Author Topic: What's the secure way to tie off a trucker's hitch  (Read 12704 times)

Dan_Lehman

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Re: What's the secure way to tie off a trucker's hitch
« Reply #15 on: January 22, 2011, 05:58:37 AM »
In the video, it's not a Twistedore.
Before this continues and gets out of hand; where are you getting your definition of what a "Twistedore" is?

I defined "Twistedore" above in reference to posted videos.  It's basically Stevedore slip loop, but tied haphazardly and possibly with more wraps.


But you just posted, ...

He DID?  Whoooops, ... ghost post !!

Awww, dang : "I'm disappointed that many threads I liked are too hard to follow due to deletions".
If only "the moderators fix some problems with the forum"!!
Stop him from breaking his wishes again!!  --it's self-flagellation!

 :D

Dan_Lehman

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Re: What's the secure way to tie off a trucker's hitch
« Reply #16 on: January 27, 2011, 06:53:34 AM »
Regarding the rope I'm using at the moment, it is a fairly well worn rope having come out of my jon boat. That's probably a big issue, what type of rope is best for outdoor use such as fishing and tying off ladders? There's lots of different roping on the market and some of it is garbage IMO, very tough to tie good knots with.

I've watched that video at least a dozen times, it looks like he's tying a twistadore, then a half hitch, then comes through and ties a couple of half hitches on the bottom??? He sure as hell gets a tight tie and pull.

As for ropes, well, there are --as you note-- all kinds.  In your case,
an elastic one might help give some pressure on the ladder?  So,
nylon, which has decent UV resistance (usually).  But you ought
to be able to work with a variety of cordage, for that matter, and
polypropylene is pretty common and cheap.  (It might not be all
so commonly given good UV inhibitors/stabilizers; ropes used by
marine industry / commercial fishers seems to endure more than
stuff seen commonly around away from the shore, IMO. !?)
Now that there is much cable-laying work going on, I see much
cable-pulling lubricated thin polyester webbing being used for
tie-downs.  Whatever's handy ... .


As for tying off the trucker's hitch, you can try putting in a
turn (aka "round turn" sometimes) around the parallel lines
(going to & back from the anchorage to the sheave), and
then simply jamming the tail between them close to this
turn which seized them together; and then finish off
with two half-hitches if not happy with the jam (which
I might not be!).

--dl*
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