Author Topic: Newbie tying a ring on a necklace  (Read 19843 times)

Dan_Lehman

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Re: Newbie tying a ring on a necklace
« Reply #15 on: November 20, 2009, 06:21:43 PM »
Dan,

To check:  It looks like you effectively have the ring going through two back-to-back symmetrically-tied overhand stopper knots.  Yes?

Um, mirroReflected Overhands, yes, in a sense -- for, really, this
notion began as a sort of variation on the Bull Hitch, bringing the
bight around and between the S.Parts, and then ... I wondered
how to get the bight-tip to lie within the knotting, against the ring
(and I had thought it must be TIB, but tied it longhand (which can
be quickhand vs. trying to solve the TIB question!)).  And, with some
loosening, viola, the Overhands aspect appears.  But set, it will
look more like adjacent Half-hitches (which, yes, for a HH noose, is
what an Overhand is (topologically)).

I think that the "rat tail" material will, by its somewhat *puffy*
compressibility, enable the hard-set knotting to shrink diameter
and bulk and visual presence a little, and stay tied!?

--dl*
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WebAdmin

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Re: Newbie tying a ring on a necklace
« Reply #16 on: November 20, 2009, 11:11:57 PM »
Dan,

To check:  It looks like you effectively have the ring going through two back-to-back symmetrically-tied overhand stopper knots.  Yes?

Um, mirroReflected Overhands, yes, in a sense -- for, really, this
notion began as a sort of variation on the Bull Hitch ...

Good evening gentlemen :)

Do we have a new variant here?  Or has it been documented before?

Regards

Glenys
Lesley
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WebAdmin

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Re: Newbie tying a ring on a necklace
« Reply #17 on: November 21, 2009, 07:26:51 PM »
Incidentally, it's aso secure enough to hitch a battery-powered remote-controlled speedboat to a child's fishing rod (cheap fishing line, using a float as a stopper) so that nobody has to go into freezing water being monitored for blue-green algae when said powerboat runs into diffiulties whilst its 10year-old skipper pursues a drug-running gang ;)

I trust that further tests will come up with a way to keep us from fouling the propellor so often.  But scale force-8 seas don't help either.

Regards, Glenys
Lesley
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