Author Topic: A great loss, but all aboard OK.  (Read 2258 times)

skyout

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A great loss, but all aboard OK.
« on: September 11, 2008, 06:30:19 PM »
http://my.att.net/s/editorial.dll?eeid=6088814&eetype=article&render=y


Photo:

This is an undated handout image released by Coiste an Asgard of the tall ship Asgard II which sank off the coast of France Thursday Sept. 11 2008. Ireland's majestic sail-training ship, the Asgard II, sank mysteriously off the French coast Thursday, but its 25 passengers and crew escaped safely on lifeboats. Commandant Fergal Purcell, spokesman for the Irish Defense Forces, said French rescuers took everyone in the lifeboats to the island of Belle-Ile-en-Mer, about 10 miles (15 kilometers) off the coast of Brittany. (AP Photo/Coiste an Asgard, Ho)

Takler

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Re: A great loss, but all aboard OK.
« Reply #1 on: September 11, 2008, 08:53:31 PM »
this is a very great loss. . .

Marcin
Marcin
Szczecin, Poland

squarerigger

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Re: A great loss, but all aboard OK.
« Reply #2 on: September 11, 2008, 11:01:45 PM »
How fortunate that no lives were lost and what an enormous shame that such a beautiful vessel would sink so rapidly!  A "critical loss in stability" as quoted by the captain in the newspaper, is hard to imagine in such a relatively short period of time (5 minutes is quoted by the captain).  It would seem that any through-hull fitting would necessarily be small enough (likely not more than 2.5-inches diameter) that it's loss would allow the crew some time, maybe thirty minutes or so, before the vessel fills and sinks completely.  Because this alarm was sounded at 0200 hours (2 am) one would also have to ask if the bilges were being sounded (the depth of water always there in the bottom of the ship) at regular intervals prior to and at that time to detect any pattern of rising water levels?  Recalling the all-night grounding of the vessel Irving Johnson and the loss of so many other fine vessels (recall Tallships Down?), five minutes seems very short.  There are many lessons to be learned and I am hopeful that we will be able to hear more in due course.  I feel sure also that all of these questions will be answered then - I just am very thankful that no lives were lost. :o

SR