Author Topic: What knot(s) to use for consecutive loops in same rope to use for exercise?  (Read 6297 times)

AntalyaJoe

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Hi!
Just registered. You have a great website. I would like to ask you a question on which knot I should use for a particular application and how to tie that particular knot.
 
My application is for bodyweight exercises. I have an online example of someone using straps and sewing loops on the straps to have different lengths.

http://www.angelfire.com/ny5/shenandoah/Grunt/Bodyweight.html
 
I think I could do this cheaper(possibly better?) if I used rope instead of straps. Would do you think?  If you think rope would be just as good, how would I tie loops in the rope so as to adjust the working length of the rope?  Is it possible to use the same length of rope and just tie a number of loops so I can adjust the working  height by simply placing my carabiners in the appropriate loops?
 
Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.
 
Sincerely,
 
John Stontz

Sweeney

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Welcome to the forum John.

You could easily use rope as long as the safe working load is sufficient and it may be cheaper (depends on the rope - climbing rope is fairly expensive). I would tie Butterfly knots (aka Alpine Butterfly knots) at intervals (you don't need access to the ends of the rope). The Butterfly can be used as a knot near the end otherwise the Figure 8 loop or Bowline.  All of these knots can be found in a Google search (as well as most books) and as there are so many sites to choose from pick the one you find easiest to follow.

Barry

roo

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Hi!
Just registered. You have a great website. I would like to ask you a question on which knot I should use for a particular application and how to tie that particular knot.
 
My application is for bodyweight exercises. I have an online example of someone using straps and sewing loops on the straps to have different lengths.

http://www.angelfire.com/ny5/shenandoah/Grunt/Bodyweight.html
 
I think I could do this cheaper(possibly better?) if I used rope instead of straps. Would do you think?  If you think rope would be just as good, how would I tie loops in the rope so as to adjust the working length of the rope?  Is it possible to use the same length of rope and just tie a number of loops so I can adjust the working  height by simply placing my carabiners in the appropriate loops?
 
Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.
 
Sincerely,
 
John Stontz

Since I don't know exactly what you have in mind, I'll leave this pretty open-ended.  There are numerous ways to adjust a rope or use different tie-in or inteface points.

There's loops on the bight:

http://notableknotindex.webs.com/butterflyloop.html
http://notableknotindex.webs.com/spanloop.html
http://notableknotindex.webs.com/farmersloop.html
http://notableknotindex.webs.com/midspan.html

There are hitches on the bight:

http://notableknotindex.webs.com/pilehitch.html
http://notableknotindex.webs.com/tumblehitch.html

There are friction hitches where typically a smaller rope grips on a larger rope:

http://notableknotindex.webs.com/sailorhitches.html
http://notableknotindex.webs.com/blakeshitch.html
http://www.chockstone.org/TechTips/Prusik.htm

There are knots that make adjustable size loops to alter length:

http://notableknotindex.webs.com/slippery8.html
http://notableknotindex.webs.com/tautline.html

Maybe you could describe the task in more detail.  It sounds interesting.
« Last Edit: May 23, 2012, 03:18:15 PM by roo »
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Dan_Lehman

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... which knot to use  ... and how to tie that particular knot
I emphasized "particular" because it's more important to first sketch the
general cordage structure you might employ, and even then there might
be several knot-solutions to your rope-problem.

Quote
My application is for bodyweight exercises.
I have an online example of someone using straps and sewing loops on the straps to have different lengths.
I think I could do this cheaper(possibly better?) if I used rope instead of straps. Would do you think?
Webbing (straps) can be kinder on the body, having a broad surface;
but thick rope can also be fine.  You might experiment putting some
pressure by yourself to see how different materials feel.  Right now,
I'm thinking of a solution that uses rope as a tension member but
has webbing making human contact -- but certainly the latter could
be replaced with rope (not so well the former, though!).

Quote
{H}ow would I tie loops in the rope so as to adjust the working length of the rope?
 Is it possible to use the same length of rope and just tie a number of loops
 so I can adjust the working  height by simply placing my carabiners in the appropriate loops?
My idea is simpler, more flexible (I think):
  • The support comprises a rope for attachment to the anchor, long enough for all;
  • then attached to that are slings (circles/loops ...) of webbing, which can be adjusted
    to whatever position along the rope is desired, tied to the rope with friction hitches.

And one could of course have more than one sling attached per rope,
if that seemed to facilitate the structure's use (or in case of many-limbed
users!  :D  ).

