Author Topic: Most practical noose?  (Read 16614 times)

Hrungnir

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Most practical noose?
« on: January 23, 2011, 08:30:23 PM »
When talking about knots, we usually talk about bends, hitches, binders and fixed loops, but not that much about nooses (slip loops).

Especially in household settings I find nooses as good choices for the specific situations i encounter. Sometimes you just want a hitch with binding qualities, which some nooses offer. These knots can also work as a quick binder, where security isn't that important. Other times you just need an eye which slips without too much resistance, like a slipped bowline. Perhaps you consider an adjustable grip hitch as a noose too?

The question is: which of the nooses is/are your favorite(s) and those you find as the most practical useful. Which of the noses are you most often using in your everyday life?


The one I use the most, is the strangle-snare (double overhand noose).
 

knot4u

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Re: Most practical noose?
« Reply #1 on: January 23, 2011, 09:38:02 PM »
When talking about knots, we usually talk about bends, hitches, binders and fixed loops, but not that much about nooses (slip loops).

Especially in household settings I find nooses as good choices for the specific situations i encounter. Sometimes you just want a hitch with binding qualities, which some nooses offer. These knots can also work as a quick binder, where security isn't that important. Other times you just need an eye which slips without too much resistance, like a slipped bowline. Perhaps you consider an adjustable grip hitch as a noose too?

The question is: which of the nooses is/are your favorite(s) and those you find as the most practical useful. Which of the noses are you most often using in your everyday life?


The one I use the most, is the strangle-snare (double overhand noose).

For the category of slip loop, the following knots are on my favorites list:

-Halter (quick and dirty, gets the job done most times)
-Siberian Hitch (aka, Fig 8 Halter)
-Slipped Buntline (oh yes it can make a slip loop)
-Two Half Hitches (oh yes it can make a slip loop)
-Girth Hitch (yeah, it's sort of a slip loop)
-Running Bowline (or Running "Any Fixed Loop")
-Uni Knot (yes, the one for fishing, this is literally my most used noose)

By the way, I don't consider friction hitches (e.g., Adjustable Grip, Blake, Tautline, etc.) to be nooses.
« Last Edit: April 13, 2011, 09:01:09 PM by knot4u »

Hrungnir

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Re: Most practical noose?
« Reply #2 on: January 24, 2011, 12:54:44 AM »
Nice list of slip loops Knot4u :)

The halter hitch is pretty much an overhand noose with a slip for quick release? I can understand the need for the slip, because the overhand noose can jam around the object if loaded heavily (example: capsized marlinspike hitch).

And siberian is a figure 8 noose with also a slip for quik release, yes. Well known knots, but with different names after different tying methods and and new features added (the noose and slip);)

I especially liked the Uni Knot as your choice for everyday tasks. Fishing knots are often knots we rarely use outside fishing activities. When we don't go fishing very often, we'll forget the knots and have to relearn them before next fishing trip. By finding a fishing knot for everyday tasks, you'll always have a fishing knot fresh in your memory (fingers) when needing one ;)
« Last Edit: January 24, 2011, 12:59:22 AM by Hrungnir »

SS369

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Re: Most practical noose?
« Reply #3 on: January 24, 2011, 04:44:54 AM »
Hello Hrungnir,

I have two "go to" nooses, but I will usually let the task determine what I actually use of those two and if they're the best I can use. If not then I tie something else.

The timber hitch is one I use to make a noose although it is a hitch. It just plainly works good for a lot of situations.
The other is a perfection loop that is the sliding, "running" part of the noose.
Both have always untied as needed and are really easy to tie.


SS

rusty427

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Re: Most practical noose?
« Reply #4 on: January 24, 2011, 08:57:29 AM »
Hi Hrungnir,

Here is a couple I like, the top one is something I made up based on a Hunters Bend geometry, and the bottom one I use a lot because it holds fast when set and loosens easily, it is great for holding doors open or securing things that you want to get at. I have forgotten the name of it, I think it might be a climbers knot, I have seen it used as an adjustable bend as well. Who can name it? (Knot4u, it might be an adjustable grip?) I can make the top one into a stopper as well which can looks pretty.
SS the Perfection loop is a nice looking knot is it the same or similar to a Tugboat Bowline?

« Last Edit: January 24, 2011, 09:01:33 AM by rusty427 »

SaltyCracker

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Re: Most practical noose?
« Reply #5 on: January 24, 2011, 10:39:37 AM »
Budworth calls the lower loop in xarax photo as Adjustable Loop. Ultimate Ency. of Knots & Ropework. pp197.

Top one looks like ABoK 1125 a Mathew Walker look-alike.
« Last Edit: January 24, 2011, 11:41:20 AM by SaltyCracker »

SaltyCracker

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Re: Most practical noose?
« Reply #6 on: January 24, 2011, 12:22:14 PM »
I use tandem ABoK 1125s and a button knot to attach my coffee cup to my back pack. They provide a way to create an expandable "button hole" between two legs of a lanyard. having two allows a choice of which two button holes the one between the two 1125s or the one between the knife lanyard knot and the 1125 above it. Depends upon how large of a loop you need. Never had it fail.

