Doc and a strength coach now? Well, thanks for the advice, tubby, but I can't always make it to the gym. ;)
Quote

Rather than the splicing of eyes, one could just tie off two ends of a bight of
rope (call it one BIG eye) to the bar; or bend them together (Twin Bowlines,
leaving about, oh, a foot of doubled lines between the knots, for hands!?) and
tie off the two slings with a girth or Prusik hitch to the bar.  You did say you have
LOTS of rope, so doubling it in this way helps put more of it to use.

--dl*
====

A doubled line defeats the purpose of using "instability" which is attained from a single line.

Jimbo

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Re: Securing rope to horizontal bar
« Reply #28 on: May 13, 2006, 09:24:01 AM »
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I'm brand new to knot tying and all these terms, concepts are less than a week old to me, so my ideas and questions might seem brash.

That's what (most of us) are here for.  And what some of us were here for, but have left.

Quote
Thanks for the idea of using a thimble in the eye-splice.

Nay!  I took that from your picture of your Eye Splice!  Look again...  I'll wait...  (click the colored text above)

Back?  Good!  Assuming my monitor & eyeballs aren't conspiring against me, I notice a little shiny line around the inside of the eye.  If it's there, it's called a "thimble".  They are sized the same as the rope, and don't leave much "hand room".  It's to reduce chafing where the rope meets the rode...  (pardon the pun?)

Quote
I'm stuggling with your idea of half-knots and "smooooth"

Sorry about that, Chief!  When I play with ropes over the ceiling beams, they slip sometimes.  "Smooooth" with lots of 'o's is just my way of saying "ordinary 'smooth' may not be enough."  In your frame, you'd have a nifty solution:  With the rope draped over the little handles at the top of your rig, extend your hand, palm up.  Lift the rope off the "handle", pull back a little, and flip your hand over without letting go of the rope.  Let the end fall behind the Standing Part (SPart).  Now you have just made a "turn", which is the loop-like structure in your hand.  Drape that back over the "handle" & you've made a Single Hitch.  This will rub rope against rope & let you put more "wiggle" in your routine without worrying about the rope slipping -- as much.  Don't forget the other side.  (The Single Hitch won't hold much, but it's the start of a good understanding of knottery, too, so...)

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I placed some rubber foam padding around the rope of each eye-splice to grip but it's still overly supple and still requires gloves to be worn.

LOL!!  You should've seen me trying to clamber up my first Bathing Ladder!!  I can imagine!  That "crunchy bone" feeling takes some getting used to.

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I couldn't find anything that resembles traditional Rings or what seems strong enough to use for handles. Now, I'd like to experiment with a thimble and am wondering what kind of material to use....

The thimble is just a way to reduce wear on the rope.  It's hardly big enough to hold that way.  What about wood dowels from your local hardware (building supplies) store?  A 1" (25.4mm) dowel feels pretty strong, and tying them up would give you a couple of nice new knots...

Quote
I start low to the ground and have the safety of my feet if I need to land in case the rope breaks.

Okay, the safety warnings having been loudly proclaimed, it sounds like you're not in any real "danger"...  I sometimes like flipping upside-down & doing "curls" from there.  Well... I have...  (You'll be old some day too!   :-[ ) But I'd never do it under cotton cord!!!  If you're interested, Nylon "anchor plait" or "solid plait" (a rose by any other name...  is a Round Sennit) is nice.  It can't be spliced by mere mortals, but it's very comfortable, and fairly strong, in "comfort-sized" diameters.  Plus, when I washed a piece in the machine, it came out very very "fluffy"...  

Anyway, if you're looking for knotting info, you've come to the Right Place.  Some of the best knottyers on the planet "hang out" here.

Enjoy!

Jimbo
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Dan_Lehman

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Re: Securing rope to horizontal bar
« Reply #29 on: May 14, 2006, 12:48:21 AM »
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Oh so you're a Doc and a strength coach now? Well, thanks for the advice, tubby, ...

Hey, it wasn't MY advice to get 2-ton rope!

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A doubled line defeats the purpose of using "instability" which is attained from a single line.

I don't follow what you're saying, here?  What is this "instability" that
you WANT, and why does it come from a single rope but not a  sling?
(It would be possible to tie a loopknot in the the end of the  sling.)


--dl*
====