Author Topic: Which hitch would you choose?  (Read 2967 times)

Mike

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Which hitch would you choose?
« on: August 30, 2009, 09:33:56 PM »
If you were to choose just one hitch for tying around a smooth pole for perpendicular pull, what would it be and why?  

I have been testing a few such as the ossel knot (not ossel hitch), clove hitch, snug hitch, groundline hitch.  Of those listed I have found the ossel and snug hitch to be the most secure.   I'm sure there are many I have not tried or heard of, thats why I am asking everyones input.

Edit:  Make this a two part question.     I also want to know what hitch you would use for a varying or shifting load, where the pull may be in several directions throughout it's use.  I would want a hitch that would not work itself loose.
« Last Edit: August 30, 2009, 09:55:47 PM by Mike »

Dan_Lehman

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Re: Which hitch would you choose?
« Reply #1 on: August 31, 2009, 12:20:54 AM »
There are so many factors involved that asking the question with only
so few specified ... begs the answers to include details in rationale,
I guess -- and so we learn.

The distinction between "Ossel" knots --i.e., concerning those names--
I think is a phony one, introduced in some book as though to be helpful,
perhaps, in giving a name?  The O.hitch --though they are both that--
is the briefer, and only properly/effectively a ring hitch (i.e., requiring
a like-sized diameter object for locking); the other is one Ashley named,
hmmm, "netline h." IIRC.

Here's another --which has an Ashley # but I'm not sure and headed out...--:
make the Groundline/Picketline hitch but instead of tucking the end down
under the S.Part, at that point in tying take the end OVER and BACK UNDER;
the result seems more slack-secure, better balanced, and is much like the
Constrictor but for being more easily loosened (by just pulling back on
the end).

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Some hitches are used because they can be tied under tension (and most
of those you cite cannot); some because they resist variously angled loading
(as you also ask about); some because they jam tight-secure, and some to
avoid that and be untied.  (I watched lobstermen deal with old groundline
by cutting off what I'll call "Near  Groundline Hitches" ("near" because
instead of tucking the end out under the S.Part, it was tucked down through
the lay of the object rope to which the "snood" (aka "gangion") was tied);
however, I found I could untie the hitch faster than this fellow was cutting
it away.

Around the commercial-fishing haunts I've plied in Cape May, the Clove H.
it much used, usually with the ends somehow secured (such as w/hog rings).

--dl*
====

Mike

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Re: Which hitch would you choose?
« Reply #2 on: August 31, 2009, 01:10:04 AM »
Here's another --which has an Ashley # but I'm not sure and headed out...--:
make the Groundline/Picketline hitch but instead of tucking the end down
under the S.Part, at that point in tying take the end OVER and BACK UNDER;
the result seems more slack-secure, better balanced, and is much like the
Constrictor but for being more easily loosened (by just pulling back on
the end).

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

 --dl*


 
====

I think this knot you described is what I am calling the "Snug hitch"  aka "Spar Hitch"   
« Last Edit: August 31, 2009, 01:11:59 AM by Mike »

Dan_Lehman

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Re: Which hitch would you choose?
« Reply #3 on: August 31, 2009, 04:12:34 AM »
Yes, you're right -- a fine knot.  (#1674)

One can see combinations:  a Constrictor or Strangle that feeds one
end into a Half-hitch or dbl.HH or Clove for loading -- so that the
loading doesn't affect the base knot, which is there for security
when slack.  The guard structure might loosen a bit when not
loaded, but the base would remain tied (and also easily untiable).

The Timber Hitch and Anchor Bend can be given round turns on their
S.Parts to bring in some friction-gripping for maybe a strength boost
and resistance to loosening when slack (setting might require some
initial loading and then pushing this additional turn back snug to
the knot body).

--dl*
====

roo

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Re: Which hitch would you choose?
« Reply #4 on: August 31, 2009, 03:00:29 PM »
If you were to choose just one hitch for tying around a smooth pole for perpendicular pull, what would it be and why? 

I have been testing a few such as the ossel knot (not ossel hitch), clove hitch, snug hitch, groundline hitch.  Of those listed I have found the ossel and snug hitch to be the most secure.   I'm sure there are many I have not tried or heard of, thats why I am asking everyones input.

Edit:  Make this a two part question.     I also want to know what hitch you would use for a varying or shifting load, where the pull may be in several directions throughout it's use.  I would want a hitch that would not work itself loose.

Perpendicular pull?  I'm not going to tell you that there is just one option, but have you tried a Slipped Buntline Hitch?

http://notableknotindex.webs.com/slippedbuntline.html

One nice thing about it is that it's unaffected by the shape of the object with which it is used.

By all means, be sure to try others.

P.S.  Many common hitches can be made more secure by adding a stopper knot on free-end side of the hitch, if you feel like it.  If the stopper is snugged up to the hitch to minimize possible flogging, all the better.

Also:  http://notableknotindex.webs.com/gnathitch.html
« Last Edit: February 13, 2012, 03:15:41 AM by roo »
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Mike

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Re: Which hitch would you choose?
« Reply #5 on: August 31, 2009, 11:48:47 PM »
Thanks Roo, i will give the slipped buntline a try sometime.  It may indeed be a very useful knot.