Author Topic: Russian Sennit  (Read 5529 times)

AllThingsKnotical

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Russian Sennit
« on: March 14, 2015, 03:21:08 AM »
Looking for a tutorial? Can't seem to fine one anywhere......

pspiering

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Re: Russian Sennit
« Reply #1 on: March 14, 2015, 01:22:03 PM »
There are some directions in the book by Lindssey Philpott--The Ultimate Book of Decorative Knots.

The Russian takes long and is hard to correct if you make a mistake, but a wonderfully elegant thing.

I have a tutorial, but I think the file size is too large to upload here. You can email me at kingsfoil12@gmail.com and I will send it.

Pat

The Golux

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Re: Russian Sennit
« Reply #2 on: March 16, 2015, 04:01:22 PM »
correct me if im wrong but is a russian Sennit not just a double braid (over 2, under 2)? if it is frayed knot arts has a great guide that can be found here: http://www.frayedknotarts.com/tutorials/17-strand.html

pspiering

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Re: Russian Sennit
« Reply #3 on: March 17, 2015, 01:53:50 PM »
I believe the Russian sennit is indeed different. A Russian sennit needs to be tied in a multiple of 4 strands to work. I believe the sennit on Vince's web site is a 17 strand double braid.

The Golux

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Re: Russian Sennit
« Reply #4 on: March 18, 2015, 05:42:43 AM »
Oh okay it must indeed be different as the braid on vinces site can only be tied in odd numbers of cords, although he teaches more then just 17 strands in that guide

Sweeney

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Re: Russian Sennit
« Reply #5 on: March 20, 2015, 04:07:13 PM »
As is so often the case with knots the term "Russian Sennit" seems to have more than one meaning - attached is a picture taken from "Knots, Slices and Fancy Work" by C L Spencer, first published in 1934. The picture shows a 'Russian Mat or Sennit' made with pairs of strands hung over a rope but I assume that it would work with any number of strands though I haven't tried it.

Barry

The Golux

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Re: Russian Sennit
« Reply #6 on: March 22, 2015, 05:50:36 AM »
that knot is also in Hervey Garret Smith's the Marlinespike Sailor (pg. 45) but he calls it a "Russian or Walled mat" And yes it can be tied in as many cords are you can wrangle 
« Last Edit: March 22, 2015, 05:52:07 AM by The Golux »

Frayed Knot Arts

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Re: Russian Sennit
« Reply #7 on: April 16, 2018, 08:21:00 PM »
Well, I either missed or forgot this topic, so:  better late than never.

We used to use the "Russian Sennit" as a strip covering, a belt, a gunn'l cover on a gig or an Admirals Barge and the way I learned it (from BM1 McKinnon, RIP) was the same as in the Boatswain's Mate 3 & 2 training book from the Navy, https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uc1.b4256978;view=1up;seq=9[/url]. that takes you to the book itself... see below for the sennit instructions themselves.

I got lucky finding this when queried on it by one of the respondents on my tutorial pages (as, after seven months, my dear wife has YET to grant access to my book library which resides BENEATH her sideboard, dining table and an enORmous amount of crockery boxes "in storage". (Seems anytime I go looking for something, it's always, "In Storage".) 

("NO!  Don't move that, I'm not ready to move it yet!"
"But I only want a few books from underneath..."
"NO!  You'll move things and then never put them back again and..."
Well, she's right, y'know...)

Anyhow, there's the page for this and note that the Mat referenced in the post above for Mr. Smith's book is a mat, not the sennit.  Still nice when done up, but this one's purtier!  Groups of four and a lot of eyeball.


e.t.a.: Also have Pat Spierling's KHWW tutorial and the relevant BM page on my website.
http://www.frayedknotarts.com/tutorials/RussianSennit/RussianSennit.html





« Last Edit: April 17, 2018, 03:35:56 AM by Frayed Knot Arts »