International Guild of Knot Tyers Forum

General => Practical Knots => Topic started by: Windshift on June 13, 2014, 01:11:20 AM

Title: Which knots are used here?
Post by: Windshift on June 13, 2014, 01:11:20 AM
Hi,
I wonder if anyone can help me identify the knots on this walking stick.

I can see that the one around the staff is a "Prusik Knot"  but I would like to identify the knot that tightens up against it and the knot to adjust the loop.

The knots are shown in this very short video  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IlZ1kQLz1ZA (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IlZ1kQLz1ZA)
and are also shown on this web page  http://kingfisherwoodworks.com/hikingstickstrap.htm
 (http://kingfisherwoodworks.com/hikingstickstrap.htm)
Hoping You Can Help,

Graham
Title: Re: Which knots are used here?
Post by: [Inkanyezi] gone on June 13, 2014, 02:10:53 AM
It's half of the grapevine knot, with one extra turn.
You could call it a triple overhand knot.

Tie it just as the first half of the grapevine, but make one turn more.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zVOEtPVJ_xk
Title: Re: Which knots are used here?
Post by: Windshift on June 14, 2014, 09:53:30 AM
Thanks for the help folks !

I completed the task with your input and it is much appreciated.

cheers

Graham
Title: Re: Which knots are used here?
Post by: Dan_Lehman on June 16, 2014, 05:23:13 AM
It's half of the grapevine knot, with one extra turn.
You could call it a triple overhand knot.

For various reasons, I'd call the noose
structure
a "double strangle noose" --as
a strangle knot (a binder) has the form of
the grapevine's halves, and adding a turn
follows then one nomenclature for "double"
--and the implied number (2) can be seen
in the overwraps (turns over the crossing
of the ends).  Ashley calls this the scaffold
know (#1121)
.  (There is the poacher's noose
to refer to, too --Asley's #407.)

The walking-stick text asserts:
Quote
Shown below are some variations: grip above knot and grip below knot. The prusik knot winding on the shaft and the loop adjustment noose will not slip during any stresses encountered during hiking action.
I'd be chary of putting force by hand directly
on the Prusik hitch, which would need to be
set quite tight to resist movement by hand
in such loading.  (YMMV w/particular materials.)


--dl*
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