Author Topic: Knots **In The Wild**  (Read 88218 times)

asemery

  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 449
Re: Knots **In The Wild**
« Reply #195 on: November 02, 2018, 11:11:06 PM »
DerekSmith,
  The red and blue strands appearing in the middle of the 'nip' made it appear to me as if two twists were involved.  On closer inspection using a magnifying glass i see my error.  Thanks for clearing it up.  Tony

DerekSmith

  • IGKT Member
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1518
  • Knot Botherer
    • ALbion Alliance
Re: Knots **In The Wild**
« Reply #196 on: November 08, 2018, 10:55:24 PM »
The cord is a substantial (half inch) hollow braid of some very slick material.  My guess is that it is some low stretch high tensile cord.

The hitch is nothing but the Simple Hitch #1594 made into a plastic former, with the end tucked for tidiness through the pivot hole.

Derek
« Last Edit: November 09, 2018, 07:24:24 AM by DerekSmith »

Brianne163

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 10
    • Hervey Bay Historical Village & Museum
Re: Knots **In The Wild**
« Reply #197 on: November 11, 2018, 11:38:59 PM »
Hi Tony
I am not allowed to reply to personal massages at this stage. Just saw your query, been away a while.
Answer to your question re Johnny Debt.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gfTWgMTqGqY
Regards
Brian
Brian Taylor  (MRM)
Hervey Bay Historical Village & Museum
13 Zephyr St. Scarness
Tel. (Home) 07-4124 6526

DerekSmith

  • IGKT Member
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1518
  • Knot Botherer
    • ALbion Alliance
Re: Knots **In The Wild**
« Reply #198 on: December 16, 2018, 02:44:02 PM »
Not a very big picture frame (only about 10" x 6"), so it should be able to hold - just...

Dan_Lehman

  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3675
Re: Knots **In The Wild**
« Reply #199 on: December 18, 2018, 12:12:00 AM »
My guess is that it is some low stretch high tensile cord.
!!  And using such expensive and excessively strong
material with a plastic connector makes any sense?!   ::)
.:.  => polypropylene.  (And beware UV degradation,
though it can be somewhat ameliorated w/proper
additives to the material (and black vs. blue).)

 ;)

Dan_Lehman

  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3675
Re: Knots **In The Wild**
« Reply #200 on: December 18, 2018, 12:13:49 AM »
Not a very big picture frame (only about 10" x 6"), so it should be able to hold - just...
One good turn deserves another!
(The firsTwo "throws" having collapsed into the
clove h., so indicating a granny'd form.)

Thanks!
 ;)
« Last Edit: December 28, 2018, 12:54:49 AM by Dan_Lehman »

Dan_Lehman

  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3675
Re: Knots **In The Wild**
« Reply #201 on: December 28, 2018, 01:04:26 AM »
Here, the "wild" is cordage in venetian (window) blinds
discarded in favor of replacements, the discarded ones
being of unknown age.  (Alas, as of course the supporting
hardware for the blinds --i.e., what is screwed into the
window sill to hold the blinds top frame-- is included in
each blinds box and never used --the old suffices to hold
the replacement blind.  So, ... made, boxed, sealed, sent,
and into the trash w/o a second's use/benefit to anything!
(I've salvaged & saved now 25 such boxes of brackets &
screws ... , but to what end?  Who will ever need these
things, which likely come with any new blinds bought?)


I have two photos of drawings of the knotting; my illustrations
are mostly AS FOUND and not loosened for the sake of showing
structure --maybe I made some concessions thus.  One of
the blinds is from an older vintage (w/me a while), maybe
a different maker; the arrangement and cordage differ
from most everything else I've found
 (just two pieces of line --one long, one half-length--
  joined into a single stopper knot (in use; eye knot in form)
  for a single conical pull housing
    (others are 3 lines of 3 lengths each into a conical pull housing) ).

The cordage is a fine/thin/well-made (finely stranded)
double-braid (at least in one that I've separated sheath
from core).

I was/am a bit surprised that the knotting has some
variety, some *individuality* to it, and not all done
by or as though by a machine --yea!

It is the overall 2-lines structure shown in photo #2
that impresses me : it is what I'd think would be most
natural & well effective for making a 3-leg pot bridle
for round conch (whelk) pots, which are raised straight
upwards.  The longer line forms the eye and the shorter
one is tied into that eye; why not do the whole lot in
one fell swoop of an overhand?!  --but I've never seen
that, but rather some other joining where the 3rd leg
is inserted one way or another into the OH eye knot.

--dl*
====

ps : "venetian" gets red-underscored as a misspelling
here & in my Hotmail!?
« Last Edit: December 28, 2018, 01:33:26 AM by Dan_Lehman »