Author Topic: Zeppelin- (Rosendahl-) Bend vs. Double (Trippel) Fishermans vs. Alpine Butterfly  (Read 2042 times)

Coding

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Coding, have you obtained the answers to your questions?

I think so, double zeppelin and double fishermans on the prusik both work pretty well :)

Dan_Lehman

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@Dan Lehman I am soory but can you please make some photos of the knot tied loosely.
 I have no idea, how to tie it.
@Roo I will try it the next weeks  :)
And the zeppelin with stoppers will also be testet
Let me endorse Roo's dbl.zep. recommendation; that one
looks pretty good for better slack-security, while retaining
ease of untying.

As for my like-a-sheet bend recommenation, you have
all you need :: just tie the  "  backwards (i.e., load the
ends vice its SParts --which both, respectively, lie on the
same side (i.e., don't use the opp-side version)),
AND THEN
make a 2nd or 3rd wrap & tuck of the hitching line's
tail.

In other words, one might call this series the "multiple
Lapp bends
series --where the fairly well publicized
Lapp bend is what could be called the reverse(d)
sheet bend
.  For security, for many purposes, though,
it is essential to take the "hitching" line's (i.e., the end
NOT forming the U-shape, but the one that is tying TO
this U shaped end) end around the opposed SParts and
tucked back through again (& again).
These wraps resemble those of the grapevine/blood knot
with similar effect :: slack-security.  But, unlike these
knots, there is a fairly effective method to loosen &
untie the knot after loading :: pull the ends (tail vs.
SPart) of the U-part appart, to pry out some bit of
hitching-line SPart --enough to then work the knot
loose.  (I suppose that this might become less than
all so "effective", at least manually, but I  think that
in many reasonable circumstances of materials & force,
the method will lead to success.)

--dl*
====

Coding

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Thanks Dan. Now I know what you mean! Looks also good. But when tieing it feels SOOO wrong :D

And to quote the author where I found the Lapp knot:
(Thanks to roo for "evil impostor".)

Thank you all for your help!

Coding

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I just wanted to give some feedback.
As told by roo I now use the Double Zeppelin.
It stays tight but could be opened easy if necessary.
Until now I could not spot any problem with it.

agent_smith

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You might be interested in the attached image.
I routinely use a Zeppelin bend to form a round sling.
I use human rated EN564 accessory cord.

I have never had any need or urgency to use a Zeppelin bend with extra tucks.
An ordinary Zeppelin bends works perfectly fine.
Obviously (and I shouldn't need to state this), due diligence is required. You have to diligently cinch and dress the Zeppelin bend (as you would with any end-to-end joining knot).
I have never had a Zeppelin bend work loose.

My favorite EN564 accessory cords are made by Sterling USA.
Excellent build quality, frictive sheath, hard wearing, and very high MBS.
Popular with vertical rescue teams too.