Author Topic: How to Make !  (Read 2552 times)

KenY

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How to Make !
« on: December 31, 2009, 05:19:52 PM »
As a good start to the New Year, I find a thread under a pile of elephant do da. It has rightly been pointed out, we as a Guild are not embracing todays methods of communication as best we can.
A year ago persuaded by my son, I uploaded some knot tying details on 'You Tube', just incase I was run over by a bus; and I failed to inform my knot tying friends of my actions, eg. proof of point.
The Story
I first wrote to KM in 1987 issue7 pg12 and the reply was published in KM 8 pg7. I had asked if there was somebody who still remembered making a perique of tobacco. My quest had started when I had seen a small picture in the book 'The Royal Tour' with no details. As well as publishing a diagram in KM. Frank Thompson gave two presentations at later Guild meetings. Much later and still on my quest I arranged a master class in Des Pawsons garden, so that some of us could get hands on practice.
The video is not a professional documentary, it is just a snapshot of the day, hence instead of young sailors in uniform, with ships fittings about them, you have old men on a cold day in silly hats, working from an appletree.
Knot tying tech note.
The preasure on the tobacco comes from the catenary of the line and your 'large' friend, rather than the leverage from a serving mallet even though the end results look much the same.
So as to information being passed on, those with their own web sites, and more important our own, you may wish to link this one.

How to make a Pereque. You Tube


Happy New Year

Ken     


 

DerekSmith

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Re: How to Make !
« Reply #1 on: January 01, 2010, 12:05:05 PM »
Hi Ken,

I hope that you had a good New Years celebration, and I wish you all the best for 2010.

I had a couple of problems from your post - first, the video link did not seem to have been included.

Second, although I found your questing post in Issue 7 on page 12, I could not find any reference to the reply in issue 8 - indeed, page 7 is part way through an 8 page article on 'Linked Overhand Knots - Part II by Harry Asher' - could you check the details for us please.

A quick Google for 'making a perique of tobacco' found me your video here http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Sqhu11WjC4

I enjoyed the video - the technique of using a tensioned 'winding line' was very clever - I had never seen it before - a simple yet totally effective technique.  'Rope Machines' like this deserve to be identified carefully for our bigger 'educational' picture.

It looked like you all thoroughly enjoyed the event, just a shame that you did not introduce the participants.  Then right at the end you closed the video with a flashback to my childhood "Don't forget to switch off your set, once again a very good night and sleep well" and then the disappearing dot - MAGIC...

Thanks for the video.
Derek

KenY

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Re: How to Make !
« Reply #2 on: January 01, 2010, 04:00:00 PM »
Derek,
Thank you for your reply, sorry for the misinformation of numbers (I must be practicing to be an MP) try KM 9 pgs 7&8.

Yes it was a good day, I failed also to mention the lunch brake, when we got out of the biting Eastcoast East wind, into Liz's warm kitchen, for home made soup and crusty bread. The best part was over a glass of red wine, when a kitchen full of knot tying friends, discussed the different types of Stockholm Tar, that Des had been researching and all the samples were lined up so we could check the colour and viscosity, I am sorry the video camera was not out for that part as well.

Yous Aye

Ken.

DerekSmith

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Re: How to Make !
« Reply #3 on: January 02, 2010, 07:55:47 PM »
Thanks Ken, I found it in KM 9 where you said.

As you know, although I appreciate the skill and art of decorative knotting, my real interest lies in the mechanisms behind why knots work.  However, lately, I have come to realise that even greater enjoyment comes from studying the ingenuity used to create the rope machines used until just a few generations ago, or indeed even still today.  I don't mean rope making machines, but machines made from rope, knots and perhaps a few hooks or anchors.

Machines like the Truckers Hitch - A Clove hitch, a sheepshank, a loop and finished with two half hitches, yet this machine can lash tight the most ungainly of loads, then undo without any struggle even with cold fingers and wet rope that has met the strain of a load trying to break free.

Then there is the delightful 'perique winder' you have just brought us (diagram from KM9 attached).  Two anchors, a clove hitch a round turn and the most critical part, the perpendicular load from a hefty arse.  Yet although it is only part of a man's weight is applied to the rope, the design of the machine applying the load perpendicular to the rope creates an almost infinite mechanical advantage resulting in the production of a rock hard perique devoid of air and ideal for anaerobic fermentation.

Or the log winch, a round turn, a log and a pole arranged in such a wonderfully ingenious manner that a single man can haul a load many times beyond his strength over considerable distances with total control.

These machines are not knots per se, but the combination of knots and ingenious application of forces to achieve tasks way beyond direct human abilities.

This USE of knots and ropes is much akin to various methods of tying - the skill, knowledge and expertise is easily lost leaving only the knots themselves.

Methods of tying and modes of use are areas of knotting that I think we in danger of loosing.  Perhaps a new board is in order :-

Tying Methods and Knot Machines  --  using knots beyond simple bindings.

Thank you for bringing us the 'perique machine' and the technique of applying a huge wrapping force.

Derek