Author Topic: Knots **In The Wild**  (Read 91082 times)

Pinrail

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Re: Knots **In The Wild**
« Reply #15 on: June 16, 2008, 09:02:00 PM »
Well, while not a "practical" knot...I have found a couple "In the Wild."  When I awoke the other morning, and was combing through my beard (which does become "wild" after a good night's rest) I discovered the source of some tangles.  Upon closer examination, it appears I had a few simple overhand knots appear in a couple strands of hair.  Remembering this thread, I couldn't help but laugh!  If I can find my magnifying lens, I may take a closer look.  One such knot may even be a figure eight, looking at the way the strand of hair enters and exits the knot, but it is soooo tiny, I can't really tell.

-Abe

Dan_Lehman

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Re: Knots **In The Wild**
« Reply #16 on: July 16, 2008, 02:35:07 PM »
My current keen interest is in the ropework of commercial fishers ("ComFishKnots"),
to be distinguished from the fiddly fine stuff of anglers, btw.  Here I find Half-hitched
structures all over--Clove & Reverse Groundline hitches, seizings that are built up of
Half-hitches, other seizing hitches that employ Half-hitches.

Here is what I refer to above, courtesy of Nautile's keen camera'd eye:

http://charles.hamel.free.fr/knots-and-cordages/PICASA_Slideshow/Chalut_trawls_concarneau/target7.html

(click on image to be taken to thumbnail collection)

These "Reverse Groundline Hitch" binding knots (in paired white nylon hollowbraid)
are put on as shown right-to-left, and I think amount to 3 repetitions (per knot) of the
back'n'forth half-hitching of the RGH, before the lines run on to the next, nearby knot.
The number of repetitions (if any) will vary per tyer or use, and at times there will be
considerable wrapping between knots, rather than as here almost none.  The knot
works well in the compressible cord, but less well in round stuff.

--dl*
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skyout

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Re: Knots **In The Wild**
« Reply #17 on: October 03, 2008, 08:01:59 AM »
My Grandfather was a sponge diver until he got the bends. He also was a grouper fisherman, going out for weeks at a time. He passed away in 1960 when I was in the 3rd grade so you can imagine the joy I felt when I found this old pulley with 2 eye splices on it in his attic about a year ago.

Dan_Lehman

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Re: Knots **In The Wild**
« Reply #18 on: October 03, 2008, 06:08:20 PM »
Skyout, thanks for sharing that photo of the back-2-back eye splices.

Hmmm, I think that such a structure lost a lot of potential, either for
wear or strength:  the small single-strand in-between-splicetucks
part is a weak point; had the rope been short-spliced into a grommet,
it would be on the order of double strength, and w/o further constriction
able to be rotated vis-a-vis wear points at attachment points (pulley & opposite).
Better, in this regard, would be pure grommet, or, if particular-sized eyes
were needed, then with the grommet seized into such constraints;
or perhaps the ends of the eye tuckings could overlap in some split
of tuckings--done initially just to set eye size, then reaching far to
be finished in overlap to the others.  Or, ... spliced together!?

--dl*
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ps:  Lynn (no longer "newbie"), here's a good thread to report any findings from
    your Rockport travels!   ;)

DerekSmith

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Re: Knots **In The Wild**
« Reply #19 on: October 09, 2008, 07:04:38 PM »
My Grandfather was a sponge diver until he got the bends. He also was a grouper fisherman, going out for weeks at a time. He passed away in 1960 when I was in the 3rd grade so you can imagine the joy I felt when I found this old pulley with 2 eye splices on it in his attic about a year ago.

Skyout,  what an absolute treasure.  An imperfect tool, yet perfect for its job and saturated with hints to the way of life for your grandfather.  I hope you are able to weave a set of stories around this treasure to help bring to life your grandfather to today's new generations.  Maybe even show them how g-grandad might have made and used it.

Thanks for bringing it and the story to us.

Derek

Dan_Lehman

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Re: Knots **In The Wild**
« Reply #20 on: October 09, 2008, 07:13:50 PM »
ps:  Lynn (no longer "newbie"), here's a good thread to report any findings from
    your Rockport travels!   ;)
And I know that the postponed-to weekend weather was simply autumnally SPLENDID!!
So, what have you to report, of knots in the wild?

 :)

skyout

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Re: Knots **In The Wild**
« Reply #21 on: October 09, 2008, 08:13:41 PM »
Thanks Dan and Derek.
For all I know it could be great granddads as he had the first ferry across Tampa Bay. Before his ferry, everyone had to go by horses around the Bay. It's probably my grandfathers though. Maybe someone that knows more about metal pulleys could tell when it was made???

skyout

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Re: Knots **In The Wild**
« Reply #22 on: October 20, 2008, 04:03:10 AM »
Here's a good one for your guys. It's from our vacation up in Mystic Seaport.
You can go here to see more pics.
http://igkt.net/sm/index.php?topic=1153.0



skyout

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Re: Knots **In The Wild**
« Reply #23 on: October 20, 2008, 04:04:56 AM »
And a closer shot (sorry, I don't know why I wanted a pic of my hand, LOL).


