Author Topic: Knots **In The Wild**  (Read 101575 times)

asemery

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Re: Knots **In The Wild**
« Reply #195 on: November 02, 2018, 11:11:06 PM »
DerekSmith,
  The red and blue strands appearing in the middle of the 'nip' made it appear to me as if two twists were involved.  On closer inspection using a magnifying glass i see my error.  Thanks for clearing it up.  Tony

DerekSmith

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Re: Knots **In The Wild**
« Reply #196 on: November 08, 2018, 10:55:24 PM »
The cord is a substantial (half inch) hollow braid of some very slick material.  My guess is that it is some low stretch high tensile cord.

The hitch is nothing but the Simple Hitch #1594 made into a plastic former, with the end tucked for tidiness through the pivot hole.

Derek
« Last Edit: November 09, 2018, 07:24:24 AM by DerekSmith »

Brianne163

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Re: Knots **In The Wild**
« Reply #197 on: November 11, 2018, 11:38:59 PM »
Hi Tony
I am not allowed to reply to personal massages at this stage. Just saw your query, been away a while.
Answer to your question re Johnny Debt.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gfTWgMTqGqY
Regards
Brian
Brian Taylor  (MRM)
Hervey Bay Historical Village & Museum
13 Zephyr St. Scarness
Tel. (Home) 07-4124 6526

DerekSmith

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Re: Knots **In The Wild**
« Reply #198 on: December 16, 2018, 02:44:02 PM »
Not a very big picture frame (only about 10" x 6"), so it should be able to hold - just...

Dan_Lehman

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Re: Knots **In The Wild**
« Reply #199 on: December 18, 2018, 12:12:00 AM »
My guess is that it is some low stretch high tensile cord.
!!  And using such expensive and excessively strong
material with a plastic connector makes any sense?!   ::)
.:.  => polypropylene.  (And beware UV degradation,
though it can be somewhat ameliorated w/proper
additives to the material (and black vs. blue).)

 ;)

Dan_Lehman

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Re: Knots **In The Wild**
« Reply #200 on: December 18, 2018, 12:13:49 AM »
Not a very big picture frame (only about 10" x 6"), so it should be able to hold - just...
One good turn deserves another!
(The firsTwo "throws" having collapsed into the
clove h., so indicating a granny'd form.)

Thanks!
 ;)
« Last Edit: December 28, 2018, 12:54:49 AM by Dan_Lehman »

Dan_Lehman

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Re: Knots **In The Wild**
« Reply #201 on: December 28, 2018, 01:04:26 AM »
Here, the "wild" is cordage in venetian (window) blinds
discarded in favor of replacements, the discarded ones
being of unknown age.  (Alas, as of course the supporting
hardware for the blinds --i.e., what is screwed into the
window sill to hold the blinds top frame-- is included in
each blinds box and never used --the old suffices to hold
the replacement blind.  So, ... made, boxed, sealed, sent,
and into the trash w/o a second's use/benefit to anything!
(I've salvaged & saved now 25 such boxes of brackets &
screws ... , but to what end?  Who will ever need these
things, which likely come with any new blinds bought?)


I have two photos of drawings of the knotting; my illustrations
are mostly AS FOUND and not loosened for the sake of showing
structure --maybe I made some concessions thus.  One of
the blinds is from an older vintage (w/me a while), maybe
a different maker; the arrangement and cordage differ
from most everything else I've found
 (just two pieces of line --one long, one half-length--
  joined into a single stopper knot (in use; eye knot in form)
  for a single conical pull housing
    (others are 3 lines of 3 lengths each into a conical pull housing) ).

The cordage is a fine/thin/well-made (finely stranded)
double-braid (at least in one that I've separated sheath
from core).

I was/am a bit surprised that the knotting has some
variety, some *individuality* to it, and not all done
by or as though by a machine --yea!

