Author Topic: Alternative way to finnish off lashings?  (Read 3527 times)

Hrungnir

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Alternative way to finnish off lashings?
« on: June 26, 2011, 06:51:07 PM »
As I broke my parents garden furniture, I tried to repair them using lashings. My bodyweight (115lbs) was just too much for the cheap plastic furniture.

The traditional knot to finish off lashings is the Clove Hitch. As the furniture was made of plastic and the twine was made of polyester, it took less than 30 minutes before the Clove Hitch had worked loose. I used Two Half Hitches instead, but the knot was hard to tie in this situation and very difficult to get tight.

My question is: which knot(s) can I use to replace the Clove Hitch in such a situation, dealing with these modern materials?
« Last Edit: June 26, 2011, 07:00:31 PM by Hrungnir »

SS369

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Re: Alternative way to finnish off lashings?
« Reply #1 on: June 26, 2011, 07:21:50 PM »
Hi Hrungnir ,

I usually tie off with a constrictor or one of that family of knots. If you can tie a clove or overhand the others are just a step away.
Hope this helped.

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Dan_Lehman

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Re: Alternative way to finnish off lashings?
« Reply #2 on: June 27, 2011, 07:11:47 PM »
As I broke my parents garden furniture, I tried to repair them using lashings. My bodyweight (115lbs) was just too much for the cheap plastic furniture.

The traditional knot to finish off lashings is the Clove Hitch. As the furniture was made of plastic and the twine was made of polyester, it took less than 30 minutes before the Clove Hitch had worked loose. I used Two Half Hitches instead, but the knot was hard to tie in this situation and very difficult to get tight.

My question is: which knot(s) can I use to replace the Clove Hitch in such a situation, dealing with these modern materials?

Why replace, vs. combine --i.e., use the clove hitch to get tight,
then secure that with the clove-hitch noose (aka "2 H-H").
Possibly on this finishing hitch, you can tie it around both two lines
as a guard against the rotation Korgan cites.   And an overhand stopper
can secure the final hitch.

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Hrungnir

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Re: Alternative way to finnish off lashings?
« Reply #3 on: June 27, 2011, 08:52:31 PM »
Why replace, vs. combine --i.e., use the clove hitch to get tight,
then secure that with the clove-hitch noose (aka "2 H-H").
Possibly on this finishing hitch, you can tie it around both two lines
as a guard against the rotation Korgan cites.   And an overhand stopper
can secure the final hitch.
I thought of securing the Clove Hitch with Two Half Hitches, but the standing part was pressed against the object, and it was difficult to pass the working end under it. When tying the Two Half Hitches alone, I had to tie the knot first and then tighten, passing rope through the knot.

I usually tie off with a constrictor or one of that family of knots. If you can tie a clove or overhand the others are just a step away.
Hope this helped.
The single or double Constrictor will be an improvement indeed, and a very helpful suggestion. I guess Korgan is right about the knot might loosen still in some materials.

Japanese square lashings seems to be identical to ordinary square lashings, just working with both ends. Finnishing off with either a Granny or a Surgeons Knot, when the Reef Knot might loosen.

SS369

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Re: Alternative way to finnish off lashings?
« Reply #4 on: June 27, 2011, 09:14:27 PM »
The lashing cord is going to influence things greatly, but if you truly make your lashing tight and add enough frapping turns (either lashing method) it will go a long way towards holding things in place.
Possibly the wetting will aid in tightening and staying so. Even paracord will shrink.
Could always coat your repair with some varnish as well. ;-)
Have fun!

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Dan_Lehman

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Re: Alternative way to finnish off lashings?
« Reply #5 on: June 28, 2011, 06:24:16 AM »

Quote
The single or double Constrictor will be an improvement indeed, ...

???   How does one AT ALL tie off tightly with a constrictor ?!

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Hrungnir

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Re: Alternative way to finnish off lashings?
« Reply #6 on: June 28, 2011, 04:03:19 PM »

Quote
The single or double Constrictor will be an improvement indeed, ...

???   How does one AT ALL tie off tightly with a constrictor ?!
You are right that the Constrictor has some limitations when tying off tightly is important. I didn't have access to the end of the object, the tying situation was a bit awkward  so a Clove Hitch wasn't ideal for tying off tightly either. The Constrictor is less prone to loosening than the Clove, so I would call the Constrictor an improvement for this specific task yes, even if it gives a bit more slack than the Clove.


SS369

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Re: Alternative way to finnish off lashings?
« Reply #7 on: June 28, 2011, 07:41:11 PM »
I personally have a spike handy when I am going to do knot work. A stout nail or something handy (much greater purchase on the cord/rope) as such, allows the tightening of the parts of the constrictor, etc.  A hard yank on the working end finalizes the locking down.
Riggers use tools all the time for such events.

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Hrungnir

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Re: Alternative way to finnish off lashings?
« Reply #8 on: December 10, 2011, 10:14:42 PM »
Quote from: Hrungnir
The traditional knot to finish off lashings is the Clove Hitch. As the furniture was made of plastic and the twine was made of polyester, it took less than 30 minutes before the Clove Hitch had worked loose. I used Two Half Hitches instead, but the knot was hard to tie in this situation and very difficult to get tight.

My question is: which knot(s) can I use to replace the Clove Hitch in such a situation, dealing with these modern materials?

Why replace, vs. combine --i.e., use the clove hitch to get tight,
then secure that with the clove-hitch noose (aka "2 H-H").
The garden furniture still holds. If i remember correctly, I used a lot of round turns, clove hitch and then finished off with two half hitches. I wonder if the combination rolling hitch and two half hitches would be even better suited than the clove hitch and two half hitches?