Author Topic: New applications for old knots?  (Read 4987 times)

Lasse_C

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New applications for old knots?
« on: February 22, 2005, 01:07:09 PM »
One of IGKTs primary and most admirable goals is to spread the knowledge of knotting. I have found that a very good way of doing this is to think of new applications for the knots.

A couple of examples:
* Midshipmans Hitch is not only excellent for tent guy lines, it is also superb for hanging flowerpots, being easily adjustable.

* Prusik or Klemheist both do an excellent job of pulling up stakes in the garden (you know, those you put down to support young trees, etc) without damaging the grass or flower bed. Use a strop to tie a Prusik or Klemheist around the stake, get a support and a stiff rod and pull the stake up a bit. Push the knot down and repeat until the stake is out.

And so on, etc.

I would like to hear of other original, funny or otherwise unusual applications for knots. Suggestions, anyone?

Lasse C
« Last Edit: February 22, 2005, 01:13:20 PM by Lasse_C »

Fairlead

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Re: New applications for old knots?
« Reply #1 on: February 22, 2005, 05:07:18 PM »
One of my favourites is the "Poacher's Noose" (aka Double Overhand Loop - Scaffold knot).
This versatile and easily tied noose, which pulls up tight around an object and does not slip, can be used as a "Clamp" or third hand when glueing pieces together.  Also when bookbinding it can be used to hold the end boards to the spine while the glue dries.

Gordon

KnotNow!

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Re: New applications for old knots?
« Reply #2 on: February 22, 2005, 08:04:49 PM »
One of the things about life in the woods is that improvisation is the rule, rather than the exception.  Make do or do without.  This brings us to knots in chain.  Most of my chain is 3/8" and 1/2" (determined by the size of the wire used to form the links) logging chain.  One knot that works wonders is the blackwall hitch, ABOK # 1875.  The timber hitch, ABOK # 195 will often work, especially if, after the hitch you lead the chain along the log and add a single hitch, as in ABOK # 1733.  Moving large rock about you can tie chain as ABOK # 271.  The Pile Hitch, ABOK # 1815 is pretty good too, since we have an abundance of stumps.  Chain just lives to jam up when knotted but shackles and hooks often are not at hand when needed.  These knots have saved my temper and my time.  Lest someone mistake this post as recommended advice let me remind you that these are expedients, which I use; fully understanding the risks  These methods are not approved by any safety board or protected by any code.  Working with logs and stone and heavy weight is always dangerous and when something comes asunder  :ounexpectedly being in the next county is a good plan.  That said.... anyone else knotting chain sucessfully?  :-/
« Last Edit: February 22, 2005, 08:11:27 PM by PABPRES »
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Willeke

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Re: New applications for old knots?
« Reply #3 on: February 22, 2005, 08:53:53 PM »
Good Idea, Lasse,
At work I make labels. Often they are zig-zaged in to stacks. These stacks are tied with two loops of string with a packaging knot. Then they are stored till I need them for printing. Most times I need only part of a stack for printing. When I use a stack I just slip the loops off and leave the knots in. When done with printing I move the loops back on and, when needed, tighten them by tying a slipknot, (the slipped version of the thumb knot,) and tie the loop around the string holding the stack, with a half hitch.
As one picture can replace a thousend words,
http://new.photos.yahoo.com/willeke_igkt/album/576460762346828951/photo/294928803708005232/2
to save your eyes.

I think for most people this would be a knive knot but I often undo the half hitch, tighten the loop again and tie a new half hitch.

Willeke
« Last Edit: January 06, 2007, 05:12:41 PM by Willeke »
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Dan Lehman

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Re: New applications for old knots?
« Reply #4 on: February 23, 2005, 10:09:57 PM »
Quote
Good Idea, Lasse, ...

Although one might as well simply ask for actual uses of any knot
--nevermind whether it might be regarded as "new".  At least in
some cases, I think that simply getting field data, as it were,
will be helpful.

Quote
When I use a stack I just slip the loops off and leave the knots in. When done with printing I move the loops back on and, when needed, tighten them by tying a slipknot, (the slipped version of the thumb knot,) and tie the loop around the string holding the stack, with a half hitch.

(Your words were pretty good, and thanks for the picture.)
Why not knot these binding loops with some friction hitch,
to slide snug/open as needed, with anticipated adjustability?
I have a friend who was looking for something to replace the rubber
bands with which he bound together video & audio cassettes for his
video business, and I'd collected some venetian blinds and other assrtd.
cordage for this (but his need seems to have diminished).
My thought was some more secure variant of the Rolling H., and some
stopper in the hitched end; make up maybe 2-3 lengths to accommodate
expected needs, and he can have the loops at the ready, hanging on a
nail or somewhere.