It is the overall 2-lines structure shown in photo #2
that impresses me : it is what I'd think would be most
natural & well effective for making a 3-leg pot bridle
for round conch (whelk) pots, which are raised straight
upwards.  The longer line forms the eye and the shorter
one is tied into that eye; why not do the whole lot in
one fell swoop of an overhand?!  --but I've never seen
that, but rather some other joining where the 3rd leg
is inserted one way or another into the OH eye knot.

--dl*
====

ps : "venetian" gets red-underscored as a misspelling
here & in my Hotmail!?
« Last Edit: December 28, 2018, 01:33:26 AM by Dan_Lehman »

tomh

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Re: Knots **In The Wild**
« Reply #202 on: August 13, 2019, 09:06:00 PM »
Here's a life-sized knotting sculpture by the harbour in Victoria, BC, Canada. The real mooring ring that it's based on is nearby.
« Last Edit: August 13, 2019, 09:11:10 PM by tomh »

Dan_Lehman

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Re: Knots **In The Wild**
« Reply #203 on: May 01, 2020, 02:48:39 AM »
Egadz, yes, it has been FAR longer than "120 days" since
we've seen a post here,
but the point of this thread was to continually collect
information --sightings, mostly-- of actual-factual knots
in use.

To that end, I'll just revive the thread with a URLink
to some of the Alaskan crab fishers videos.  In this
particular one, I'm struck by the apparent TWIN
leg snoods/gangions (tied-to-longline connections
to pot bridles) coming up with these relatively small
pots.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4E9-Ql-WqrI

There are some big pots early on.
But at 10:29 one can see that THE SNOOD IS UNTIED
by the fellow at the rail & pot-line hauler,
who hands the detached pot to near fellow in yellow,
who empties and tosses the pot away.
One can see that it's a LOOP/eye tied into the long
line, and the snood is slip-hitched to that sling!
And again ... at 10:41, the untying done quickly
and an empty sling is all we see (and the pot &
capture must not weigh all that much).
11:18 gives a better, side view of the fellow
bringing up the pots.  I'm guessing it's a
slipped sheet bend, and then see that the
snood joins a bridle of another, dark piece of
rope tied to two points at the top of the pot,
the snood making probably a sheet-bend/BWL
tying loop through the folded bight as the 3rd
bridle leg, tied to the larger bottom ring.

--new to me.

Now, at 2:48 a big pot is brought up, a dble
(or trpl?) sheet bend to OH eye knot, but I can't
make out the 2-leg bridle hitches.

At 7:28, big rope, and another oddity to me :
seems that a thimble holds a stopped snood
w/long stopper tail spliced/tied to a float (which
was surely way under the water?!) --an anchor
bend
form of dbl. OH.  (And then the rope
gets coiled!)



--dl*
====

Dan_Lehman

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Re: Knots **In The Wild**
« Reply #204 on: May 04, 2020, 06:23:53 PM »
https://www.flickr.com/photos/106821818@N03/48041780243/in/album-72157708977292101/

More from the aquatic zone.

 :)

(edit to add)
https://www.seattlepi.com/news/slideshow/A-Dangerous-Season-for-Crabbing-6293/item-85307.php
and re
https://www.alaskafishradio.com/lots-of-ak-fishing-meetings-and-fish-forecasts/
Here, in the first photo, is a typical Alaskan crab
  [[sorry to confuse, but THIS photo came up in
     an article re photographer & many photos,
     filled with advertisements, too, alas;
     somehow now I've got just this pic?  fine]]

pot (700-800 pounds, empty) being brought up
to the rail (note the ice!!).  The hoist has hooked
the bridle below the overhand I think eye knot
(loading "the shelf", to rockclimbers), to which eye
a double or triple sheet bend is tied.

I cannot make out the bridle hitches to the pot.
I think we can assume clove hitches ON the pot,
but what is it away above the blue sleeves
--the tail of which points either perpendicular to
or along with the twin legs (which would not be
the case for an overhand or fisherman's eye).
« Last Edit: May 09, 2020, 01:43:32 AM by Dan_Lehman »