Author Topic: Needlework bottles  (Read 9916 times)

Frayed Knot Arts

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Needlework bottles
« on: December 11, 2008, 02:11:02 AM »
A friend, Sam Lanham, wrote with this question and I thought I'd pose it here for the Knotmeisters:

"Question:  Iʼm trying to find out whether you have ever seen another hitched bottle as large as the one I just finished.   It is 42 inches tall and has a volume of 56 liters.
 


Knotting Matters had a picture of a large bottle with a rounder shape.  It wasnʼt too long ago but I canʼt find it.  I donʼt think it was as tall as mine but it may have had a larger volume.   I guess I could write a letter to KM  but I wanted to check it out and get your advice in the matter."



So:  How say you all?  Anyone aware of a larger hitched bottle?

aknotter

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Re: Needlework bottles
« Reply #1 on: December 11, 2008, 05:42:16 PM »
This one is a 5 gallon water bottle covered by Clifford Case. (a member of the Pacific Americas Branch of the IGKT.)
(((Oops - you did specify "needle hitched" - which this one isn't, obviously.)))
« Last Edit: December 11, 2008, 05:43:35 PM by aknotter »
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Phil_The_Rope

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Re: Needlework bottles
« Reply #2 on: December 11, 2008, 07:31:22 PM »
Inspiration, yet again, from my friends at the IGKT.

I just wish I had more time, but seeing these posts makes me realise I need to devote more time to knot tying!

There's a photo attached of a couple of decorated cider bottles I managed to put together (eventually). Far from perfect, but I quite like them as I spent a bit of time constructing them. However, every time I see someone else's efforts I aspire to something better.

Keep up the good work, you guys and gals!

Phil The Rope
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Andre van der Salm

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Re: Needlework bottles
« Reply #3 on: December 11, 2008, 07:55:00 PM »
Here is a picture of a waterbottle, I think 20 - 30 litres, made by Ben Asberg, member of the Dutch IGKT branch

http://home.tiscali.nl/knotsandknottying/igkt310508.html#thumb5

And here is another bottle by Ben, at least 40 litres i think

http://picasaweb.google.com/avdsalm1/RotterdamWorldPortDays2008#5243718303716415042


kind regards
Andr? van der Salm

DerekSmith

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Re: Needlework bottles
« Reply #4 on: December 12, 2008, 10:34:00 AM »
Andre,

How lucky you are to have such a wonderful and skilful group.

Enjoy them.

Derek

Sam3

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Re: Needlework bottles
« Reply #5 on: December 12, 2008, 04:30:03 PM »
Bottle hitching friends--The pictures you have sent in response to Vince's posting are beautiful.  I've done one or two macrame bottles, but nothing like the one posted.  The bottles from the Dutch IGKT are well done and definitely challenge me to do better work.  Ben's fully hitched bottle is exceptional in workmanship and bottle shape.  Thanks for sending these.  I'll be inspired to concentrate on better quality hitching.  Sam Lanham

Sam3

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Re: Needlework bottles
« Reply #6 on: December 12, 2008, 04:43:47 PM »
I forgot to mention Phil's superb cider bottles.  Phil, are these part macrame and part needle hitching?  I need to learn to incorporate more variety in my work.  I also need to exchange hitching techniques with you experts.  My slow method of hitching took about 50 hours on the big bottle and about 975' of 3/16" soft-laid cotton rope. Teach me!  Thanks.  Sam

Phil_The_Rope

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Re: Needlework bottles
« Reply #7 on: December 16, 2008, 07:39:02 PM »
Hi Sam.

The White one is basically square knotting, the brown one is needle hitching. I really can't take full credit either, really, because I've pinched the techniques and ideas from books, articles etc. that I've found!

I must admit that these were not my first attempts either - I have made a mess of many things I've tried first time around, although it's nice when things do work out!

Time taken - there's the catch! There must be many folks out there who can rattle stuff off much more quickly than I can, but I guess "practice makes perfect" (or maybe not quite perfect in my case!)

Estimating the amount of cord needed is a real problem - I TRY to over estimate, and then use "left-overs" to make key rings or small landyards.

Good Luck!

Regards,

Phil
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http://www.gr8-knots.com

Sam3

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Re: Needlework bottles
« Reply #8 on: December 16, 2008, 10:53:00 PM »
Phil--I almost always use a LAZY STRAND to provide color and to help standardize size, tightness, and spacing since my eyes and hands won't do this on their own.  Usually, for the lazy strand I work from a spool I know to contain more than enough length.  The once or twice I have run out before completion I just had to splice in a new piece.  Since there is not much stress on the lazy strand it also usually works to trim the ends at an angle and glue them with super glue.  Once the hitching has resumed the lazy will be working well.  As to the WORKING STRAND, on the big bottle I used pieces 30' long.  On standard bottles I usually use 18' to 25', depending on the size of the cord and bottle.  I've come up with a way to add the new strand that, for me at least, is easier than splicing the small stuff.  I take the old strand up through the hitch above as usual, but instead of coming back down I take it up a couple of more rows and bring it out to the surface.  Then I take the new strand and enter on the same row as the old strand came out.  Take it down behind the lazy strand and out above the old strand.  Pull it all the way through except for for about 4 inches.  Then I tie overhand knots in the two ends that are sticking out two rows above the working row.  Later they will be cut off and the ends will sink into the body of the knotwork. This in effect will look exactly like a standard half-hitch and your new section of working strand is ready to go.  Sounds complex in writing but it's much simpler in your hands.  I'LL BE VERY GLAD TO HEAR ABOUT ANY EASIER WAYS TO PROCEED.   Sam