Author Topic: .Knot .K.Component and .K.Element  (Read 2986 times)

DerekSmith

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.Knot .K.Component and .K.Element
« on: August 09, 2011, 04:52:31 PM »
The discussion over on Practical Knots relating to 'What Defines a Bowline...' is dying out without having achieved any agreement or consensus.  However, it did provide an invaluable platform to consider one aspect of a working definition in terms of the bowline's functional components.

The Lexicon of Nodeology already contains terms for the parts of the bowline loop knot-

It has a .Load,  a .Ring and a .Tail_End, and it is classified as a K.Ring_Type binding, but that is as far as the Lexicon presently goes, it looks at the whole .Binding, and not within the actual .Knot itself.

In the 'What Defines a Bowline...' topic, I proposed that the bowline .Knot had two functional 'Components', these being the Bight Component (BC) and the Half Hitch Component (HhC) and that these were arranged so that they were mutually contained by each other.

That is how the knot starts out having been carefully dressed and set, but as I have mentioned before, I see 'knots' as dynamic analogue force machines, that is, machines which respond in a continuous (analogue) manner to the work they are doing or forces they are balancing.  The Bowline turned out to be an excellent example of how the components responded to load, in particular, how the Half Hitch Component progressively morphed under load into a Turn Component, with the potential to proceedfurther into an opening helix (right hand helix for the ABoK 1010) under certain extreme conditions.

This lead me to realise that the components themselves were dynamic as well as interactive, and that we should probably need to go yet further and consider the .Elements of the .Components.  This is especially important if we want to be able to 'work with' /describe the Simple Hitch - Half Hitch - Turn - Helix progression.

So  - .Bindings are made up of parts such as SP, .Knot, loop, end etc
        .Knots are made up of .Components (.K.Components)
and   .Components are made up of .Elements

and these .Knots, .Components and .Elements all have conditions and properties which respond to load forces.

Note to self -  sometimes simplification brings clarity  -  sometimes it doesn't

I now have to start with some simple examples to identify a basic set of .Components and see if it is possible to identify .Elements and the properties that define them...

Derek



DerekSmith

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Re: .Knot .K.Component and .K.Element
« Reply #1 on: August 23, 2011, 09:36:38 AM »
I have been working on ways to visualise and produce images of the various active components.

I am aiming for images of the complete .Knot and then the ability to progressively 'fade' either of the components to leave the other component as if frozen in place.  I would like to be able to create a library of .Components, and to be able to compare their forms when mated to various counter components, and from this, to potentialyl model the force vectors involved.

First I tried 'setting' a component with superglue before untying and removing the counter component, leaving (hopefully) the 'fixed' component.  This didn't work because the glue would not penetrate the cord when it was under tension, but very effectively bonded component and counter component so I couldn't get them apart.

Then I tried replacing the core in a braided rope with a core of polymer clay, but the clay remained far too flexible and allowed the component to relax after untying - this method might still have some merit if I lightly 'bake' the knot before untying.

The method I am now setting up to try is to make a core out of malleable aluminium wire in the hope that this will retain its shape.

Anyone got any other ideas?


Derek

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Re: .Knot .K.Component and .K.Element
« Reply #2 on: August 23, 2011, 12:41:37 PM »
Google for "blender knots", and you will find the add-on for torus use. Here is one: http://www.blendernation.com/2010/05/25/torus-knot-plus-add-on-for-blender-2-5/

Drawing formation/deformation of asymmetrical knots is probably a bit more demanding. Hopefully though, rewarding. The effort will then of course be reusable in other forms. Here is a forum thread dealing with exactly this: http://blenderunderground.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=2465


On a side note: Why are there dots in front of your key words? Should you name a file or directory that way, they turn invisible in most modern OS:es. Maybe even in Windows.

DerekSmith

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Re: .Knot .K.Component and .K.Element
« Reply #3 on: August 23, 2011, 04:01:22 PM »
Google for "blender knots", and you will find the add-on for torus use. Here is one: http://www.blendernation.com/2010/05/25/torus-knot-plus-add-on-for-blender-2-5/

Drawing formation/deformation of asymmetrical knots is probably a bit more demanding. Hopefully though, rewarding. The effort will then of course be reusable in other forms. Here is a forum thread dealing with exactly this: http://blenderunderground.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=2465


Interesting find, but not applicable to my task in hand.  The utility displays things that are known i.e. shapes, formulae etc. while what I am attempting to achieve is a picture of inside a knot of the way components really respond to load forces, i.e. what is, as yet, not known...

My trials with malleable aluminium wire proved to be a failure, because the wire was essentially incompressible (to normal knot load forces) so stayed round at all times (much as the utility models), while in reality, at tight bends the cordage flattens and in 'nips' it is constricted.

So, I am going to go back to the polymer clay core braid which distorts much as natural cord does, and see if I can set the component with mild heating/drying.

Quote
On a side note: Why are there dots in front of your key words? Should you name a file or directory that way, they turn invisible in most modern OS:es. Maybe even in Windows.

The shorthand is as per the Lexicon of Nodeology  We should be safe so long as we retain the lexicon within a word processor or within an html page.  Dot notation is commonplace in programming and again is quite safe within text packages.

Derek

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Re: .Knot .K.Component and .K.Element
« Reply #4 on: August 23, 2011, 05:01:58 PM »
My trials with malleable aluminium wire proved to be a failure, because the wire was essentially incompressible (to normal knot load forces) so stayed round at all times (much as the utility models), while in reality, at tight bends the cordage flattens and in 'nips' it is constricted.

Have you tried copper wire? There are types with single, few and many strands of copper.

Quote
The shorthand is as per the Lexicon of Nodeology  We should be safe so long as we retain the lexicon within a word processor or within an html page.  Dot notation is commonplace in programming and again is quite safe within text packages.

There is no such thing as safe. Seeing as the lexicon isn't 100 years yet, I recommend for you to reconsider before it is set in stone. I suggest ? or '. The dot is likely to bite you somewhere awkward when you least expect it. Mainly just because it's use elsewhere. As for text, the dot is specifically used to end a sentence.

DerekSmith

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Re: .Knot .K.Component and .K.Element
« Reply #5 on: August 23, 2011, 07:10:04 PM »
Hi Wed,

I have found some woven copper mesh, I will give it a try.

Re dot notation.  Agreed, there is no such thing as fully safe, and 100 years from now is a long way into a very busy future, but today dot notation is a common and important part of CSS which is growing in importance in web scripting i.e.

ul.ads, ul.sponsors{
margin:0;
padding:0;
list-style:none;
}
ul.ads li, ul.sponsors li{
background:#c5daaf;
width:235px;
margin:10px 0;
border:solid 1px #81ab64;
text-align:center;
line-height:0;
}

Also, a period denoting the end of a sentence is always followed by two spaces, while dot notation is followed by another character, and camel case where capitals are embedded within a string word (a compound word) is standard practice in just about every programming language.  So perhaps I should rephrase my comment to 'so long as there is CSS, we should be safe...'

The alternative future route might be to define our lexicon as a Markup Language, then it will be interpreted  in line with the lexicon definition.    i.e we preface any document with a line such as IGKTML and give a web address for the definition document and the use of the dot notation is defined for that one document.

Derek

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Re: .Knot .K.Component and .K.Element
« Reply #6 on: August 23, 2011, 10:06:27 PM »
In each of the lines of code you have showed, none started with a dot. The dot start is the problem. If that is not going to happen, I have nothing further to add about the issue.