On my own, I've long heard of the UNneed of the nevertheless always included
(in general knots books) Sheepshank, and hence wondered at its longevity
therein.  But a novel use occurred to me:  use it to widena rope at
some point of personal bearing (e.g., for a rope to be set over one's
shoulder in carrying a weighted pale) or even to fashion a sort
of temporary handle for pulling on a line (though this is more
easily done by making a multi-eye loopknot).
It's unlikely that the first use can be effected for any extant pale
handle, as that will likely be sized too small to give the extra
line needed to form the knot; but if one's making the attachment
anew, the addition can be provided.

The Pile Hitch (#1815--and elsewhere) has been advanced as a better
alternative for uses of the Marlinespike H. (#1789), and I think
that Brion Toss intends to so present it, in his impending new book
on knots.  (For a more secure hitch, simply make a full turn with
the bight before putting it around the object--i.e., bring it
around the ends from the opposite side and then place it as usual.)

Back to the point about actual uses, although in reference to Ashley
this will appear "new", the Seizing Hitch (#3390) is often used as
a mid-line binder in commercial fishing gear.  It's the same form as
the Groundline/Picketline H., but tied in reverse, where the Half-Hitch
components can be individually set very tight, the first holding
well enough to enable forming and setting the finishing HH.
(And, for a more secure binder, simply make the 2nd HH a full round
turn with double tucking (like finishing common whipping), which
takes a bit more care in working tight).)  There are some other like
hitches that are employed similarly; sometimes this Seizing H. has
HH.s fore & aft.  Or a Clove H. is tied, with the end leading to
a HH on the other side of the initial HH of the Clove, which makes
a knot that could be seen as the Seizing H. with an embedded HH.

(-;

Willeke

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Re: New applications for old knots?
« Reply #5 on: February 23, 2005, 10:31:07 PM »
Dan,
There is a simple reason not to use a different knot, the string we use at work is such that any knot under strain becomes a kniveknot. It is the splitfilm string, very cheap (I think) and comes in the colour white.

After use I sometimes hang on the loops and undo the packaging knots. It is possible but the time involved makes it impractical to do so for further storing.

I was not looking for a better way to do the job but to share a use for a knot I often use.


I saw another use for the sheapshank mentioned recently, with the ends fixed, (pull the ends tru the loops) it can be used as an emergengy sling. (A sling like the one David used against Goliath.)

Willeke
"Never underestimate what a simple person can do with clever tools,
nor what a clever person can do with simple tools." - Ian Fieggen

Writer of A booklet on lanyards, available from IGKT supplies.

KnotNow!

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Re: New applications for old knots?
« Reply #6 on: February 24, 2005, 09:14:10 PM »
Access to my loft is via a vertical ladder.  Everything must be hauled up or lowered with a line rather than carried in hand.  To keep the resident mice from walking up the hand line and into my storage space I use "Bell Ringers Knot" ABOK #172 or ABOK #173 to keep the end of the line from draping on the floor when not in use.
I wonder at Dan's post regarding the sheepshank as unneeded.  Since the Bell Ringers Knot is half a sheepshank I'd have to say I use one everyday.  I've several other applications around the homeplace where the sheepshank is always in use.  One such just got discontinued when my "gate post" (a living tree on which the gate was hung) blew over.  The gate was a log, hung horizontally from the vertical spar tree.  The resulting boom would sweep 90 degrees from closed to open, just like a sailboat boom.  Both ends of the line were tied semi permanantly.  Tie the sheepshank to hold the gate open, release the sheepshank to let the gate swing closed.  Many other ways would have worked but this was quick and painless.  Too bad the tree wore out.
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Lasse_C

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Re: New applications for old knots?
« Reply #7 on: February 25, 2005, 12:42:22 AM »
Quote

Although one might as well simply ask for actual uses of any knot
--nevermind whether it might be regarded as "new".


Well, let us say, then, that I am after "unconventional"  or maybe "untraditional" applications for knots.  ;)

It appears that it greatly helps getting people who would otherwise not be interested in knots to be so.

LC

skyout

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Re: New applications for old knots?
« Reply #8 on: October 23, 2009, 10:58:23 PM »
I know this is an old thread, but here's an idea I had.

I thought I'd show a use I came up with that allowed the good ole' rope ladder (found in The Marlinspike Sailor by Hervey Garrett Smith) to come back to a useful life and make the little woman happy at the same time. Unfortunately, I didn't get to reap the rewards I thought I'd get as I broke one of her lighthouse plates (notice the clock) while hanging them on homemade hooks made from coat hangers.