« Last Edit: January 24, 2011, 12:23:07 PM by SaltyCracker »

SS369

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Re: Most practical noose?
« Reply #7 on: January 24, 2011, 04:24:57 PM »
Hello Rusty,

Nice pair of loops. I'd like to see the top one from different angles if if you another picture of it.

As for the question of Tugboat versus Perfection loops, I'll direct you to some interesting reading here >  http://igkt.net/sm/index.php?topic=112.0

I think you may just get your answer.  ;-)

SS

SS369

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Re: Most practical noose?
« Reply #8 on: January 24, 2011, 04:34:10 PM »
Hi SaltyCracker.

Neat little device for your pack pack. So many things that people do are very cool when tying up for a task.

But, I don't think it is a noose in the strictest sense of the word.
To me a noose is a non-fixed loop that can be adjusted from the almost total length of the rope/cord to the smallest possible opening.

I copied the definition to here: noose - a loop formed in a cord or rope by means of a slipknot; it binds tighter as the cord or rope is pulled, a loop in the end of a rope or cord, such as a lasso, snare, or hangman's halter, usually tied with a slipknot.

But I suppose that a noose doesn't have to be on the end.

I think I will tie your device and see how it works for some of my tools. Thanks

SS

knot4u

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Re: Most practical noose?
« Reply #9 on: January 24, 2011, 06:08:10 PM »
Hi Hrungnir,

Here is a couple I like, the top one is something I made up based on a Hunters Bend geometry, and the bottom one I use a lot because it holds fast when set and loosens easily, it is great for holding doors open or securing things that you want to get at. I have forgotten the name of it, I think it might be a climbers knot, I have seen it used as an adjustable bend as well. Who can name it? (Knot4u, it might be an adjustable grip?) I can make the top one into a stopper as well which can looks pretty.
SS the Perfection loop is a nice looking knot is it the same or similar to a Tugboat Bowline?



For the lower loop, "Adjustable Grip Hitch" is the name to use if you want to find it with Google.
« Last Edit: January 24, 2011, 08:51:47 PM by knot4u »

rusty427

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Re: Most practical noose?
« Reply #10 on: January 25, 2011, 12:16:58 PM »

 I'd like to see the top one from different angles if if you another picture of it.


Hi SS,
I don't know how practical it is! but its a bit of fun. Thanks for the link by the way, interesting.




This shows how it compliments the Hunters Bend.


rusty

« Last Edit: January 25, 2011, 12:21:32 PM by rusty427 »

xarax

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Twisted Hunter s bend
« Reply #11 on: January 25, 2011, 12:44:25 PM »
   "Twisted Hunter s bend". ( posted previously in threads : (1), (2))
   The third variation/picture is identical with a "Hunters X bend", where the tails of a parent Hunter s bend are crossed (: X) before they exit the knot s nub. It is also identical, in its compact form, with MWalker two strands knot / true lovers knot.

1. http://igkt.net/sm/index.php?topic=2019
2. http://igkt.net/sm/index.php?topic=2046
« Last Edit: February 01, 2011, 11:02:55 AM by xarax »
This is not a knot.

rusty427

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Re: Twisted Hunter s bend
« Reply #12 on: January 25, 2011, 12:51:42 PM »
Twisted Hunter s bend, three variations. ( posted previously in another thread)

Thanks xarax, I particularly like #3.

galilnoks

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Re: Most practical noose?
« Reply #13 on: January 30, 2011, 09:19:55 PM »
The most interesting nooses to me are:

Scaffold Noose (ABOK#1120) which is tied overhand; it has supporting wraps, but a severe first curve.

Gallows Noose (ABOK#1121) which is tied 'underhand'; it has a gentle first curve but the wraps aren't supporting.  (It almost looks as if it was designed for the very purpose of reducing the severity of the first curve.) 

Many experts think that knot strength is increased by reduced severity of the first curve, or by tight supporting wraps around the first curve.  The two nooses split those advantages.  Does anyone have experience about how it turns out in practice -- whether one of these two nooses is stronger than the other?

knot4u

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Re: Most practical noose?
« Reply #14 on: January 30, 2011, 10:16:41 PM »
Regarding strength of nooses, it may be useful to defer to what fishermen have learned over many years.  Fishermen have ample experience with discovering which nooses are strong in fishing line. For example, the Uni Knot and the San Diego Jam have proven to be relatively strong nooses for fishing purposes. Whether of not this data transfers to rope, who knows?  Regardless, I think data from fishermen is a good starting point.  
« Last Edit: January 30, 2011, 10:46:15 PM by knot4u »