Author Topic: Unlaying twisted nylon rope.  (Read 3358 times)

Rrok007

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Unlaying twisted nylon rope.
« on: March 04, 2010, 03:03:37 PM »
Figured this should go here instead of in the decorative area.


Looking for advice on the best way to unlay nylon rope.

I pretty much work only with the Lehigh brand nylon rope cause it takes dye better than that EB brand Home Depot sells.
I was using their twisted nylon rope and was unlaying it the entire length to have three separate strands.

It was a pain in the butt.

I ran into two main problems. The first being that as I was unlaying the individual strands, they would twist around themselves and get all kinked up. The second problems was in trying to get them straight. I was basically running my hand down the length of each strand, forcing them to unwind and remove the kinks. This works, except that it causes the rope to unravel slightly near the end, which then has to be trimmed off. I'm only losing a few inches at most, but it's annoying.


So, does anyone have advice on how to do this better?

Dan_Lehman

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Re: Unlaying twisted nylon rope.
« Reply #1 on: March 04, 2010, 07:55:53 PM »
Figured this should go here instead of in the decorative area.

You saw something "Practical" here?!  :D  ;D   ::)

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Looking for advice on the best way to unlay nylon rope.

Many are no doubt curious about Why ... ? --as am I?!

Quote
So, does anyone have advice on how to do this better?

Seems to me that the ideal solution is to somehow get a rope-making (laid)
machine to run in reverse, putting the appropriate torsion to rope/strands.
My mind is otherwise running to somehow attaching (temporarily and
variously located) strands to swivels up high, suspending weight on the
rope, and pulling down through it with a bar to hasten the unlaying
-- hoping those swivels allow the torquing of strands to be relieved.

--dl*
====

wood

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Re: Unlaying twisted nylon rope.
« Reply #2 on: March 04, 2010, 09:39:21 PM »
I always unlay an inch then burn my ends.

Never tried my rope machine backwards.

If I'm going to unlay a long piece, I make tamales as I go.

Rrok007

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Re: Unlaying twisted nylon rope.
« Reply #3 on: March 05, 2010, 03:42:30 PM »
Figured this should go here instead of in the decorative area.

You saw something "Practical" here?!  :D  ;D   ::)

Yes, I know... foolish me.  ;)

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Looking for advice on the best way to unlay nylon rope.

Many are no doubt curious about Why ... ? --as am I?!

In short, longevity and economy.

I have a friend that wants me to make him one a rope flogger similar to the one I posted in the decorative knots area. He wanted to know if I could make it look more like natural rope, without actually using natural rope. So he wanted the look of natural fibers, but the longevity of the synthetic fibers.

The economic part comes in because I'm living paycheck to paycheck, so I can't exactly spend a lot of money. The flogger design uses around 125' of rope. The rope I choose, 100' of 1/4" twisted, when unlayed, effectively gives me 300' of the size rope I need. That's enough to make 2 for just less than what it costs to make 1 from nylon solid braid.

Quote
So, does anyone have advice on how to do this better?

Seems to me that the ideal solution is to somehow get a rope-making (laid)
machine to run in reverse, putting the appropriate torsion to rope/strands.
My mind is otherwise running to somehow attaching (temporarily and
variously located) strands to swivels up high, suspending weight on the
rope, and pulling down through it with a bar to hasten the unlaying
-- hoping those swivels allow the torquing of strands to be relieved.

--dl*
====

Too bad I neither own, nor can afford a rope making machine. Your other idea could be a little more feasable. I have an open closet that I do a lot of the rope work with. I could mount an eye hook in the center of the top of the door frame, unlay the individual strands, feed them through the wire rack, and then attach weights to the ends and just slowly feed the rope through. Hadn't thought of that before.

Dan_Lehman

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Re: Unlaying twisted nylon rope.
« Reply #4 on: March 05, 2010, 07:22:01 PM »
More musing ... :

a) have the rope source such that one can easily pull out
 the right length (for some in-house rise, 4-6');

b) pull rope such that it is unlayed by some device, be it
 hooks or a couple carabiners, which device is

c) anchored to the ground & suspended from above, so
 that unlaying occurs BEFORE the change-of-direction point;
 or after rope is pulled over change-of-direction (from vertical
 rise lifting weight to horizontal line of pulling);

d) and arrange to be able to quickly tie off (repeatedly)
 the unlayed strands (perhaps shaking out much torsion
 after each hauling).

Re (c), it is simpler IMO to attach whatever sort of *unlaying*
device AFTER the rope makes the change-of-direction, so that
it need only be tied off to hold against the hauling of the line;
if below/before ..., it would need to be suspended for the time
of non-hauling, and then anchored below, somehow.

Say your change-of-direction device is the cross bar of some
closet (?!).  So, you'd pull back some 5', at which point the
weighted (maybe just five pounds or so) clump of bundled rope
has risen as far as it can (near closet bar, if unlaying structures
come after change-of-direction); then you tie off strands (maybe
letting out torsion -- hmmm, will this help/hurt unlaying?);
and then you untie weighted clump and re-tie with it back
at floor; and repeat 'til done (or you've pulled out the closet
bar, and have a more urgent task to tend to).

 :)