Author Topic: How do you practice knot tying?  (Read 15233 times)

knot4u

  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1076
How do you practice knot tying?
« on: June 02, 2010, 04:05:58 AM »
My preferred method involves using 72" boot laces that I can stuff in my pants pocket.  The laces have also come in handy for tying real stuff.

How do you practice?
« Last Edit: June 02, 2010, 04:07:08 AM by knot4u »

trade use only

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 23
Re: How do you practice knot tying?
« Reply #1 on: June 02, 2010, 07:26:00 AM »
I used to keep a couple of lengths of 10mm rope in my bag.  Good for practicing on train journeys and the like.  Obviously don't practice Jack Ketch's knots on a train - seems to cause alarming reactions.

Transminator

  • Exp. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 144
Re: How do you practice knot tying?
« Reply #2 on: June 02, 2010, 03:42:15 PM »
I almost always have a piece of blind string or alike with me so that I am always prepared to try out new knots or tying methods I find here or on the web.
My keyring often serves as an object for practicing hitches on etc.
Also it is always better to have a piece of string and not need it, then needing one and not have it.  :D

My preferred practicing spot is at home on the stairs. It has a landing and a gallery on top. There I can hoist stuff up, lower objects, test loop knots, rope ladders etc. I use the railings on both sides to practice tensioning knots and hitches and have a nice view out the window as well.
A nice side effect is that my little son (4) joins me there sometimes to play fisherman or animal rescue in which we use the ropes. Maybe that way he will get an interest in knotting when he gets older...

jcsampson

  • Exp. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 133
  • Major Proponent of the Fixed-Gripper Constructs
Re: How do you practice knot tying?
« Reply #3 on: June 02, 2010, 08:08:25 PM »
Quote from: knot4u
"My preferred method involves using 72" boot laces that I can stuff in my pants pocket. . . . How do you practice?"

I currently have hanging around for knotting enjoyment 27" hollow-braid "casual" shoe laces, a five-foot piece of 3/8" hollow-braid polypropylene (which has a safe working load of roughly 200 pounds and costs only 5 bucks per 50 feet!), an eleven-foot piece of 7/16" solid-braid nylon rope, a three-foot piece of 1/4" solid-braid nylon-polyester blend, some 3/16" twisted polypropylene, some 3/16" kernmantle (in case I need to try a knot using kernmantle, which I generally dislike), some (utterly horrible) twisted nylon string (which can't hold its twist to save its life), and some very excellent flat-braid nylon mason string.

My current favorites are the hollow-braid shoe laces, the flat-braid nylon mason string (which is durable beyond belief), and the 7/16" solid-braid nylon rope.

I've even been known to make knots using waxed dental floss. If a knot can pass the waxed-dental-floss test, you know you've got a winner.

Quote from: trade use only
"Obviously don't practice Jack Ketch's knots on a train - seem to cause alarming reactions."

We knotters will always be misunderstood. I say "knotter," they say "nutter."

Quote from: Transminator
". . . it is always better to have a piece of string and not need it, [than to need one] and not have it. . . ."

That statement is downright beautiful. It reveals that you are a true knotter.

JCS

Sweeney

  • Global Moderator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 975
Re: How do you practice knot tying?
« Reply #4 on: June 03, 2010, 02:42:10 PM »
I've even been known to make knots using waxed dental floss. If a knot can pass the waxed-dental-floss test, you know you've got a winner.

Have you ever tried strimmer line? It's solid springy nylon and many knots simply fall apart. Good test of some knots though.

Barry

jcsampson

  • Exp. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 133
  • Major Proponent of the Fixed-Gripper Constructs
Re: How do you practice knot tying?
« Reply #5 on: June 03, 2010, 11:56:29 PM »
Hmmm. Strimmer line. I'll keep that in mind. Thanks, Barry.

Oh! British for String Trimmer!

Yeah, we just call 'em string trimmers.

JCS

Sheetbend

  • New Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1
Re: How do you practice knot tying?
« Reply #6 on: August 17, 2013, 09:00:46 AM »
My current favorite rope for learning knots is an 8 foot piece of 8mm Ocean Polyester cord.  This rope is popular with tree climbers as a Prusik Cord.

After four years of constant use, it shows virtually no wear and holds its shape perfectly so you can see the knot. After learning the knot one way, I can learn the knot backwards by slowly untying it in reverse. 

Learning the Alpine Butterfly and Double Dragon in reverse taught me how to use these knots for securing around a post or tree; somthing I couldn't learn until I taught myself by learning them in reverse.


Dan_Lehman

  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3794
Re: How do you practice knot tying?
« Reply #7 on: August 19, 2013, 06:36:36 PM »
My current favorite rope for learning knots is an 8 foot piece of 8mm Ocean Polyester cord.