Sweeney

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Re: Knots **In The Wild**
« Reply #24 on: October 20, 2008, 12:32:06 PM »
When the Open Golf Championship was held at Hoylake last year the local Council did some work to improve the look of the the main thoroughfare in Hoylake itself. One of their ideas was to replace benches, cycle rack, etc with "rope" supported items - the "rope" in this case being metal (cast iron?) but properly finished with a cast whipping. Photos attached.
« Last Edit: October 20, 2008, 12:34:23 PM by Sweeney »

roo

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Re: Knots **In The Wild**
« Reply #25 on: October 22, 2008, 05:32:59 PM »
When the Open Golf Championship was held at Hoylake last year the local Council did some work to improve the look of the the main thoroughfare in Hoylake itself. One of their ideas was to replace benches, cycle rack, etc with "rope" supported items - the "rope" in this case being metal (cast iron?) but properly finished with a cast whipping. Photos attached.

Me likey, Sweeney.  I wonder if such an effect could be had by applying electrical resistance spot welding to heavy wire rope...ya know, to stick the individual wires together and make things nice and rigid.  Or maybe epoxy resin impregnation would work.  I haven't tried either, but it'd be interesting.
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Sweeney

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Re: Knots **In The Wild**
« Reply #26 on: October 28, 2008, 09:01:24 AM »
I asked a couple of people I know if they thought that heavy wire rope (probably at least 30mm diameter) could be welded to be rigid. The impression I got (as neither would commit themselves) was that for the supported ring in the top picture this would possibly work - this is I think for tying up your dog whilst shopping, the cycle racks (not shown) are a curve like a letter S laid on its edge and this might also work for those but a seat taking 3 or 4 adults would probably not be rigid enough. The dog ring could be made completely from wire rope as absolute rigidity is not needed and there must be other non-load bearing street items which lend themselves to such a technique. Litter bin supports for example and small planters. Perhaps somebody skilled in wire rope could give it a try? Maybe a Guild logo with the ends forming 2 legs welded to a base plate for use as a freestanding outside sign when we have a meeting?

DerekSmith

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Re: Knots **In The Wild**
« Reply #27 on: December 01, 2008, 09:48:56 PM »
I really had an almost irresistible urge to post the link to the busty lady in bondage here - a real case of knots in the 'WILD' and an area of cord usage that is probably second only in usage to the tying of shoe laces.

Then I though better of it - I guess I am just getting OLD.

Derek


Dan_Lehman

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Re: Knots **In The Wild**
« Reply #28 on: May 14, 2009, 07:35:25 PM »
Here are some recent sightings from the east coast (Cape May area) of
commercial-fishing knotting & cordage & gear--fascinating & colorful stuff.

There are new regulations in the USA regarding the nature of groundlines
used for lobster & other fishing:  they must be "sinking", non-bouyant
(and maybe not "neutrally bouyant", even)--which in practical terms
implies some considerable ingredient of polyester along with the olefin
(be it PP or PE or CoEx PP/PE).  I was aware that such regulations
were in force in Maine, but not as far south as S. Jersey, and maybe
even farther.  The concern is re the Right Whale, which in feeding
with open mouth can snag the arcs of floating groundlines an become
entangles (and apparently get a knotted broken end snagged in the
baleen!?).  I found that the effect of such regulations--some/most? coming
with a state buy-back program for exchanged floating rope--was to cost
the particular fellow twice what the floating line cost (this maybe is w/o
regard to buy-back).  His new rope lay heavy on the starboard side of
the boat against the wall, and in yet unopened spools (7?) beneath
a tarp--each of 2,000', 5/8" Everson Pro 4-strand laid rope.

First pic, lobster pots stacked and tied-on (floating snoods, yes) with
double sheet(becket) bends, ends tucked once; note some couple
oddball cases of bridle hitches beside the usual Clove & tuck or
Clove & HH & Tuck or Clove & 2-tucks.  One case has the oddball
on one side, the usual on the other:  I wonder why !?  (And I can't
say what the oddball hitch is:  is the end tucked through lay,
wrapped around cage-corner again, and tucked again?)

2nd pic, a close-up of a pot's corner showing impact damage
nearby with front end pushed in sharply; this bridle is well
secured with Clove+HH+tuck, effectively making an eye
splitting the load to both turns of the Clove Hitch.

3rd pic, a snood hitched to the groundline; this is what I call
a "Near Groundline Hitch", for the final tuck is not through
the initial turn of the GLH but through the lay of the object rope.
Note that in this case the tuck is through the center of the lay
(being 4-strand, i.e., splitting the strands evenly), but the
finishing tuck outside of the knot is splitting strands 3:1
(which I surmise might be a more secure nipping--and I think
that such tucking in 3-strand is more secure than the 2:2 of
4-strand of equal lay firmness).
This hitch is quite loose, and has either not yet been loaded
in practice, or has been loaded in the direction/orientation
indicated, snood pulling off leftwards.  For if it was pulled
in the opposite direction, the hitch tends to draw up quite
well & snug, the loaded part pulling into later parts of the
hitch, and the initial turn clamping down atop the S.Part.

4th/final pic is of the vast lengths of rope stretched along
the boat.  The captain referred to cost as "per pound" !
As noted above, spools here were of 2_000 feet in length.
With this heavier rope, the loading of it manually must be
felt as an unwanted difference to the CoEx line.

--dl*
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« Last Edit: May 14, 2009, 08:05:25 PM by Dan_Lehman »

Dan_Lehman

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Re: Knots **In The Wild**
« Reply #29 on: May 14, 2009, 07:51:22 PM »
Okay, for the lobster pots pic, "Medium-Medium" (JPEG/resolution) was just
too big (108kb), and High/Small is tiny; let's see how Low/Medium looks.

(Eh, noticeably less well defined, but appreciably larger.)
(2nd attch. using Fine-600x400 =>76kb)

(-;
« Last Edit: May 14, 2009, 08:20:19 PM by Dan_Lehman »