For the friction hitches for the slings, I'd try a novel knot I'll a ProhGrip
Sling hitch -- just like the Klemheist (Google), except that the penultimate
wrap of the to-be-loaded end should (also) pass through the supporting
/ locking bight as will the final wrap.  I think that this knot might give a
better stability than the Klemheist.

Now be advised that knots simply don't come with a guaranteed set of
properties; or I should say that such physical properties don't narrowly
attach to knot schemas?  -- materials matter!  What might work in this
tape on that rope well could be not so good on some other combination.
In the case of the friction hitch indicated above, you might simply need
to adjust the number of wraps that are made (I think that the Klemheist
is often recommended with four or more?).

Also, tape/webbing, of an appropriate 9/16" or 1" tubular (rockclimbing
sizes) should grip pretty well on 3/8"-1/2" rope; but if those slings are
of rope, which you'd want to be reasonably thick for taking had pressure,
gripping becomes more of a challenge.  Conceivably, you might construct
the slings of two materials, a thicker one for comfort joined to a thinner
one for gripping.  Depending upon your overall needs, a single rope
could work, with its "loop" formed by turning back upon itself with
e.g. a Blake's ("ProhGrip" my nod to Prohaska) hitch closing this now
adjustable eye; but raising the knot say 2 feet will raise the eye just
1 foot -- can such a structure work for you?
Heck, alternatively you could have one big circle that is of rope
tied to itself, and then adjust its circular size by sliding the rope
through the closing friction hitch.  -- and something akin to what's
called the "Purcell Prusik" (Google -- maybe w/options on the (mis)spelling
of "Prusik":  often 'prussic', 'prusick', 'prussik' ... ), which is sometimes
used as a structure with an eye (longest reach) and other times as the
closed circle just described (smallest reach; eye-size small).

--dl*
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DerekSmith

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Hi John,

Two suggestions.

First - use the rope and knots described in the 15 min. Door Gym.  Whoever designed this, is spot on with suitability and minimalism coupled with flexibility and usability - it is a neat use of rope and knots.  If you do not want the rope to go to a single fixing point, then use two straps, one around each corner of the top of the door.

Second - get a garden.  An hours hard work in the garden and you will have worked every muscle you know of and a dozen or so of muscles that physio's have yet to discover, with the added advantage of getting some fresh air in your lungs and even some home grown veg on the dinning table.

Derek

Dan_Lehman

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>> use the rope and knots described in the 15 min. Door Gym.

For me, Google finds only a quite un-knotted metal structure that is to fit
in a door, held by pressure of the exercising person.  Looks best for pull-ups.
As for gardening, I'm stuck on how that might exercise "abs", and too often
is pointed at for irritating rather than helping the back.

 ???




DerekSmith

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The 15 min Door Gym is illustrated just over 3/4 way down the site referenced in John's original post

http://www.angelfire.com/ny5/shenandoah/Grunt/Bodyweight.html

Derek

Dan_Lehman

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The 15 min Door Gym is illustrated just over 3/4 way down the site referenced in John's original post
http://www.angelfire.com/ny5/shenandoah/Grunt/Bodyweight.html[/url
Thanks for your searching, Derek!  (That lonnnng page doesn't seem to fully load
for me, but I got to the relevant part & bottom -- just missing some interesting
bit of colored rope-structure diagram mid-way and other odd bits/parts.)

Okay, even considering this simple structure, I'll stand by the suggestion
I made previously, which I think is more easily flexible.  Note the use of
hollow, rigid cylinders for comfort on the hands; take care on the material
run through them by rounding the inner edges to prevent abrasion/cutting.

On the particular, cited rope gym, I'd prefer a Ring bend and maybe even
an Offset Ring Bend to the Square knot that's put in the webbing, which
is used partly qua stopper against the closed door -- the ORB directly meets
this task, qua stopper (joining the tape into a sort of teardrop shape).

Some other sightings in this stream of DYI structures:
the two eyeknots in blue rope, said to be (but clearly not)
"some heavy-duty mountaineering rope" are not both bowlines
-- the right one is right, the left one nearly that Myrtle eyeknot,
where the end was too quick to the rabbit hole!  (not quite half-way down)

On the whole, yes, gardening, a good walk, a better cycling outing,
and maybe some time at a local climbing gym, seem a far better
exercise plan than plumbing one's door frames.  (And in the climbing
gym you get to use knots -- or at least one, sometimes a required one.)

--dl*
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