Yeah, this is a good size for feel in the hands,
substance w/o bulk, and maybe some attractiveness
to boot.

But at some point, one could need to learn how to tie
knots in a particular material --which might seem
like UNlearning past ways or methods or knots.  One
needs to be open to thinking "this material is secure
when so-knotted" versus "this knot is secure"!

 :)
--dl*
====

kd8eeh

  • Exp. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 159
Re: How do you practice knot tying?
« Reply #8 on: August 21, 2013, 06:45:20 AM »
I personally use boot laces.  I always make it a point to have at least two so that I can teach someone else a knot on the fortunate occasion where someone expresses interest in knots, or so that I still have one in case I need to use the other for anything.  Granted any tangle will bind and seem secure, but aglets are exceptionally useful for decorative knotting, as they eliminate the need for hooks and needles. 

Sweeney

  • Global Moderator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 975
Re: How do you practice knot tying?
« Reply #9 on: August 21, 2013, 01:29:50 PM »
I thought I would see what is in my back pocket:

3 short pieces of paracord (2 UK polypropylene only useful for light use eg hanging tools and one USA made 550 nylon)
About a metre of blind cord - very round and solid braided cord about 3mm - shows the structure of knots very well and I use this for demonstration usually.
1.5 metres of 6mm polyester (3 strand laid cord) I generally use to try out knots  esp. bowline variations as they appear. Nice and soft to handle.
And handy I have a piece (about 1.5m again) of Beal  'semi-static Antipodean '10.5 mm rope when I want to see a knot in something.
heavier (but it won't go into my pocket or if it does sitting becomes pretty uncomfortable).

Barry

[Inkanyezi] gone

  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 340
    • Pro three strand splice
Re: How do you practice knot tying?
« Reply #10 on: August 28, 2013, 08:29:11 AM »
When I find a need for practising, I use the material that is relevant to the task. I.e. when practising the slipknot method of tying a bowline, when I expect to use it in medium heavy stuff, I use that kind of cordage, ordinary mooring line.

For the sake of learning, as when trying out a new method to tie a particular knot, anything that kan be knotted will do, electric cable if there's no cordage around. But for actually practising, when I see a need to, I use the stuff that's relevant to the task.

And I don't carry any odd cordage in my pockets, although my bicycle basket has a few lengths of cord that is used for tying things to the rack. It has been a long time before I had to learn a new knot, the last one was the Gleipnir a couple of years ago now. I use it whenever I tie anything to the bicycle. I also lately invented an easy method to tie the zeppelin bend/loop, which I practised a few times with the same stuff as I use for the bike. But apart from that, no practising.

I guess practising is when learning something new, and after so many years, there's not so much news.
All images and text of mine published on the IGKT site is licensed according to a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/

DerekSmith

  • IGKT Member
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1518
  • Knot Botherer
    • ALbion Alliance
Re: How do you practice knot tying?
« Reply #11 on: February 27, 2014, 12:13:55 AM »
I normally carry two 3ft lengths of what is generally called 'blind cord' a solid white 3mm polyester braid.  It is slick and quite stiff, and generally quite unforgiving on knots which are not 'designed' to auto lock.

Generally, I do not 'practice' as such, other than to remember a knot that is slipping from memory.  Mostly, I am using it to identify the component structures that constitute a knot and contribute to its operation.  For this, the 3mm is ideal because you can see how a knot naturally reconforms itself as load is progressively applied to a loose structure.  one of my favourites to watch is the carrick mat morphing into the carrick knot - absolutely different creatures.

Derek

xarax

  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2781
Re: How do you practice knot tying?
« Reply #12 on: February 27, 2014, 04:52:36 PM »
... 3mm is ideal because you can see ...

   Using a new pair of glasses, I suppose.  :) I prefer 6mm and beyond, because I love to leave my glasses on the desk. Anything that a 3mm cord will do, a 6mm cord will do as well - you have just to pull it a little more.

This is not a knot.

enhaut

  • Exp. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 163
Re: How do you practice knot tying?
« Reply #13 on: March 10, 2014, 06:44:57 PM »
Hi, it's my first time here.
I practice with an upside down stool, 3 different ropes, plus a wooden ring.
I hope the photo will help you understand.
This contraption stands beside me while I am looking at the screem trying to reproduce any knot.

enhaut

enhaut

  • Exp. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 163
Re: How do you practice knot tying?
« Reply #14 on: March 10, 2014, 11:12:56 PM »
Thanks @ xarax
Your pseudo is symetrical!
The cow hitch is indeed fun to tie.
Been looking throw your previous post, I will have fun working the binder' series!